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Akiba Rubinstein vs Alexander Alekhine
"Rubin It In" (game of the day Jun-30-2015)
Karlsbad (1911), Karlsbad (Karlovy Vary) AUH, rd 23, Sep-21
Slav Defense: Suchting Variation (D15)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 40 times; par: 156 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jun-30-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <RandomVisitor>
In the Rybka analysis above, why 41. exf5 instead of the obvious <41. e5>? I have a hard time finding a draw after that.
Jun-30-15  RandomVisitor: <beatgiant>After 36.Kd3 Rc8 37.Rxc8 Kxc8 38.f3 Kb7 39.e4 a5 40.bxa6+ Kxa6 41.e5, R4 still cannot find the win for white...


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Analysis by Deep Rybka 4.1 x64: <TB6>

<[+0.33] d=31 41...Kb7> 42.Kc3 Kc6 43.Kc2 Kd7 44.Kb3 Kc6 45.Ka4 h6 46.Kb4 Kd7 47.Ka3 Ke6 48.Ka4 Kd7 49.Kb4 Kd8 50.Kb5 Kc7 51.Kb4 Kd7 52.Ka3 Ke6 53.Ka4 Kd7 54.Kb4 Kd8 55.Kb5 Kc7 56.Kb4 Kd7

Jul-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <RandomVisitor>
From your diagram above, 41...Kb7 <42. Kc3> Kc6 43. Kb4 Kc7 44. Kb5 Kb7 45. e6 Kc7 46. e7 Kd7 47. Kxb6 Kxe7 48. Kc5 Ke6 49. Kc6 h6 50. Kc5 and Black will soon be in zugzwang.
Jul-01-15  RandomVisitor: <beatgiant>R4 would delay recapture with 47...h5
Jul-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <RandomVisitor>
Then couldn't White play 48. Kc5 picking up the d-pawn, which eventually costs Black his kingside?
Jul-01-15  RandomVisitor: <beatgiant>

1: Akiba Rubinstein - Alexander Alekhine, Karlsbad 1911


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Analysis by Deep Rybka 4.1 x64:

1. (-#23): 48.Kc5 g5 49.fxg5 f4 50.gxf4 Kxe7 51.Kxd5 h4 52.g6 Kf6 53.g7 Kxg7 54.f5

2. (-#20): 48.e8N Kxe8 49.Ka5 Kf7 50.Kb5 Ke7 51.Kb4 Kd7 52.Kc5 Ke6 53.Kb4 Kd7 54.Kc5 Ke6 55.Kb4 Kd7 56.Kc5 Ke6 57.Kb4 Kd7 58.Kc5 Ke6 59.Kb4 Kd7 60.Kc5 Ke6 61.Kb4 Kd7 62.Kc5 Ke6 63.Kb4

3. (-#20): 48.e8R Kxe8 49.Ka5 Kf7 50.Kb5 Ke7 51.Kb4 g5 52.fxg5 f4 53.gxf4 Kf7 54.Kc3 h4 55.Kd3 h3 56.Kc2 h2 57.f5 h1Q 58.Kd2 Qxf3 59.Kc2 Ke7 60.Kb1 Qxf5+ 61.Ka1

4. (-#20): 48.e8Q+ Kxe8 49.Ka5 Kf7 50.Kb5 Ke7 51.Kb4 Kd7 52.Kc5 Ke6 53.Kb4 Kd7 54.Kc5 Ke6 55.Kb4 Kd7 56.Kc5 Ke6 57.Kb4 Kd7 58.Kc5 Ke6 59.Kb4 Kd7 60.Kc5 Ke6 61.Kb4 Kd7 62.Kc5 Ke6 63.Kb4

5. (-#20): 48.Kb7 Kxe7 49.Kc6 Ke6 50.Kb5 g5 51.fxg5 f4 52.gxf4 h4 53.Kb6 h3 54.Kb5 Kf7 55.Kc6 h2 56.g6+ Kf6 57.Kd6 h1Q 58.Kc7 Qxf3 59.Kb7 Qxf4 60.Ka8 Kxg6 61.Ka7 Qxd4+ 62.Kb8

6. (-#20): 48.Kb5 Kxe7 49.Kb4 Kd7 50.Kc5 Ke6 51.Kb4 Kd7 52.Kc5 Ke6 53.Kb4 Kd7 54.Kc5 Ke6 55.Kb4 Kd7 56.Kc5 Ke6 57.Kb4 Kd7 58.Kc5 Ke6 59.Kb4 Kd7 60.Kc5 Ke6 61.Kb4 Kd7 62.Kc5 Ke6 63.Kb4

(, 01.07.2015)

Jul-01-15  RandomVisitor: <beatgiant>black goes on a suicidal pawn launch, which magically works out...
Jul-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <RandomVisitor>
Ah, I missed Black's counterplay with <...g5> and that kills the whole line for White. So your computer may be right about no win after 36. Kd3.
Jul-01-15  RandomVisitor: <beatgiant>I am going to reset for a long run on 36.Kd3 and will post results sometime tomorrow.
Jul-01-15  RandomVisitor: R4 still can not find the win after the proposed improvement 36.Kd3 Rc8!:


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Analysis by Deep Rybka 4.1 x64:

<[+0.48] d=35 37.Rxc8> Kxc8 38.f3 Kb7 39.e4 a5 40.bxa6+ Kxa6 41.exf5 gxf5 42.g4 Kb7 43.Kc3 Kc6 44.Kb3 Kd7 45.Ka4 Kc8 46.Kb4 Kd7 47.Kb5 Kc7 48.Ka4 Kc8 49.Kb4 Kd7 50.Kb5 Kc7 51.Ka4 Kc8 52.Kb4

Dec-25-15  joddon: how can a great player like alex leave his queen sitting on a square waiting for the queen excahnge....todays elite play a more dynamic game not waiting for the endgame to end with pawns and rooks.....i think playing dubious moves like bxb the way he does and not showing any major skill as a great tactician as he was proves there must have been some serious probelms on the side.....i think his alcoholsim started top play a role by this time.
Nov-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: After all the analyzing here of White's improvement 36.Kd3 Rc8 33.Rxc8 etc. winning the K+P ending then clearly at move 34 White would have been a move up in this ending if he'd played 34.Rxd6 Kxd6 35.Rc6+ Kd7 36.f3 Maybe he needed moves to make a time control at move 40.
Nov-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Game position after move 38.


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Shereshevsky claims that the K+P ending after 39.Rxe6 is drawn. 39.Rxe6 Kxe6 40.g5 (Does not look right closing the K-side but not 40.e4? dxe4+ 41.fxe4 fxg4 drawing easily.) Kd6 41.e4 Ke6 42.exd5+ forced else the WK has no entry into Black's position 42...Kxd5 43.Kc3 Ke6 44.Kc4 Kd6 45.d5 Kd7 46.Kd4 Kd6 and White cannot win the oppositon. Drawn.


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But he overlooks 40.gxf5! gxf5 41.e4 and now either Black allows e4-e5 then gets outflanked on the K-side.


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Or else he exchanges on e4 twice and the same thing happens. As we know, the defender cannot capture passed pawns one file apart - as long as the attacker is careful. 40...Kxf5 is no better.


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White runs his K to g4 then plays e3-e4-e5 followed by f4-f5 and yet again mops up the K-side. 41.Ke2 h6 42.Kf2 Kf6 43.Kg3 Kf5 44.Kh4 Kf6 45.e4 Ke6 46.Kg4 Kf6 47.e5+ Ke6 48.f5+.


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Nov-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Position after 40.Rh1.


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The winning plan is K-march to g5 but White "tortures" his opponent first. Shereshevsky recommends such practice as good technique. It can lull the opponent into believing his position is impregnable.

Nov-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Position after 50.Kh4.


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White threatens Kg5 and wins f5 so Black's next 50...h6 is forced. Having created a significant weakening of the K-side then, given passive defence, WK retreats to d3 where it not only defends the e-pawn but also supports its advance. This frees the R to attack the K-side pawns.

Nov-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Position after 51...h5.


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Black counter-attacks and the plan of K-march to d3 is no longer appropriate. White is now positionally winning and knows he must attack the multiple Black weaknesses. The best way to do this is gxf5 with or without Ra3 first but White stumbles a little and gives Alekhine a chance.

Nov-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Position after 53...fxg4!


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Black sets a trap and has suddenly become active after a long period of having no counter-play at all. Now if 54.Kxg6 g3 55.Kxh7 g2 56.Rc1 h4 and it is Black who wins! Shereshevsky.

Nov-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Postion after 55...Rh1!


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Passive defence would lose. The WK forces its way to f7 then exchanges Rooks by distraction. Spielmann. But Black is fighting and no longer clearly lost. Not only can he attack b5 from the rear and maybe defend the g-pawn but there is a potential mating tactic to hand! If Ra3 Kd7-e6; Kxg6 Rg1+ forces WK to the h-file.

Nov-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Position after 57...Rxb5? The losing move.


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Black should have played 57...Ke6 58.Rxa7 Rg1+ and ...Re1 going for the e-pawn instead. If White plays Ra3 to defend it BK comes in to e4. 57...Ke6! 58.Rxa7 Rg1+ 59.Kh4 Re1 60.Ra3 Kf5 61.Kg3 Ke4.


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Nov-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <manselton>
Thanks a lot! Now I'll have to look at the whole thing all over again ;-)
Nov-17-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: You are welcome <beatgiant> :) Position after 64...Rg4+.


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White can still go wrong 65.Kf8 gives Black the time to grab the d-pawn then sac his R for the f-pawn and White ends up having to sac his R in turn for the b-pawn. So first WK drives BR off the 4th rank and only then goes to f8.

Nov-17-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Position after 76.Rc7!


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Careful to the end. This is stronger than 76.f8=Q. Now if ...Re4+ 77.Kd7 and White will win the d-pawn. Shereshevsky.

Nov-17-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Position after 51...h5 again.


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I said above that White ought to play 52.gxf5 rather than 52.Kh4. That ought to have had some explanation. 52.gxf5 gxf5 53.Kh4 Rg7


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OK Black will mop up White's 3rd rank pawns but the WR can equally mow a7 and b6 while his King invades the Black position. For example, 54.Kxh5 Rg3 55.Ra3 Rxf3 56.Rxa7+ Ke6 57.Rb7 Rxe3 58.Rxb6+ Kd7 59.Kg5 Re4 60.Kxf5.


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White still has to be a little bit careful. a) 60...Rxd4 61.Ke5 Re4+ 62.Kxd5 Rxf4 63.Rxc6 is a standard winning position. b) 60...Kc7 61.Rf6 (in fact most any R-move wins easily.) 61...Rxd4 62.b6+ and if 62...Kb7 63.Rd6 is game over.

Nov-17-18  Howard: Wasn't this endgame analyzed in Learn from the Legends ?
Feb-22-20  SpiritedReposte: Rook endings always curious.
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