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Max Weiss vs Joseph Henry Blackburne
6th American Chess Congress (1889), New York, NY USA, rd 26, Apr-26
Scandinavian Defense: Main Lines. Mieses Variation (B01)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Feb-09-05  chess man: Nice endgame by Blackburne.
Aug-13-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Chessical: Blackburne could still have stumbled just before the end with:

<48...Kf3?> 49.Bxg5 Kxg4 < when there is 50.Be3!!> Bd6 (50...Bxe3 51.Kb4 =) 51.Kb3=

Nov-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <Chessical> Your point is correct, but there's no need for the pyrotechnic 50.Be3!!. Any move of the bishop to a safe square will work; once the White king blockades on b3 it can never be dislodged.
Sep-15-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <Chessical: Blackburne could still have stumbled just before the end with: <48...Kf3?> 49.Bxg5 *** >

A more plausible way for Black to throw away the win at move 48 would have been 48...Be7? 49.Bxg5 Bxg5 50.Kb4=, as pointed out in "The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played" by Irving Chernev (Dover Publications, 1992, p. 144).

Sep-15-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: The moves given for this game in "The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played" by Irving Chernev (Dover Publications, 1992, pp. 142-144) differ for White at moves 42 (Bd2) and 43 (Bc3). If those are the correct moves, then at move 49 (with the White King on b3 rather than c3), Weiss could have tried 49. Bc3 [not mentioned in Chernev's annotations], which seems to afford better drawing chances than his actual 49. Be1, for example, 49.Bc3 Kd5 (49...Kf4 50.Kb4 Kxg4 51.Bf6=) 50.Kb4 Kc6 51.Bf6 Bd2+ 52.Kb3 Kd5 53.Bd8 Kd6 54.Bf6 Kd7 55.Kc2 Bf4 56.Kb3 Kc6 57.Bd8 and Black does not seem to be able to make progress.
Sep-15-07  Calli: The tournament book, Olms Reprint 1982, gives 42.B-B2 P-B4 43.K-B3 in English descriptive which is 42.Bf2 f5 43.Kc3 in algebraic. It appears that the Chessgames score is correct. I wonder where Chernev copied the game from.
Sep-15-07  Calli: Of course, if 42.Bd2?, the king invades 42...Kd4 43.Kc2 and its an easy win via b4, b3 etc.
Feb-10-10  backrank: Blackburne is remembered best as a very fierce and sharp attacking player. However, many examples show that he was also a great positional and endgame player. He played quite a number of instructive endgames like this.
Oct-29-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jonathan Sarfati: Chernev also gave Weiss' revenge game Blackburne vs Max Weiss, 1889 as a great example of exploiting the ♗-pair.
Dec-06-14  Knight13: <Jonathan Sarfati: Chernev also gave Weiss' revenge game Blackburne vs Max Weiss, 1889 as a great example of exploiting the ♗-pair.> This game took place in round 26. The game in the link you provided was played in round 6. Weiss's future-past reverse-revenge game perhaps?

White's best chance to castle Queenside after h4 seems to be 13. Bd2: ... Nf6 14. Qxd8 Rxd8 15. O-O-O Bf5--not very pretty but far from unplayable.

Feb-11-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  GrahamClayton: Unusual postion after 37...♗d6, with every Black piece on the 6th rank:


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