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Chess Game Collections
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  1. "E4 for the Creative Attacker"
    Games from the Chessbase Fritz Trainer DVD presented by GM Nigel Davies.
    21 games, 1963-2007

  2. 'Pon my Soul - Philidor Justified
    Pawns smothering, crushing or outfoxing pieces.
    4 games, 1834-2008

  3. *FORCE* your opponent to line up his pieces!
    notyetagm, chessgames.com 2009


    click for larger view


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    1 ♖e1x♗e7+! +- wins even though the e7-square has four(!) defenders versus only one(!) attacker, even though the ♖ is more valuable than the ♗, because the e7-square is <LINED UP> with both the Black e8-king and the Black d7-queen and White controls *both* of those <ALIGNMENTS>.

    1 ... ♔e8x♖e7 2 ♖h1-h7+ <skewer: e7,d7>


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    1 ... ♕d7x♖e7 2 ♖h1-e1 <pin: e7,e8>


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    ---

    Make forcing moves and other threats that coerce your opponent to line up his pieces, forming <PINNING CHAINS> and <SKEWERING CHAINS>, and then <PIN> and <SKEWER> these enemy pieces that you have forced into alignment.

    Kamsky vs Shirov, 2007


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    <39. Rgxg8+> Kh7 <40. Rh8+> Kg7 <41. Rdg8+> Kf6 <42. e5+> Ke7 <43. Re8+> Kd7 44. e6+


    click for larger view


    32 games, 1896-2010

  4. 1. h4's favorite games
    This collection is a mixture of weird, sharp, nicely-played, or interesting games that I think are cool. Hence, the title. ;)
    67 games, 1872-2010

  5. 2001 Capablanca memorial (elite)
    74 games, 2001

  6. 2001 Capablanca memorial (premier - I)
    All 91 games present.

    table[---
    Capablanca memorial 36th (Premier - I)
    ---
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 ---
    1 Renier Vazquez Igarza m CUB 2393 - ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 9½ 2 Zenon Franco Ocampos g ESP 2496 ½ - 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 9 3 Humberto Pecorelli Garcia m CUB 2430 ½ 1 - ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 1 1 1 1 1 8½ 4 Maikel Gongora Reyes m CUB 2417 ½ 0 ½ - 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 8½ 5 Rodney Oscar Perez Garcia m CUB 2471 ½ ½ ½ 0 - ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 8 6 Peter Szekely g HUN 2429 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ - ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 7 7 Silvino Garcia Martinez g CUB 2378 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ - ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 6½ 8 Ramon Mateo m DOM 2420 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ - ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 6 9 Luis Enrique Valdes f CUB 2413 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ - 0 0 0 ½ ½ 5½ 10 Yuniesky Quesada Perez f CUB 2474 0 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 - 0 1 1 1 5½ 11 Juan Borges Mateos m CUB 2436 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 - 0 ½ 0 5 12 Roi Reinaldo Castineira m ESP 2425 0 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 1 0 1 - 1 1 5 13 Ricardo Leyva Proenza f CUB 2400 ½ ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 - ½ 4 14 Plinio Pazos Gambarrotti m ECU 2421 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 1 0 ½ - 3 --- ]table

    14 players, 13 rounds x 7 games/round = 91 games total. Held at Cuba from Havana CUB (CUB), 5-20 May, 2001: http://ratings.fide.com/tournament_...

    Game Collection: 2000 Capablanca memorial (elite) , Game Collection: 2000 Capablanca memorial (premier - I) and Game Collection: 2000 Capablanca memorial (premier - II) were the previous installments of the various sections.

    Top: Game Collection: 2001 Capablanca memorial (elite) Lower: Game Collection: 2001 Capablanca memorial (premier - II) , and Game Collection: 2001 Capablanca memorial (mixed group) .

    Game Collection: 2002 Capablanca memorial (elite) and Game Collection: 2002 Capablanca memorial (group II) were the next installments of (some of) the various sections.

    http://torneocapablanca.inder.cu/re... was the website of the 2014 Capablanca memorial (in what is presumed to be Spanish - maybe google translate will bring up information about previous years).

    No modifications to the days, months or rounds of the tournament was made (perhaps chessgames.com can trust its own data which was supplied at the time of upload of the pgn source, (which would've been widely available on the Internet that year, but which might not be distributed from the same FTP source or whatever as today's - due to age of computer server life, etc)) during the creation of this collection. The player list was found from the FIDE site above, and cross-checked to see that the respective players were inserted into the section for this year's event.

    [References: (1) http://www.theweekinchess.com/html/... ]

    91 games, 2001

  7. 2004 - 2007 W's 2nd Term ECO A-D-E by FTB
    What's a couple thousand years?

    - 960 The Sung Dynasty was founded, reuniting much of China and ushering in a new era of progress. - 1001 Viking Leif Ericson explores North America. - 1066 William the Conqueror began building the Tower of London, which still stands today. - 1096 The First Crusade began.
    - 1100 The Oraibi village was founded in Arizona. - 1160's Work began on the gothic church at Notre Dame, and the school of Oxford was founded. - 1271 Marco Polo set off for China. He spent 15 years in service to the Khan Dynasty, then wrote a book about his travels. - 1350 The Black Death (bubonic plague) spread throughout Europe. - 1450 Johannes Guttenberg invented the printing press which revolutionized education and communication. - 1451 The Iroquois Confederacy is formed.
    - 1492 Christopher Columbus sailed the ocean blue in search of a westward passage to the Orient. - 1519 Ferdinand Magellan's crew is the first to sail around the world. - 1543 Nicolaus Copernicus published his work trying to prove that the earth and the other planets circle around the sun. - 1610 Galileo Galilei published the results of his telescopic observations confirming the planets circle the sun. - 1610 Santa Fe, New Mexico was founded by Spanish colonists. Hampton, Virginia was settled. - 1619 Slavery was introduced to the Colony of Virginia. - 1620 The Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower landed at Plymouth Rock. - 1670 Hudson’s Bay Company is formed.
    - 1673 Louis Jolliet and Jacques Marquette began to explore the Illinois Country. - 1681 The Province of Pennsylvania was founded by William Penn. - 1687 Sir Isaac Newton founded the study of mechanics based upon his three laws of motion. - 1692 The Salem witch trials took place in the Province of Massachusetts Bay. - 1698 Pensacola, Florida was established by the Spanish. - 1732 The First Great Awakening took place.
    - 1752 Benjamin Franklin's kite experiment took place. - 1754–63 The French and Indian War took place.
    - 1764 The Sugar Act, intended to raise revenues, was passed by the British Parliament. The Currency Act was also passed. - 1765 To help defray the cost of keeping troops in America, the British Parliament enacted the Stamp Act 1765, imposing a tax on many types of printed materials used in the colonies. Then they enacted the Quartering Act, requiring the Thirteen Colonies to provide housing, food, and other provisions to British troops. - 1770 The Boston massacre happened. British soldiers (certainly provoked and probably fearful) fired into a crowd of protestors in Boston, killing five and injuring six. - 1772 Samuel Adams organized the Committees of Correspondence. - 1773 The Boston Tea Party took place.
    - 1775 Paul Revere of the Sons of Liberty rode from Boston to Lexington, Massachusetts to warn the local Patriot militia of the approach of British forces. The next day, the "shot heard 'round the world" was fired. The following month, the Green Mountain Boys captured Fort Ticonderoga in modern Ticonderoga, New York from a British garrison. - 1776 Declaration of Independence established these United States of America. - Christmas Night 1776 George Washington's troops suffering a hard winter at Valley Forge crossed the Delaware River for a surprise victory at the Battle of Trenton significantly boosting morale and re-enlistments. This daring victory very well saved the Continental Army. - 1781 Surrounded, the British surrender at the Siege of Yorktown. - 1783 The Treaty of Paris officially ended the Revolutionary War. - 1789 The United States Constitution came into effect. George Washington was inaugurated as President in New York City. - 1790 Rhode Island, by a margin of 3%, became the thirteenth state to ratify the Constitution. - 1793 Eli Whitney invented the Cotton Gin.
    - 1800 Eli Whitney introduced the idea of production with interchangeable parts, the basis of mass production. - 1801 The Act of Union comes into effect, linking Ireland with Britain to form the United Kingdom. Both France and Britain, engaged against each other in the Napoleonic Wars, take the first census of their populations. - 1802 The British parliament passes the first Factory Act, limiting a child's working day in a factory to twelve hours. - 1803 In Marbury v. Madison, a landmark example of judicial review, the US Supreme Court declares an act of Congress to be unconstitutional. - 1803 President Thomas Jefferson asserted his authority to make treaties bought the Louisiana Purchase from France, nearly doubling the size of the United States. Napoleon, then the First Consul of the French Republic, needed money for his military. The Louisiana territory included land from fifteen present U.S. states and two Canadian provinces, almost a million square miles. The Americans originally sought to purchase only the port city of New Orleans and its adjacent coastal lands, but quickly accepted the bargain. - 1804 Aaron Burr, the sitting Vice President, and Alexander Hamilton, the former Secretary of the Treasury, settled their bitter feud with a pistol dual that fatally wounded Hamilton. - 1804-1806 Captain Meriwether Lewis and Second Lieutenant William Clark led the Lewis and Clark expedition from St. Louis to the Pacific Coast and back, exploring and documenting the newly acquired Louisiana Purchase. - 1807 Robert Fulton sails the Clermont up the Hudson River using a steam engine imported from England. - 1807 Parliament's Slave Trade Act prohibited the importation of slaves in the British Empire. - 1810 Simón Bolívar, a young officer in Caracas, takes part in a coup which wins control of Venezuela from the Spanish. There will be more showdowns with Spanish troops in the future. - 1811 English author Jane Austen publishes her first work in print, Sense and Sensibility, at her own expense. - 1811 John Jacob Astor establishes Astoria, a settlement on the Pacific coast to develop his fur trade with China. - 1812 In the War of 1812, The US frigate Constitution, affectionately known as 'Old Ironsides', wins successes against British warships in the Atlantic. - 1813 The nickname Uncle Sam, supposedly based on the initials US, has its first recorded use in an issue of the Troy Post. - 1814 British forces enter Washington, burning the Capitol and the president's new White house. US lawyer Francis Scott Key writes The Star-Spangled Banner after seeing the British bombard Fort McHenry. - 1815 American volunteers under Andrew Jackson defeat British regulars near New Orleans, two weeks after peace has been agreed at Ghent. - 1815 The English and Prussian generals Wellington and Blücher defeat Napoleon in a closely fought battle at Waterloo. - 1816 Rossini's opera The Barber of Seville has its premiere in Rome. - 1816 René Laënnec, reluctant to press his ear to the chest of a young female patient, finds a solution in the stethoscope. - 1817 An informal financial market on Wall Street is transformed into the New York Stock and Exchange Board. - 1818 The 49th parallel is agreed as the frontier between the USA and Canada. - 1819 Spain sells Florida to the USA for $5 million, in return for the waiving of any American claim to Texas. - 1819 The decision in McCulloch v. Maryland prohibited state laws from infringing upon federal Constitutional authority. - 1819 Bolívar marches his army across the Andes, captures Bogotá and proclaims the republic of Gran Colombia. - 1820 The Missouri Compromise, admitting Maine and Missouri to the union, keeps the balance between 'free' and 'slave' states in the US senate. - 1821 Michael Faraday discovered electromagnetic induction. - 1821 The Sante Fe Trail, from Missouri to New Mexico, is opened up by the US trader William Becknell. - 1822 Egyptian hieroglyphs are deciphered by French Egyptologist Jean François Champollion, using the Rosetta stone. - 1823 The Monroe Doctrine is proclaimed. The USA will police the Western Hemisphere. - 1825 Work begins on the 363-mile Erie Canal that will link the Hudson River to Lake Erie. - 1826 James Fenimore Cooper writes The Last of the Mohicans, among his other novels. - 1828 Noah Webster publishes his American Dictionary of the English Language. - 1831 Victor Hugo publishes his novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame, in which the hunchback, Quasimodo, is obsessed with Esmeralda. - 1831 Nat Turner's slave revolt occurs.
    - 1835 French zoologist Félix Dujardin identifies protoplasm, the viscous translucent substance common to all forms of life. - 1836 The Battle of the Alamo (now San Antonio, TX) saw 200 Texans hold out for 12 days and kill over 1000 Mexican soldiers before being overwhelmed. Weeks later, Sam Houston's army surprises and defeats the Mexican army near the San Jacinto river, completing the seizure of Texas from Mexico. - 1837 John Deere invented the steel plow.
    - 1837 Charles Dickens' first novel, Oliver Twist, begins monthly publication. It came out in book form the following year. - 1838-1839: The Trail of Tears was a forced march of Eastern Native Americans to Indian Territory in present-day Oklahoma. - 1839 Louis J.M. Daguerre developed the first daguerreotype photo. - 1841 President William Henry Harrison dies suddenly from pneumonia. He is succeeded by his vice-president John Tyler. - 1844 The first inter-city telegraph from Washington to Baltimore was demonstrated by Samuel Morse, inventor of the Morse Code. - 1845 The Republic of Texas is admitted as the 28th state of the union. - 1845 New Yorker Alexander Cartwright devises the set of rules that become the basis of the modern game of baseball. - 1845 A blight destroys the potato crop in Ireland and causes what becomes known as the Great Famine. Many migrate to the USA. - 1845 Queen Victoria and Prince Albert follow the German custom of a family Christmas tree, immediately making it popular in Britain. - 1848 Gold was discovered on John Sutter's property near Sacramento, California, triggering a rush of gold seekers. California was admitted as a state three years later. - 1848 A treaty signed in Guadalupe-Hidalgo, ending the Mexican-American War, gives the US six new states. - 1848 The Communist Manifesto, by Marx and Engels, is published in Paris with the ringing slogan: 'Workers of the world, unite!' - 1850 Brothers James and John Harper launch Harper's Monthly Magazine in New York. It is still published today. - 1850 As many as 50,000 US pioneers travel west on the Oregon Trail this year. - 1850 US president Zachary Taylor dies after a short illness and is succeeded by his vice-president, Millard Fillmore. - 1850 The US Congress passes the Compromise of 1850, designed to defuse the growing crisis over slavery. The Fugitive Slave Act, concerned with the arrest of runaway slaves, is the most contentious part of the Compromise of 1850. Escaped slave Harriet Tubman makes the first of many dangerous journeys back into Maryland to bring other slaves into freedom. - 1850 Jenny Lind, the 'Swedish Nightingale', has a great success touring the USA in a show presented by P.T. Barnum. - 1850 Allan Pinkerton retires from the Chicago police force and forms the Pinkerton National Detective Agency. - 1851 The Great Exhibition attracts six million visitors to London's new Crystal Palace in a period of only six months. - 1851 Herman Melville publishes Moby Dick; or, The Whale, a novel based on his own 18-month experience on a whaler in 1841-2. - 1856 Lawrence, Kansas was sacked as retaliation for atrocities committed in Missouri. Unlike the movie depictions, no free soilers were killed in the raid. A bloodless feud still exists for some. - 1859 Darwin published the Origins of Species in which he posited the theory of evolution. That theory stated that man descended from apes. Some people still believe their ancestors were apes to this day. - 1859 Edwin Drake drilled the first oil well.
    - 1859 Abolitionist John Brown led a raid on Harper's Ferry, WVA in a failed attempt to seize an arsenal to arm slaves for a revolt. Brown was tried, convicted of treason, and hanged to death. - 1860 The Pony Express is founded to deliver mail westward. - 1860 Abraham Lincoln is elected President of the United States. South Carolina seceded from the Union the following month. - 1861 Jefferson Davis is elected President of the Confederacy. - 1861 Thanks to Louis Pasteur's work on microorganisms, pasteurization was introduced to milk, beer and other foods to preserve them. - 1862 The Homestead Act is passed.
    - 1869 The transcontinental railroad was complete from coast to coast, four years after the conclusion of the American Civil War. - 1871 The Great Chicago Fire.
    - 1871 British Columbia joins Canada.
    - 1876 Alexander Graham Bell successfully tested the first telephone. - 1877 Louis Pasteur's investigation of microorganisms resulted in his published Germ Theory of disease. Joseph Lister went on to initiate the practice of insuring that surgeons were clean before they conducted surgery. - 1879 Thomas Edison invented a long lasting light bulb to sustain electricity. Two years before, he had patented the phonograph. - 1885 The Canadian Pacific Railway is completed. - 1888 George Eastman patented the hand held camera. - 1890 The Eiffel Tower was completed.
    - 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre slaughtered American Indians. As a matter of record, the federal government broke every treaty in some fashion ever signed with Native American tribes. - 1900 Max Planck, the German physicist, published his quantum theory. - 1901 Queen Victoria died. She was 82 years old, and had ruled Great Britain and all its dominions since 1837. At her bedside was her son and successor as well as her grandson, the Emperor of Germany. - 1903 The First World Series was played.
    - 1903 Orville and Wilbur Wright's first plane flight sailed for 12 seconds over a length of 120 feet in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. - 1905 Albert Einstein, who at the time was a German physicist living in Switzerland, published the Theory of Relativity. - 1906 August von Wasserman, a German bacteriologist, developed a test to diagnose syphilis. This makes FTB curious about the history of condoms. - 1907 Paul Cornu flew the first helicopter. It flew for only twenty seconds and got five feet up in the air. The copter had severe control and stability difficulties. - 1907 The first Montessori school opened. Maria Montessori, who was the first women physician in Italy, opened a school for children. Her teaching methods, which bear her name, are still used today. - 1908 The Singer Building, in lower Manhattan, was completed. It was the first true skyscraper, reaching 47 stories. Later the same year, the 50-story Metropolitan Life Building was finished. - 1909 The first newsreel was shown in a Paris theater by Charles Pathe. The next year, newsreels were introduced into US theaters, where they became very popular. - 1912 Arizona, Alaska and New Mexico admitted as states to the USA. The Titanic collides with an iceberg and sinks. - 1913 The Ford Motor Company began the first moving assembly line in the world. The line assembled Ford "Model–T" cars. - 1903 The first home electric refrigerator was put on the market. It was called "The Domelre" and it was put on the market in Chicago for $900. - 1914 Prince Archduke Francis Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, was assassinated in Sarajevo. Shortly thereafter, Austria declared war on Serbia, spawning World War I. When the Russians came to the defense of the Serbs, the Germans went to war to defend their Austrian allies. - 1914-1918 World War I occurred.
    - 1919 Fredthebear's father was born in a log cave somewhere in the Appalachian Mountains. At the age of two, his family moved to the Boundary Waters of northern Minnesota where none other than Paul Bunyan taught him to play chess. FTB's father handily beat the top regional players Rocky and Bullwinkle, as well as Tom and Jerry in Chicago. He was invited to the Manhattan Chess Club in New York, posting a 29-1 record in a blindfold simultaneous exhibition (someone off the subway named Peter Pandolfini was the lone victor). A prize match was arranged with Frank Marshall. However, FTB's father was swindled six times and went o-for in an eight game match against Marshall. (Many believe the smell of NY delicatessen food distracted FTB's father.) He had been considering a professional chess career, but instead joined the circus for the next 70 years because the pay was better and there were more ladies in the audience who liked his dancing. Unfortunately, weekend circus performances interfered with chess tournament schedules. He did manage a draw against George Koltanowski's triple king pawn attack while passing through San Francisco. FTB's father has said that his greatest chess regret is that he did not read Lasker's Manual of Chess prior to playing Marshall. Today, FTB's father still reads descriptive chess books and blogs on chess websites, usually after eating an early lunch at Jason's Deli. - 1918-19 The influenza pandemic killed an estimated 20-50 million people world-wide, more than the Great War. - 1920 The first radio broadcast occurred in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. - 1927 Charles Lindbergh was the first person to fly non-stop across the Atlantic, solo. The flight lasted for 33 hours and 30 minutes, and created a new world record for distance (3,614 miles). - 1929 The stock market crash triggers the Great Depression. - 1832 The USA suffers the first of several cholera epidemics, spanning the next sixty years. - 1933 The Hoover Dam was completed in Nevada spanning the Colorado River. Its was 276 feet tall and 1,242 feet wide. - 1935 Millionaire Howard Hughes shattered the land speed record by reaching the speed of 352 mph. - 1935 Bill W. and Dr. Bob S. found Alcoholics Anonymous. - 1937 The German airship "Hindenburg" exploded upon landing in Lakehurst, New Jersey killing 36 passengers. The cause of the explosion is unknown to this day. - 1937 Amelia Earhart was lost over the Pacific in her attempt to make an around-the-world flight along the equator. - 1941 The Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii bringing the USA into WWII. - 1941 For the first time, penicillin was used to treat a human patient. Penicillin treated infections, and was widely used during World War II. - 1946 The first all-electronic computer was designed by John William Mauchly. The computer, called the ENIAC, weighed 30 tons. - 1949 Germany was divided into East and West. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization is formed to combat Soviet expansion. NATO deemed any attack on one of it's European and North American member countries would be considered an attack on all. - 1950–53 The forgotten Korean War took place, often in brutal conditions. - 1953 AA publishes the Twelve Steps.
    - 1954 A team from Harvard Medical School successfully completed the first kidney transplant operation. - 1958 The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was formed. - 1960 Following the Greensboro lunch counter sit-in, the Civil Rights Act of 1960 was passed. Additional Civil Rights acts were passed in 1964 & 1968. - 1962 President Kennedy handled the intense Cuban Missile Crisis. - 1962 The first international satellite broadcast of television took place. Satellite TV communication slowly transformed the way the world received news information. - 1963 President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, TX. - 1964 The United States Surgeon General issued a report in which it was reported that cigarette smoking posed a clear health danger to smokers. Thus began a concerted effort to reduce smoking in the United States. - 1967 Canada’s 100th birthday. Expo 67 World’s Fair was in Montréal. - 1969 The first test flight of a Boeing 747 was flown, launching the age of the jumbo jet to carry more than 300 passengers. - 1969 Man landed on the moon. (And returned home safely!) - 1972 PLO terrorists murdered 11 Israeli athletes at the Olympics. - 1973 First published reports of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), the common pattern of birth defects observed in children born to alcoholic mothers. - 1973 The CAT Scan, which stands for Computerized Axial Tomography, was introduced to the medical world. The CAT Scan produces three-dimensional images of internal organs of the body. - 1978 The smallpox disease was completely eradicated from the Earth, thanks to a worldwide prevention program, combined with wide distribution of a vaccine. - 1980 Mothers Against Drunk Driving, a grassroots advocacy program, is formed. - 1981 Sandra Day O'Connor was sworn in as the first female judge on the US Supreme Court. - 1984 French scientists reported isolating the virus that caused Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). In 1984, 7,000 cases of AIDS had been reported in the United States; 3,300 of its victims were dead by the end of the year. - 1984 The National Minimum Drinking Age Act requires all states to make purchase or public possession of alcoholic beverages illegal for anyone under the age of 21 or lose federal funding for highways. - 1989 The Communist regime of East Germany fell and down came the Berlin Wall. - 1989 Mandated by federal law, warning labels begin appearing on all alcoholic beverage containers. - 1990 The space shuttle Discovery launched the Hubble Telescope -- seven years behind schedule. The telescope was defective and it required a later repair mission to fix it. - 1991 The Gulf War ousts Saddam Hussein as dictator of Iraq. - 1992 Hurricane Andrew causes devastation in Florida and Louisiana. - 1995 The federal Mura Building was bombed by home grown terrorists in Oklahoma City, OK. - 1997 The US spacecraft Pathfinder landed on Mars. It began transmitting stunning images from the surface of the planet. Pathfinder released a robot vehicle to explore the surface. - 1998 Al Gore invented the internet.
    - 1999 FTB started playing chess on the internet, and his world was never the same. - 2016 The Chicago Cubs won the World Series.
    - 2016 Crooked Hillary lost the presidential election after she wiped her illegal private server clean, or something like that. (The FBI and Department of Injustice committed outrageous felonies in an attempt to throw the election her way, but it was another futile attempt by the federal government to accomplish something.) - 2017 There is an outrageously ridiculous "Russian Collusion" investigation as a major cover-up trying to blame Donnie Trump for Crooked Hillbilly's loss. The source of the allegations comes from fake news made up by the Democrats - and they turn it into a federal criminal investiagion!?!? - 2018 Still investigating Trump. Still no evidence he did anything wrong. Still no charges filed against the FBI, Dept. of Injustice, Clinton, or the Democrats. Can you spell C-O-N-S-P-I-R-A-C-Y? It's the second biggest conspiracy in American history, and the national media has to cover it up for the Demoncrats. - 2019 Still investigating Trump. Some people never grow up and face the facts.


    270 games, 2004-2007

  8. 20_KRP - coordinated action of King, rook +advan
    Klassiker des koordinierten Angriffs im Turmendspiel: Capablanca vs Tartakower, 1924 after <34...gxf5>:


    click for larger view

    after <40...Kh8>:


    click for larger view

    ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖

    Quote of the Day

    <If you study the classic examples of endgame play you will see how the king was brought up as soon as possible even though there seemed no particular hurry at the time. > -- Kotov

    36 games, 1824-2012

  9. 35_BB vs NN - the Squeeze
    <Horsemen - how do you know this is just a short squeeze, and not the beginning of something much more substantial?>

    Fundamental Chess Endings (by Müller/Lamprecht) has 5 ♗♗:♘♘ examples in chapter 5.3A. (p. 156-159)

    "In blocked positions, the knights can offer tough resistance, especially if they have secure anchor squares, but the 1st example shows how difficult it is to fight against the bishops in an open position." --> Judit Polgar vs Shirov, 1999

    = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ =

    achieve: FYI: Endgame explorer - which doesn't reach past 10 men - gives ♗♗♙♙♙ v ♘♘♙♙♙ W/D/L ratio as 37/52/11

    = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ =

    48 games, 1862-2019

  10. 35_BB vs NN - the Squeeze
    <Horsemen - how do you know this is just a short squeeze, and not the beginning of something much more substantial?>

    Fundamental Chess Endings (by Müller/Lamprecht) has 5 ♗♗:♘♘ examples in chapter 5.3A. (p. 156-159)

    "In blocked positions, the knights can offer tough resistance, especially if they have secure anchor squares, but the 1st example shows how difficult it is to fight against the bishops in an open position." --> Judit Polgar vs Shirov, 1999

    = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ =

    achieve: FYI: Endgame explorer - which doesn't reach past 10 men - gives ♗♗♙♙♙ v ♘♘♙♙♙ W/D/L ratio as 37/52/11

    = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ = ♘♘ = ♗♗ =

    48 games, 1862-2019

  11. 38_NN
    <This is the rhythm of the Knights>

    Kind of funny to follow these <feisty ponies> ...

    ,....,
    ,::::::<
    ,::/^\"``.
    ,::/, ` e`.
    ,::; | '.
    ,::| \___,-. c)
    ;::| \ '-'
    ;::| \
    ;::| _.=`\
    `;:|.=` _.=`\
    '|_.=` __\
    `\_..==`` /
    .'.___.-'.
    / \
    ('--......--')
    /'--......--'\
    `"--......--"`

    ,....,
    ,::::::<
    ,::/^\"``.
    ,::/, ` e`.
    ,::; | '.
    ,::| \___,-. c)
    ;::| \ '-'
    ;::| \
    ;::| _.=`\
    `;:|.=` _.=`\
    '|_.=` __\
    `\_..==`` /
    .'.___.-'.
    / \
    ('--......--')
    /'--......--'\
    `"--......--"`

    “If I paint a wild horse, you might not see the horse… but surely you will see the wildness!”

    Pablo Picasso

    http://kevinspraggettonchess.files....

    40 games, 1854-2016

  12. 43_R+B -opp.col. (wonderful attacking weapons)
    Endings with Bishops of opposite color are of frequent occurence, yet the chess literature offers relatively few examples with a Rook added to each side.

    <The presence of the Rook often overcomes the drawish tendency that results from the Bishop's inability to command squares of more than one color.

    <The general strategic principles of endgame play are again to be observed. The player having <

    - the better centralized King,

    - pawns controlling squares of the same color as the enemy Bishop,

    - and the more mobile Rook

    < usually has winning chances.

    >>>>

    -- CJS Purdy "On The Endgame"

    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

    <<Opposite colored Bishops> are wonderful attacking weapons in the middlegame (or in endgames with many pieces remaining) since one Bishop can attack something that the other can't defend.> -- Jeremy Silman

    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

    Müller/Lamprecht say that 15% of all games reach an ending of rook and minor piece vs rook and minor piece, so that you can expect to get such one in every tournament.

    Their statistics, with relative percentage frequencies, rounded:

    ♖♗ vs ♖♘ (45%)
    ♖♗ vs ♖♗ (22%) same coloured ♗
    --> ♖♗ vs ♖♗ (13%) opp. coloured ♗
    ♖♘ vs ♖♘ (20%)

    <Bees of Opps and Rooks <>>

    external: http://www.ajedrezactual.com/fifi12...

    http://www.chess.com/article/view/c...

    D.♔ explains Carlsen vs Karjakin, 2013 here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MgT6...

    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

    <T. Nissl> "Akademisches Monatsheft für Schach", 1910


    click for larger view

    #6

    <1.Bh4 Rd1 2.Bg3 Rc1 3.Bf4 Rc2 4.Bg5 Bf3 5.Bd8+ Rc7 6.Bxc7#>

    398 games, 1881-2019

  13. 48c_Q+B : Q+N
    ♕+♗ : ♕+♘ Which side is stronger?
    85 games, 1925-2018

  14. 48h QQ:QQ (4 Queens)/or more
    May a ♔ live well-enough and long-enough, to leave many joyful ♕♕widows behind him.

    recommended:
    Game Collection: Upside Down Rooks: Games with 4 or More Queens Game Collection: polygamy or what's an extra Q among friends?

    Bigamy is having one ♕ too many, monogamy is the same.

    Bildlich gesprochen: http://sphotos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphot...

    ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕

    The following games have been posted by User: PhilFeeley:

    A game not here yet, but should be:
    Milyaeva, Nina (1949) - Bezgodova, Maria (1936) [C24] Rudenko Mem/St Petersburg (5) 2005

    1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. d3 d5 4. exd5 Nxd5 5. Ne2 Be6 6. O-O Nc6 7. a3 Qd7 8. Ng3 O-O-O 9. Bd2 f6 10. b4 Nf4 11. Bb5 Qd5 12. Bxf4 Qxb5 13. Nc3 Qb6 14. Be3 Nd4 15. Nge4 Qc6 16. Qd2 h5 17. Rfb1 h4 18. h3 Bxh3 19. Bxd4 exd4 20. gxh3 dxc3 21. Qxc3 Qe6 22. Kg2 Rh5 23. Re1 f5 24. Nc5 Rg5+ 25. Kf1 Qc6 26. Re3 f4 27. Re4 f3 28. Qc4 Bxc5 29. bxc5 Rxc5 30. Qf7 Rxc2 31. Qxf3 Qd5 32. Qg4+ Kb8 33. Rd1 g5 34. d4 Rf8 35. f3 Rc3 36. Kg1 b6 37. Rf1 Qf5 38. Re8+ Kb7 39. Rxf8 Qxf8 40. Qxg5 Rc2 41. Qxh4 Qxa3 42. Qe4+ Rc6 43. d5 Rd6 44. h4 a5 45. Rd1 b5 46. Rd3 Qc1+ 47. Kf2 b4 48. h5 Qh6 49. Qg4 Rb6 50. f4 b3 51. Qf3 b2 52. d6+ c6 53. d7 b1=Q 54. d8=Q Rb2+ 55. Rd2 Rxd2+ 56. Qxd2 Qb6+ 57. Kg3 Qg1+ 58. Kh3 Qb6 59. Qd7+ Ka8 60. Qe8+ Ka7 61. Qg6 Qh8 62. h6 Qc8+ 63. f5 Qc5 64. h7 Q8f8 65. Kg4 Qc4+ 66. Kh5 Qe7 67. f6 Qe5+ 68. Kh6 Qh4+ 69. Kg7 Qc7+ 70. Kh8 Qd8+ 71. Qg8 Qd6 72. Qg7+ Kb6 73. f7 Qhe7 74. f8=Q Qxg7+ 75. Kxg7 Qe5+ 76. Q8f6 1-0

    Position after 74. f8=Q: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/fen?...

    ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕

    Sano, Tomu (2102) - Nadig, Kruttika (2241) [B92] Kuala Lumpur op/Kuala Lumpur (5) 2008

    1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be2 e5 7. Nb3 Be7 8. O-O O-O 9. Kh1 Nc6 10. f3 Be6 11. Be3 b5 12. a4 b4 13. Nd5 Bxd5 14. exd5 Na5 15. Qd2 Nxb3 16. cxb3 Qa5 17. Bc4 Nd7 18. Rfc1 f5 19. Be2 Kh8 20. Rc6 Nf6 21. Rd1 Rfb8 22. Qd3 e4 23. fxe4 fxe4 24. Qc4 Qd8 25. Rxa6 Rxa6 26. Qxa6 Rc8 27. Bc4 Ng4 28. Bd4 Bf6 29. Bxf6 Nxf6 30. Qa7 Rc5 31. Qb7 Ng4 32. Re1 h6 33. Qf7 Ne5 34. Qf1 Nxc4 35. bxc4 Qe8 36. b3 Qe5 37. Qe2 Qc3 38. Qxe4 Rc8 39. Qe3 Qc2 40. h3 Rf8 41. Qe7 Qf2 42. Qe3 Qb2 43. Qg3 Qf6 44. Kh2 Rd8 45. Re6 Qb2 46. Rxd6 Rxd6 47. Qxd6 Qxb3 48. c5 Qc3 49. c6 b3 50. c7 Kh7 51. Qf4 Qc2 52. d6 b2 53. d7 b1=Q 54. c8=Q Qcd1 55. d8=Q Qg1+ 56. Kg3 Qbe1+ 57. Kf3 Qgf2+ 58. Kg4 Qxg2+ 59. Qg3 Qgxg3+ 0-1

    Position after 59. Qg3: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/fen?...

    ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕

    Barroso, Ernesto (2440) - Puertas, Diego (2230) [A00] Valladolid ch Ascenso a Primera/Valladolid (3) 1992

    1. h4 a5 2. g4 b5 3. d4 d5 4. f4 e6 5. Nf3 Bd6 6. b3 Ne7 7. e3 c6 8. Bb2 Nd7 9. Nbd2 c5 10. dxc5 Nxc5 11. Qe2 Ba6 12. Qg2 b4 13. Bxa6 Rxa6 14. O-O Qb6 15. Rfe1 O-O 16. a4 Rc8 17. Rac1 f6 18. Kh2 Nc6 19. Nd4 e5 20. Nxc6 Rxc6 21. Kh1 exf4 22. Qxd5+ Kf8 23. exf4 Bxf4 24. Ne4 Nxe4 25. Qxe4 Re6 26. Qxe6 Qxe6 27. Rxe6 Rxe6 28. Rf1 Be5 29. Bxe5 Rxe5 30. Kg2 Re2+ 31. Rf2 Rxf2+ 32. Kxf2 Ke7 33. Ke3 Ke6 34. Kd4 g6 35. Kc5 Ke5 36. Kb5 Kf4 37. Kxa5 Kxg4 38. Kxb4 Kxh4 39. Kc5 Kg3 40. Kd6 Kf2 41. Kd7 Ke2 42. c4 h5 43. b4 g5 44. Kd6 f5 45. Kd7 h4 46. c5 f4 47. b5 g4 48. a5 h3 49. b6 f3 50. c6 h2 51. a6 g3 52. a7 g2 53. b7 f2 54. c7 h1=Q 55. a8=Q g1=Q 56. b8=Q f1=Q 57. c8=Q Qxa8 58. Qxa8 Qg4+ 59. Kc7 Qxc8+ 60. Qxc8 Qc1+ 61. Kd8 Qxc8+ 62. Kxc8 1/2-1/2

    Position after move 57: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/fen?...

    ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕

    Ruecker, Benjamin (2403) - Schumacher, Dennis (2062) [A15] Hessen-ch U18/Marburg (9) 2000

    1. c4 g6 2. Nf3 Bg7 3. g3 d6 4. Bg2 Nf6 5. O-O O-O 6. a4 d5 7. a5 dxc4 8. a6 c3 9. axb7 cxb2 10. bxa8=Q bxa1=Q 11. d4 a5 12. d5 a4 13. d6 a3 14. dxc7 a2 15. cxb8=Q axb1=Q 16. Kh1 1/2-1/2

    ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕

    Schwetlick, Thomas (2227) - Mantwill, Reiner (1797) [C92] GER chT8 LH-01 Br4 email/GER email 2009

    1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. c3 O-O 9. h3 Bb7 10. d4 Re8 11. Nbd2 Bf8 12. a4 h6 13. Bc2 exd4 14. cxd4 Nb4 15. Bb1 c5 16. d5 Nd7 17. Ra3 c4 18. axb5 axb5 19. Nd4 Qb6 20. Nf5 Ne5 21. Rg3 g6 22. Nf3 Ned3 23. Be3 Qd8 24. Nxh6+ Bxh6 25. Bxh6 Qf6 26. Bxd3 Nxd3 27. Re2 b4 28. Bg5 Qg7 29. Rg4 Nxb2 30. Qc2 Ba6 31. e5 dxe5 32. d6 c3 33. Re3 Reb8 34. Nxe5 b3 35. Qe4 Bb7 36. Qf4 Ra4 37. Qg3 Nc4 38. Rxc4 Ra1+ 39. Kh2 b2 40. Rb4 c2 41. Rxb7 b1=Q 42. Rxb8+ Qxb8 43. Rc3 f6 44. d7 fxg5 45. Rc8+ Kh7 46. d8=Q c1=Q 47. Rxc1 Qxd8 48. Rxa1 Qd4 49. Ra5 Qf4 50. Nf3 Qxg3+ 51. fxg3 g4 52. Ng5+ Kh6 53. h4 Qd4 54. Ra8 Qb6 55. Rf8 Kg7 56. Rf7+ Kg8 57. Rf4 Qa7 58. Rxg4 Qd7 59. Rf4 Qd6 60. Nh3 Qd7 61. Rc4 Qf5 62. Rc6 Kf7 63. Rd6 Qe5 64. Rd2 Qa5 65. Rd4 Qc5 66. Rg4 Kg7 67. Nf4 Kh7 68. Rg5 Qb6 69. Nxg6 Kh6 70. Ne5 Kh7 71. h5 Qe3 72. Nf3 Qe2 73. g4 Qe7 74. Kg3 Qd8 75. Re5 Kg7 76. g5 Qc7 77. Kh4 Qf7 78. h6+ Kh7 79. Re4 Qc7 80. g3 Qd7 81. Rf4 1-0

    Position after 46...c1=Q: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/fen?...

    ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕

    Lamorelle, Julien (2342) - Tran, Tuan Minh (2295) [C18] Budapest FS IM/Budapest (8) 2011

    1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 c5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 Qc7 7. Bd2 b6 8. Qg4 g6 9. Bb5+ Bd7 10. Bd3 c4 11. Be2 Ba4 12. Kd1 Nc6 13. h4 h5 14. Qf3 O-O-O 15. Bg5 Rd7 16. Nh3 Kb7 17. Qf4 Rh7 18. Kd2 Nce7 19. f3 Nc6 20. g4 Na5 21. Bf6 Nxf6 22. Qxf6 Qc8 23. Ng5 Rh8 24. gxh5 gxh5 25. f4 Qe8 26. f5 Re7 27. Raf1 Ka6 28. fxe6 fxe6 29. Nf7 Rg8 30. Bxh5 Bxc2 31. Kxc2 Qa4+ 32. Kd2 Qxa3 33. Ng5 Qb2+ 34. Ke3 Qxc3+ 35. Kf4 Qxd4+ 36. Kg3 Rgg7 37. Kh3 c3 38. Nxe6 Rxe6 39. Be2+ Nc4 40. Bxc4+ Qxc4 41. Qxg7 c2 42. Qg4 d4 43. Qe4 Rc6 44. Ra1+ Kb5 45. Rhf1 d3 46. Qe3 Qc3 47. e6 d2 48. Rf5+ Kb4 49. Rf4+ Kb3 50. Rf3 c1=Q 51. e7 d1=Q 52. e8=Q Qxf3+ 0-1

    Position after 58. e8=Q: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/fen?...

    ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕ - ♕♕♕♕

    Arnaudov, Petar G (2442) - Moser, Eva (2436) [A80] Max Gutmann Memorial/Augsburg (5) 2013

    1. d4 f5 2. Bg5 h6 3. Bh4 g5 4. e3 Nf6 5. Bg3 d6 6. h4 g4 7. Bd3 Nc6 8. Ne2 e5 9. Bb5 Qe7 10. c4 Bd7 11. Nbc3 Bg7 12. d5 Nd8 13. Bxd7+ Qxd7 14. Qc2 O-O 15. e4 f4 16. Bh2 Nh5 17. O-O-O Nf7 18. f3 g3 19. Bg1 Qe7 20. Kb1 Bf6 21. Nc1 Nh8 22. b4 Ng6 23. c5 Nxh4 24. Nb3 b6 25. Rc1 Ng7 26. Nb5 h5 27. a4 Qd7 28. Qe2 Rfc8 29. a5 bxc5 30. bxc5 a6 31. c6 Qe7 32. Na7 Rcb8 33. Ka2 Rb4 34. Rxh4 Bxh4 35. Rc4 Rbb8 36. Ra4 Bf6 37. Qxa6 h4 38. Qb7 Qf7 39. a6 h3 40. gxh3 Qh5 41. Nb5 Ne8 42. Nxc7 Nxc7 43. Qxc7 Qxf3 44. Bb6 Qg2+ 45. Ka3 Qxh3 46. a7 Re8 47. Qb7 f3 48. Bc7 f2 49. Bb8 f1=Q 50. Qxa8 g2 51. Qb7 g1=Q 52. a8=Q Qc5+ 53. Qb4 Qa1+ 0-1

    Position after 52. a8=Q: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/fen?...

    27 games, 1896-2014

  15. 500 Master Games of Chess
    '500 Master Games of Chess' by Savielly Tartakower and Julius Du Mont.
    490 games, 1788-1938

  16. 500 Master Games of Chess III (part 2)
    Book III: Closed Games (Dr. S. Tartakower, J. DuMont, Dover publications, 1975)

    This is a continuation of an incomplete collection started by another user. There are still several games missing, as they are not in the chessgames.com database - 361, 374, 417, 435, 438, 447, 449, 454. My goal is to upload the .pgn files for these games as time allows.

    131 games, 1841-1938

  17. 50_Bishop pair -how to get it in the opening
    An INTRO referring to a chapter of John Watson' <Secrets of modern chess strategy> should be possible on a trial basis... (see there part II, chapter 4-7)

    < White active: ♗b5xc6 or ♗g5xf6; passive ♘x ♗g3/♗f4/♗e3/♗d2 or x ♗b3/♗c4/♗d3/♗e2

    <<< Black active: ♗b4xc3 or ♗g4xf3; passive ♘x ♗g6/♗f5/♗e6/♗d7 or x ♗b6/♗c5/♗d6/♗e7

    <<>>>>>

    < ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ <>>

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 c5 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3>


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    C18/C19: French, Winawer/Winawer Advance Opening Explorer (3,209 games)

    < ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ >

    <1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Bxc6 dxc6>


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    C69: Ruy Lopez, Exchange Opening Explorer (3.208 games) with 5. O-O f6 6. d4 Bg4 7. dxe5 Qxd1 8. Rxd1 fxe5 --> Game Collection: 50_Queenless middlegames

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Qc2 O-O 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. Qxc3 >


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    E32: Nimzo-Indian, Classical Opening Explorer (2,757 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Bg5 a6 8. Na3 b5 9. Bxf6 gxf6 10. Nd5>


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    B33: Sicilian -Sveshnikov Opening Explorer (2096 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Bg5 a6 8. Na3 b5 9. Nd5 Be7 10. Bxf6 Bxf6 >


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    B33: Sicilian -Sveshnikov Opening Explorer (1954 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. d4 c6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bxf6 Qxf6 >


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    D43: Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav Opening Explorer (1232 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 O-O 5. Bd3 d5 6. Nf3 c5 7. O-O Nc6 8. a3 Bxc3 9. bxc3 >


    click for larger view

    E58: Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, Main line with 8...Bxc3 Opening Explorer (934 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. Bxc6 dxc6>


    click for larger view

    B31: Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation Opening Explorer (859 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. a3 Bxc3+ 5. bxc3>


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    E24-E29: Nimzo-Indian, Saemisch Opening Explorer (819 games) [<1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. f3 d5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 >]

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c6 2. Nf3 d5 3. Nc3 Bg4 4. h3 Bxf3 5. Qxf3>


    click for larger view

    B11: Caro-Kann, 2♘s variation, 3...Bg4 Opening Explorer (807 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Bb4+ 4. Nbd2 b6 5. a3 Bxd2+ >


    click for larger view

    E11: Bogo-Indian Defense Opening Explorer (552 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 dxe4 5. Nxe4 Be7 6. Bxf6 gxf6>


    click for larger view

    Classical C11: Classical French, Rubinstein Opening Explorer (551 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Bg5 Bg7 4. Nc3 d5 5. Nf3 Ne4 6. cxd5 Nxg5 7. Nxg5 >


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    D91: Grunfeld, 5.Bg5 Opening Explorer (537 games) with <7...e6 8. Qd2 exd5 9. Qe3+ Kf8 10. Qf4 Bf6 11. h4> as mainline (107 games left)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Bb4+ 4. Nc3 d5 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bxf6 Qxf6 >


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    D38: Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation Opening Explorer (481 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Bg5 e6 7. Qd2 a6 8. O-O-O Bd7 9. f4 b5 10. Bxf6 gxf6 >


    click for larger view

    B67: Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 7...a6 Defense, 8...Bd7 Opening Explorer (451 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Qc2 O-O 5.a3 Bxc3 6.Qxc3>


    click for larger view

    A17: English Opening Explorer (418 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ <1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 d5 3. Bxf6 exf6 >


    click for larger view

    A45: Queen's Pawn Game Opening Explorer (380 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 Bf5 5. Nc3 e6 6. Nh4 Bg6 7. Nxg6 hxg6 >


    click for larger view

    D12: Queen's Gambit Declined Slav Opening Explorer (371 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 c5 5. Bd3 Nc6 6. Nf3 Bxc3+ 7. bxc3 d6 >


    click for larger view

    E41: Nimzo-Indian, Huebner variation Opening Explorer (348 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. Bxc6 bxc6 >


    click for larger view

    B31: Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation Opening Explorer (319 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 d6 4. Bxc6+ bxc6 >


    click for larger view

    B30: Sicilian Opening Explorer (285 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 c5 3. Bxf6 gxf6 >


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    A45: Queen's Pawn Game Opening Explorer (274 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 g6 3. Bxf6 exf6 >


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    A45: Queen's Pawn Game Opening Explorer (222 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. Bxc6 dxc6>


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    C65: Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense Opening Explorer (216 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 e6 3. Nf3 h6 4. Bxf6 Qxf6 >


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    A46: Queen's Pawn Game Opening Explorer (215 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nc6 3. cxd5 Qxd5 4. e3 e5 5. Nc3 Bb4 6. Bd2 Bxc3 >


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    D07: Queen's Gambit Declined, Chigorin Defense Opening Explorer (211 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nf3 Bg4 4. cxd5 Bxf3 >


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    D07: Queen's Gambit Declined, Chigorin Defense Opening Explorer (209 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 c5 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. g3 Nf6 7. Bg2 Be7 8. O-O O-O 9. dxc5 Bxc5 10. Bg5 d4 11. Bxf6 Qxf6>


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    D34: Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch Opening Explorer (206 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Bg5 h6 5. Bh4 c5 6. d5 d6 7. e3 Bxc3+ 8. bxc3 >


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    E30/E31: Nimzo-Indian, Leningrad /Main Line Opening Explorer (203 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 b6 5. Bg5 Bb7 6. e3 h6 7. Bh4 Bxc3+ 8. bxc3 >


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    E12/E13: Queen's Indian, 4.Nc3, Main line / E21: Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights Opening Explorer (202 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. Bxf6 Bxf6 >


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    C13: French Opening Explorer (202 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 b6 5. Bg5 Bb7 6. e3 h6 7. Bh4 g5 8. Bg3 Ne4 9. Qc2 Bxc3+ 10. bxc3 >


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    E12/E13: Queen's Indian, 4.Nc3, Main line / E21: Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights Opening Explorer (173 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Bb4+ 4. Nbd2 O-O 5. a3 Bxd2+ >


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    E11: Bogo-Indian Defense Opening Explorer (169 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. exd5 exd5 5. Bd3 Nc6 6. a3 Bxc3+ 7. bxc3>


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    C01: French, Exchange (Winawer) Opening Explorer (139 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. Nf3 d6 2. d4 Bg4 3. c4 Bxf3 >


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    A41: Queen's Pawn Game (with ...d6) Opening Explorer (139 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    < 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Bg5 e6 7. Qd2 a6 8. O-O-O Bd7 9. f4 Be7 10. Nf3 b5 11. Bxf6 gxf6 >


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    B69: Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 7...a6 Defense, 11.Bxf6 Opening Explorer (138 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nf3 Bg4 4. cxd5 Bxf3 5. gxf3 Qxd5 6. e3 >


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    D07: Queen's Gambit Declined, Chigorin Defense Opening Explorer (134 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 g6 2. c4 Bg7 3. Nc3 c5 4. d5 Bxc3+ 5. bxc3 f5 >>


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    A40: Queen's Pawn Game aka <The <Dzindzi Indian> Opening Explorer (117 games) see also my Game Collection: 98_A40 Dzindzi Indian aka The Beefeater

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1.Nf3 Nf6 2.d4 e6 3.c4 d5 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bh4 O-O 7.e3 b6 8.Qb3 Bb7 9.Bxf6 Bxf6 10.cxd5 exd5>


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    D58: Queen's Gambit Declined, Tartakower (Makagonov-Bondarevsky) System Opening Explorer (117 games)

    else <1. Nf3 Nf6 2. d4 e6 3. c4 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 O-O 7. e3 b6 8. Bd3 Bb7 9. Bxf6 Bxf6 10. cxd5 exd5 >


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    Opening Explorer (88 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e5 3. g3 Bb4 4. Bg2 O-O 5. Nf3 Nc6 6. O-O e4 7. Ng5 Bxc3 >


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    A29: English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto Opening Explorer (107 games +)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 d5 3. Bxf6 gxf6 >


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    A45: Queen's Pawn Game Opening Explorer (105 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 e6 7. f4 Qb6 8. Qd2 Qxb2 9. Rb1 Qa3 10. f5 Nc6 11. fxe6 fxe6 12. Nxc6 bxc6 13. e5 dxe5 14. Bxf6 gxf6 >


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    B97: Sicilian, Najdorf Opening Explorer (99 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. g3 Be7 5. Bg2 O-O 6. O-O dxc4 7. Ne5 Nc6 8. Bxc6 bxc6 9. Nxc6 >


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    E06: Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3 Opening Explorer (98 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e5 3. g3 Bb4 4. Bg2 O-O 5. Nf3 Nc6 6. O-O Bxc3 >


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    A29: English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto Opening Explorer (90 games +)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    < 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Bb4+ 4. Nc3 c5 5. g3 cxd4 6. Nxd4 Ne4 7. Qd3 Bxc3+ 8. bxc3 >


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    E20: Nimzo-Indian / E21: Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights Opening Explorer (95 games)

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 e6 7. f4 Qb6 8. Qd2 Qxb2 9. Nb3 Qa3 10. Bxf6 gxf6 11. Be2 >


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    B97: Sicilian, Najdorf Opening Explorer (90 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 d5 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bxf6 Qxf6 7. e3 O-O 8. Rc1 dxc4 9. Bxc4 c5 >


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    D38: Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation Opening Explorer (87 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nc6 4. O-O Bd7 5. Re1 a6 6. Bxc6 Bxc6 >


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    B30: Sicilian / B51: Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack Opening Explorer (84 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Bg5 e6 7. Qd2 a6 8. O-O-O Bd7 9. f4 h6 10. Bxf6 >


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    B67: Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 7...a6 Defense, 8...Bd7 Opening Explorer (79 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 Bxc3+ 5. bxc3 >


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    E40: Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3 Opening Explorer (78 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Bg5 Bg7 4. Nc3 d5 5. Bxf6 Bxf6 >


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    D80: Grunfeld Opening Explorer (77 games) with <6. cxd5 c6 7. Rc1 O-O 8. dxc6> as mainline (22 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 h6 8.Bxf6 gxf6 >


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    B63: Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack Opening Explorer (70 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Be2 O-O 6. O-O Bg4 7. h3 Bxf3 8. Bxf3 >


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    B08: Pirc, Classical Opening Explorer (69 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    < 1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 e6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 Nf6 6. Nxc6 bxc6 7. e5 Nd5 8. Ne4 f5 9. exf6 Nxf6 10. Nd6+ Bxd6 11. Qxd6>


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    B40: Sicilian / B45: Sicilian, Taimanov Opening Explorer (53 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e5 2. f4 Bc5 3. Nf3 d6 4. Nc3 Nf6 5. Bc4 Nc6 6. d3 Bg4 7. h3 Bxf3 8. Qxf3>


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    C30: King's Gambit Declined Opening Explorer (46 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Qb6 6. Be2 Nh6 7. Bxh6 gxh6 >


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    C02: French, Advance Opening Explorer (45 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 c5 5. a3 Ba5 6. Qg4 Ne7 7. dxc5 Bxc3+ 8. bxc3 >


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    C17/C18: French, Winawer Opening Explorer (42 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. b3 Nf6 2. Bb2 g6 3. Bxf6 exf6>


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    A01: Nimzovich-Larsen Attack Opening Explorer (41 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Qb6 6. a3 Nh6 7. b4 cxd4 8. Bxh6 gxh6 9. cxd4 >


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    C02: French, Advance Opening Explorer (41 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. Nf3 Bg4 5. Be2 e6 6. O-O Be7 7. c4 Nb6 8. Nc3 O-O 9. Be3 d5 10. c5 Bxf3 >


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    B05: Alekhine's Defense, Modern Opening Explorer (37 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 c5 5. a3 Ba5 6. b4 cxd4 7. Nb5 Bc7 8. f4 Bd7 9. Nxc7+ Qxc7 >


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    C17/C18: French, Winawer Opening Explorer (35 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. Nf3 Bg4 5. h3 Bxf3 6. Qxf3 >


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    B05: Alekhine's Defense, Modern Opening Explorer (35 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 c5 3. Bxf6 exf6 >


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    A45: Queen's Pawn Game Opening Explorer (32 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qa5 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 Bg4 6. h3 Bxf3 7. Qxf3 >


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    B01: Scandinavian Opening Explorer (31 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Be2 O-O 6. O-O Bg4 7. Be3 Nc6 8. Qd2 e5 9. dxe5 dxe5 10. Rad1 Qc8 11. Qc1 Rd8 12. Rxd8+ Qxd8 13. Rd1 Qf8 14. h3 Bxf3 15. Bxf3 >


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    B08: Pirc, Classical Opening Explorer (30 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 Nf6 3. g3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Bg2 Nc6 6. d4 cxd4 7. Nxd4 Ndb4 8. Nxc6 Qxd1+ 9. Kxd1 Nxc6 10. Bxc6+ bxc6 >


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    A15: English / A04: Reti Opening Opening Explorer (27 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nf3 Bg4 4. Nc3 e6 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bf4 Bxf3 7. gxf3 >


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    D07: Queen's Gambit Declined, Chigorin Defense Opening Explorer (27 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Nf3 c5 5.g3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3>


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    E21: Nimzo-Indian, Three Knight Opening Explorer (26 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. O-O Bg7 5. Re1 Nf6 6. c3 O-O 7. d4 cxd4 8. cxd4 d5 9. e5 Ne4 10. Bxc6 bxc6 >


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    B31: Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation Opening Explorer (26 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. cxd5 Nxd5 4. g3 g6 5. Bg2 Nb6 6. d3 Bg7 7. Be3 Nc6 8. Bxc6+ bxc6 >


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    A16: English Opening Explorer (24 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. c4 e6 2. Nc3 d5 3. d4 Be7 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bg5 c6 7. Qc2 g6 8. Bxf6 Bxf6 >


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    D43: Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav Opening Explorer (19 games) [this looks like a bad trade-off for white, %-wise]

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 Bg4 6. h3 Bxf3 7. Qxf3 >


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    B01: Scandinavian Opening Explorer (18 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. d5 d6 4. Nc3 g6 5. e4 Bg7 6. Bd3 O-O 7. Nf3 Bg4 8. h3 Bxf3 9. Qxf3 >


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    A56: Benoni Defense (5) / A40: Queen's Pawn Game (3) / A42: Modern Defense, Averbakh System; even B27: Sicilian Opening Explorer (14 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. b3 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bb2 Bg4 4. e3 Nbd7 5. h3 Bxf3 6. Qxf3 >


    click for larger view

    A06: Reti Opening Opening Explorer (14 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <
    1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 c5 7. d5 Bg4 8. O-O Na6 9. h3 Bxf3 10. Bxf3 >


    click for larger view

    E91: King's Indian (various openings actually) Opening Explorer (12 games, there are actually more games, if you go along, eg <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 c5 7. d5 Bg4 8. O-O Na6 9. h3 Bxf3 10. Bxf3 Nc7 11. Be3 Nd7 > with 20 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. b3 d5 2. Bb2 c5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. e3 Nf6 5. Bb5 Bd7 6. O-O e6 7. d3 Be7 8. Nbd2 O-O 9. Bxc6 Bxc6 10. Ne5 >


    click for larger view

    A06: Reti Opening / A01: Nimzovich-Larsen Attack Opening Explorer (10 games [only])

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. Nf3 d6 2. d4 Bg4 3. e4 Nf6 4. h3 Bxf3 5. Qxf3 >


    click for larger view

    A41: Queen's Pawn Game (with ...d6) Opening Explorer (7 games (only))

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. Nf3 d6 2. d4 Bg4 3. c4 Nd7 4. e4 Bxf3 5. Qxf3 g6 >


    click for larger view

    A41: Queen's Pawn Game (with ...d6) Opening Explorer (4 games (only))

    # <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nc6 4. O-O Bg4 5. h3 Bh5 6. c3 a6 7. Bxc6+ bxc6 > 9 games

    # <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. h4 c6 6. Bg5 O-O 7. Bxf6 Bxf6> (3 games)

    # <1. Nf3 d5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. d3 Bg4 4. Bg5 h6 5. Bxf6 gxf6> G Welling vs G Tammert, 1986

    # <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Bf4 Nh5 5. Be5 f6 6. Bg3 Nxg3> Euwe vs Alekhine, 1935

    # <1.g3 Nf6 2.c4 d5 3.cxd5 Nxd5 4.Bg2 g6 5.Nc3 Nb6 6.Nf3 Bg7 7.d3 O-O 8.Be3 Nc6 9.Qc1 Bg4 10.h3 Bxf3 11.Bxf3> K Spraggett vs M Campbell, 1974

    52 games, 1923-2018

  18. 51- -> Birth and Power of a Central Passed Pawn
    <So do we pass the ghosts that haunt us later in our lives; <they sit undramatically by the roadside like poor beggars, and we see them only from the corners of our eyes, if we see them at all. <The idea that they have been waiting there for us rarely if ever crosses our minds. <Yet they do wait, and when we have passed, they gather up their bundles of memory and fall in behind, treading in our footsteps and catching up, little by little.>>>>

    -Stephen King

    ♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙♙

    A passed pawn on the <6th rank <<!>>> has a tremendous effect on the opposite camp. This collection is to learn about the <brawl of a brook> before this happened. ̿̿'̿'\̵͇̿̿\=(•̪●)=/̵͇̿̿/'̿̿ ̿ ̿ ̿

    <Creativity takes courage. <>> Henri Matisse

    <The passed pawn is a criminal, who should be kept under lock and key. Mild measures, such as police surveillance, are not sufficient.> Aaron Nimzowitsch

    = = =

    <Major-piece endings, for example ones with ♕+♖ are notorously decided in favour of the side with the more effective and/or more advanced passed pawn. From the standpoint of modern middlegame theory, the more interesting issue concerns the role of passed pawns earlier in the game. ...> John Watson, Secrets of modern chess theory, (Chapter 'The lustful contemporary passed pawn', p 37.)

    <(' .' )>

    208 games, 1900-2017

  19. 53a_Middlegames: Positional Exchange Sacrifices
    Interne Nummerierung:

    1 = Petrosian
    2 = Kasparov
    3 = Kramnik
    4 = Karpov
    5 = Fischer
    6 = Carlsen
    7 = Andersson
    8 = Anand
    9 = Gelfand
    10 = Aronian
    11 = Botvinnik
    12 = Tal
    13 = Korchnoi
    14 = Topalov

    15 = Bronstein
    16 = Smyslov
    17 = Spasski
    18 = Geller
    19 = Alekhine
    20 = Keres
    21 = Tarrasch
    22 = Lasker
    23 = Capablanca
    24 = Shirov
    25 = Mamedyarov
    26 = Ivanchuk
    27 = Svidler

    < No Sacrifice, No Victory! <>> http://www.damnlol.com/i/cf1b08fc97...

    " Petrosian introduced the exchange sacrifice for the sake of 'quality of position', where the time factor, which is so important in the play of Alekhine and Tal, plays hardly any role. Even today, very few players can operate confidently at the board with such abstract concepts. Before Petrosian no one had studied this. By sacrificing the exchange 'just like that', for certain long term advantages, in positions with disrupted material balance, he discovered latent resources that few were capable of seeing and properly evaluating." ~ Kasparov

    ♖ = ♘ = ♗ = ♖♗ = ♖♘ = ♖ = ♗ = ♘ = ♖♗ = ♖♘ = ♖ = ♗ = ♘ = ♖♗ = ♖♘ = ♖ = ♗ = ♘

    Intro: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_ex...

    Related and recommended game collections: Game Collection: The Exchange Sacrifice ; Game Collection: "Learn from the Legends" - Mihail Marin Section 5! ; Game Collection: The Exchange Sacrifice ; Game Collection: Deep Exchange Sacrifices, Part One: Petrosian ; Game Collection: The Exchange Sacrifice: A Practical Guide ;

    google search on <Exchange sacrifices>: http://www.google.de/#hl=de&sugexp=...

    Series on <the exchange sacrifice> on YOUTUBE by User: cludi:

    <1> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBVe...

    <2> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0N4E...

    <3> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDp-...

    <4> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndaX...

    <5> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bW-l...

    <6> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9eo...

    <7> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfaS...

    <8> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__2c...

    ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖

    Lecture on Exchange Sacrifices with GM Ben Finegold http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smTv...

    ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖

    GM Alexander Ipatov shows one of his Exchange Sacrifices: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nj1...

    ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♘x♗ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♘x♗ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♘x♗ - ♖ - ♖ Qualitätsopfer als taktisches wie auch positionelles Kampfmittel werden zu selten angewandt, wahrscheinlich aus Furcht vor der materiellen Einbuße; dies vermutet der ungarische Autor (im Vorwort S. 3), der im dritten Band seiner Reihe "Kombinationen lernen und lehren" eine systematische Übersicht zu diesem Thema präsentiert.

    Ausgehend von drei ausführlich analysierten Partien des verstorbenen Exweltmeisters Tigran Petrosjan, des "größten Qualitätsopferers" (Zitat S. 7), bietet der Autor zunächst jeweils 35 Testpartien leichteren Kalibers ("A") und gehobener positioneller Qualitätsopferkunst ("B") in Bezug auf aktiv durchgeführte Qualitätsopfer an, gefolgt von je 25 Beispielen ("A" und "B") für passiv angebotene Opfer (S. 13-59). Jede Partie, teilweise mit kurzen Anmerkungen im Informatorstil versehen, wird bis zum kritischen Punkt vorgeführt, und nach dem folgenden Stellungsdiagramm soll der Leser die Fortsetzung finden. Lösungen und Partieschlüsse finden sich dann im Anhang (S. 90-109).

    Ganz ähnlich konzipiert sind die beiden abschließenden Kapitel über Qualitätsopfer in der Sizilianischen Verteidigung (meistens sT x wSc3 bzw. wT x sSh5) und in anderen Eröffnungen, wiederum jeweils 35 Partien am Stück (S. 60-89). 43 Schach - Sinnsprüche lockern den Text auf; von diesen z. T. weniger bekannten Zitaten hat mir eines besonders gut gefallen: "Derjenige, der sich nicht so zum Schachspielen hinsetzt, daß er siegen will und siegen muß, sondern lediglich darauf hofft, daß ein Versehen des Gegners ihm später zu einem unerwarteten Punkt verhilft und der, der den Gegner für stärker hält, kann keine Erfolge erringen. Einem feigen Schachspieler bereitet das Wettkampf - Schach kein Vergnügen, sondern unangenehme, seelenquälende Anspannung (Maróczy)" (Zitat S. 51). Zudem findet sich im Anhang ein Register aller 190 aufgeführten Partien (S. 110-115), die aus einem Zeitraum von 150 Jahren bis hin zur Gegenwart ausgewählt wurden.

    Das Konzept des Büchleins erscheint bemerkenswert, liefert es doch in systematisierter Form auf knappem Raum eine Fülle von Material zum bisher in der Schachliteratur etwas stiefmütterlich behandelten Thema des Qualitätsopfers. Hie und da wäre jedoch weniger mehr gewesen, denn manchmal vermißt man schon tiefergehende Erläuterungen zum Spielgeschehen. Gleichwohl bildet der Band natürlich eine wahre Fundgrube an taktischen und positionellen Ideen, die mit dem Qualitätsopfer verbunden sind.

    Rochade Europa 11/99

    Mit diesem Buch legt Imre Pál eine Abhandlung über ein Thema vor, das in den meisten Lehrbüchern ein wenig zu kurz kommt, nämlich das Qualitätsopfer. Als Einstieg zeigen 3 kommentierte Partien Petrosjans, der für diese Spezialität geradezu berüchtigt war, das Qualitätsopfer in Angriff und Verteidigung.

    Dann folgt der Haupteil des Buches: 120 Testpartien, die in zwei Schwierigkeitsstufen und in die Kategorien "aktiv" und "passiv" unterteilt sind. Zu jeder Partie gibt es die Notation (teilweise knapp kommentiert) bis zum Qualitätsopfer sowie das entsprechende Diagramm. Nun ist es Aufgabe des Lesers, sich den Sinn des Qualitätsopfers sowie die weitere Zugfolge zu erarbeiten, die Lösungen mit den wichtigsten Varianten befinden sich im Anhang.

    Im dritten Teil des Buches gibt es 70 weitere Beispielpartien, in denen jeweils das Qualitätsopfer eine wichtige Rolle spielt. Im Unterschied zu Teil 2 gibt es hier die komplette Partienotation, außerdem wurden diese Partien nach der Eröffnung geordnet. Den Abschluß bildet ein Register aller 190 enthaltenen Partien. Für Auflockerung sorgen einige Zitate berühmter Schachspieler.

    Fazit: Das Buch bereitet sein interessantes Thema sowohl inhaltlich als auch in der Gestaltung sehr ansprechend auf, und auch der Preis geht mit 22,80 DM in Ordnung.

    Schach-Markt 1/2000
    http://www.schachversand.de/e/detai...

    ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖

    [Event "WC24/final"]
    [Site "ICCF"]
    [Date "2009.6.10"]
    [Round "-"]
    [White "Turgut, Tansel"]
    [Black "Kunzelmann, Dr. Fred"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [WhiteElo "2610"]
    [BlackElo "2464"]

    1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Bb7 5.Bg2 Bb4+
    6.Bd2 Bxd2+ 7.Qxd2 O-O 8.Nc3 d6 9.d5 e5 10.O-O a5 11.Qc2 Nbd7 12.a3 Qe7 13.Nd2 h6 14.e3 Ra6 15.b3 Rfa8 16.Nb5 Nc5 17.Nb1 Bc8 18.N1c3 Ne8 19.f4 Bd7 20.Rae1 Rb8 21.Re2 Raa8 22.fxe5 Qxe5 23.Ref2 Qxe3 24.Kh1 f5 <25.Rxf5> Bxf5 26.Qxf5 Nf6 27.b4 axb4 28.axb4 Nd3 29.Qe6+ Qxe6 30.dxe6 Ra6 31.Nxc7 Ra7 32.N3b5 Ra2 33.e7 Nxb4 34.Re1 Nd3 35.Bd5+ Kh7 36.Re6 Ne5 37.Kg1 Rc8 38.Rxf6 gxf6 39.Nxd6 Rb8 40.e8=Q Rxe8 41.Ncxe8 h5 42.Be4+ f5 43.Nxf5 Ra1+ 44.Kg2 Ra2+ 45.Kh3 Kg6 46.Nd4+ Kh6 47.Bd5 Rf2 48.Nd6 Rd2 49.N4f5+ Kg6 50.Ne3 Rb2 51.Ng2 Kg5 52.Ne1 Kf6 53.Nf3 Ng4 54.Bc6 Ke7 55.Nf5+ Kf6 56.N5d4 Ne3 57.Be8 Nxc4 58.Bxh5 b5 59.g4 Kg7 60.g5 b4 61.Kg3 b3 62.Bg4 1-0

    [Event "Ho Chi Minh City ch-VIE"]
    [Date "2010.??.??"]
    [White "Bui Vinh, "]
    [Black "Nguyen Huynh Minh Huy, "]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [WhiteElo "2480"]
    [BlackElo "2469"]
    [ECO "A28"]

    1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. d4 exd4 5. Nxd4 Bb4 6. g3 Ne4 7. Qd3 Nxc3 8. bxc3 Be7 9. Bg2 Ne5 10. Qe4 d6 11. f4 Nd7 12. O-O O-O 13. Ba3 Nb6 14. Qd3 c5 15. Nc2 Be6 16. Ne3 Qc7 17. Rab1 Rad8 18. f5 Bc8 19. f6 Bxf6 20. Rxf6 gxf6 21. Rxb6 Qxb6 22. Nd5 Qa5 23. Bc1 f5 24. Qe3 Kh8 25. Qe7 Rg8 26. Qf6 Rg7 27. h4 Be6 28. h5 h6 29. Bxh6 Rdg8 30. Bxg7 Rxg7 31. h6 1-0

    [Event "URS-ch27"]
    [Site "Leningrad"]
    [Date "1960.??.??"]
    [White "Bronstein, David I"]
    [Black "Petrosian, Tigran V"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [ECO "B10"]

    1. e4 c6 2. Ne2 d5 3. e5 c5 4. d4 Nc6 5. c3 e6 6. Nd2 Nge7 7. Nf3 cxd4 8. Nexd4 Ng6 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Bd3 Qc7 11. Qe2 f6 12. exf6 gxf6 13. Nd4 Kf7 14. f4 c5 15. Qh5 cxd4 16. Bxg6+


    click for larger view

    hxg6 17. Qxh8 dxc3 18. Qh7+ Bg7 19. Be3 cxb2 20. Rd1 Ba6 21. f5 exf5 22. Qh3 Qc2 23. Qf3 Bc4 0-1

    check also the following collections:

    - Game Collection: Exchange sacs - 1

    - Game Collection: Exchange sacs - 2

    - Game Collection: Exchange sacs - 3

    150 = pre WWI
    160 = 1914-1944
    174-177 = 1945-1979
    180 = 1980-1989
    190 = 1990-1999

    200-209 = 2000-2009
    300-306 = 2010-2016

    = = =

    People in Greenland can differentiate between 36 kinds of snow; the Swedish IM <Ari Ziegler> will teach you to differentiate between <20 kinds of exchange sacrifice>. His systematic approach to exchange sacrifices will rapidly enhance your understanding of one of the most exciting and difficult aspects of chess. Your widened horizon will help you to be able to follow the games of top GMs better and also to see more options in your own positions, which in turn will improve your chess results. https://shop.chessbase.com/en/produ...

    Der schwedische IM <Ari Ziegler> behandelt auf dieser DVD Möglichkeiten, Stellungsbewertungen durch ein Qualitätsopfer plötzlich zu verändern. In den meisten Schachspielern ist die Wertigkeit der Figuren fest verankert, man weiß, dass ein Turm mehr wert ist als eine Leichtfigur, er beträgt ungefähr das Äquivalent zu Leichtfigur und zwei Bauern. Somit kommt es nicht oft vor, dass man in seinen Partien so ein Qualitätsopfer überhaupt andenkt, spielt doch einfach die Angst vor dem Verlust einer Schwerfigur eine zu große Rolle. Zudem erscheinen die Möglichkeiten und Konsequenzen eines solchen Opfers oft nicht überschaubar. Welche Stellungen erlauben eigentlich so ein Qualitätsopfer? Wie kann man die Chance zu solch einer Spielweise in den eigenen Partien überhaupt erst erkennen? Reicht die Kompensation für den Verlust des Turmes aus oder führt der Tausch einfach schnell in ein verlorenes Endspiel? Diese und viele Fragen mehr beantwortet Ziegler auf dieser ausgesprochen gut gelungenen Mittelspiel-DVD.

    Der Autor zeigt nicht nur eine Ansammlung von Beispielen aus der Großmeisterpraxis, sondern er bespricht die Partien systematisch: Wie kann man die Qualität opfern, um eine Festungsstellung zu erlangen? Falls man eine Leichtfigur auf e3/e6 oder d3/d6 etablieren kann, ist dies oft mehr wert als der Verlust der Qualität. Trifft dies immer zu oder gibt es Ausnahmen? Wie kann man mittels eines Turmopfers die gegnerische Königsstellung ins Wanken bringen? Wieso kann Schwarz so oft in der sizilianischen Verteidigung einen Turm für den Springer auf c3 opfern? Warum ist das Läuferpaar + Bauer in der Regel genauso stark wie Turm und Springer des Gegners? Diese und etliche andere Fragen beantwortet Ziegler umfassend. Die gezeigten Beispiele sind meist aggressiver Art, d.h. die Partei, die das Material hergibt, bekommt dafür in der Regel eine sehr aktive Position mit Initiative und Angriffsmöglichkeiten, in der der zweite Turm des Gegners zumeist passiv ist und seine numerische Überlegenheit gegenüber der Leichtfigur des Gegners nicht ausspielen kann.

    Mich hat diese systematische Herangehensweise an dieses komplexe Mittelspielthema sehr angenehm überrascht. Hat man in der Vergangenheit öfter über Qualitätsopfer in Großmeisterpartien gestaunt und sich gefragt, wie man überhaupt auf so einen Gedanken kommt und wie sich der Spieler sicher sein kann, dass diese Spielweise in der Stellung funktioniert, erhält man hier selbst das Rüstzeug, um die Wertigkeit des Turmes neu einzuschätzen. Wenn man die Beispiele auf der DVD gesehen und verstanden hat, wird man sein Verständnis des Mittelspiels nachhaltig verbessern. Gewisse Stellungen werden dann unter einem anderen Blickwinkel gesehen werden, da man die Möglichkeit eines Qualitätsopfers in Betracht zieht, was einem womöglich sonst niemals in den Sinn gekommen wäre. Ziegler gibt dem Zuhörer einige Richtlinien an die Hand, damit dieser die Partie auch nach dem Qualitätsopfer richtig weiterspielen kann. Oft ist es nämlich derart, dass nach so einem unerwarteten Opfer der Gegner völlig aus dem Konzept gebracht wird und es nicht schafft, sich der neuen Situation anzupassen. Das macht Fehler sehr wahrscheinlich. Dieser psychologische Effekt, der ja mit einer zum Teil radikalen Stellungsänderung einhergeht, könnte im Prinzip nur mit einer neuen objektiven Betrachtung der Stellung neutralisiert werden, was aber oft nicht gelingt. Der Autor zeigt ein ums andere Mal Beispiele, die das belegen. Tatsache ist, dass man nicht auf das Material achtet und die scheinbar stärkere Figur opfert, sondern im Prinzip nur die Stellung in eine überlegene Position verwandelt. Wie man dann diese Positionen zum Sieg ausspielen kann, erklärt der Autor natürlich auch ausführlich.

    Ari Ziegler präsentiert die Stellungen meist in angenehm langsamer und ruhiger Art, sodass man den Kern der Sache versteht und dem Gesagten gut folgen kann, auch wenn er manchmal das Tempo anzieht und durch die Partien sprintet, aber dies ist natürlich auch der Menge des Materials geschuldet. Eine ausgezeichnete Darbietung eines schwierigen Mittelspielthemas, welches jedem Schachfreund einen Entwicklungsschub für sein eigenes Spiel geben sollte. Sehr empfehlenswert!

    Schach-Zeitung https://www.schachversand.de/d/deta...

    403 games, 1834-2017

  20. 55e_Middlegames - strategic OUTPOST !
    Approaches:

    * An <outpost> is a square where you can keep a piece where your opponent can’t capture the piece without giving up a material advantage.

    * <Outposts> can be one of the most important strategies in a chess game as it allows you to have a huge spacial advantage and puts constant pressure on your opponent’s position.

    * An <outpost> is a square of strategic importance, usually located on an open or semi-open file. This square hosts a piece which is supported by a pawn and cannot be dislodged by an enemy pawn.

    = = =

    * An <outpost> is a square on the fifth, sixth, or seventh rank which is protected by a pawn and which cannot be attacked by an opponent's pawn. Such a square is a hole for the opponent (Hooper & Whyld 1992)....

    * <Outposts> are a favourable position from which to launch an attack, particularly using a knight.

    * Knights are most efficient when they are close to the enemy's stronghold. This is because of their short reach, something not true of bishops, rooks and queens. They are also more effective in the centre of the board than on the edges. Therefore, the ideal to be aimed at is an <outpost> in one of the central (c, d, e or f) files in an advanced position (e.g. the sixth rank) with a knight.

    * Knowledge of <outposts> and their effectiveness is crucial in exploiting situations involving an isolated queen's pawn.

    On the other hand, <Nimzowitsch> argued when the <outpost> is in one of the flank (a, b, g and h) files the ideal piece to make use of the <outpost> is a rook. This is because the rook can put pressure on all the squares along the rank.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outpos...
    = = = = = =

    http://www.chess-game-strategies.co...

    https://www.sparkchess.com/mysterio...

    https://www.chess.com/forum/view/ge...

    = = =

    Collections on outposts: Game Collection Search

    57 games, 1894-2017

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