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Geza Maroczy vs Savielly Tartakower
"Geza Stripped" (game of the day Sep-02-2008)
Teplitz-Schönau (1922), Teplice-Sanov CSR, rd 4, Oct-05
Dutch Defense: Rubinstein Variation (A84)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-02-08  TheaN: <YetAnotherAmateur&Phoni Benoni: Could someone brighter than me come up with a good reason for 11. Bb2? All I can think of is that Maroczy is going for the standard fianchetto move, but that makes no sense to me in this situation due to the immobile d-pawn blocking in the bishop.

PB: With the bishop on b2, White is anticipating that Black may try to open the position with ...c5 or ...e5, when White can get his d-pawn out of the way. Things didn't work out as the game went, but it was probably the best idea at the time.>

Actually, it seems White was trying a Colle-Zukertort-like setup, which completely drawbacks if White loses control over e4 or c4 (and thus with the Dutch). As this is the case at that move already for e4, White should've come up with something else, although I don't know what. White is already worse.

Sep-02-08  PinnedPiece: Why not
21. Rg2 where does the queen do better than ..Qxe3
22. Be2 does black have a better move than ...g3?
23. Nf1 and it looks like white will be ok, no?


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Sep-02-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <PinnedPiece> A different way to play would be ...

21. Rg2 Qh6+ 22.Kg1 (forced) Qxe3+ 23. Kh1 Qh6+ 24. Kg1 (forced) Bf4 (threatening Be3+) 25. Re1


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Black's pieces look to be well posted. The f4 bishop stops the white rooks from driving black's queen away. But I guess black has nothing more than a slight edge here. Fritz evaluates as -0.9.

Sep-02-08  Underworld: I really don't consider this all that big of a spectacle. It is a nice game with cool sacrifices, but it is what is expected out of a stonewall attack, which is what the dutch defense is when going on an attack. What I find most awesome about this game is only the year that it was played. This is the usual that I see when observing stonewall games.
Jul-27-10  muwatalli: <This is the usual that I see when observing stonewall games.> how many games have you seen in the stonewall variation of the dutch defense, 1?
Aug-13-10  sevenseaman: My gut feeling is Maroczy is a very good player. Sadly I've not yet come across a winning game of his. Some day!
Aug-13-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: <sevenseamen> Have a look at

Maroczy vs Pillsbury, 1896

and

G Marco vs Maroczy, 1899

Apr-25-11  psmith: <dhotts>, <crafty>, <chessgames.com>

25. Rg2 Rf8 looks better than 25...Bc7 to me.

Jul-07-11  LIFE Master AJ: Tartakower's greatest brilliancy.
Feb-16-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: A rook sac with an eventual win.
Sep-22-13  RandomVisitor: After 17.Rxh2


click for larger view

Rybka 4.1 x64:

[-0.51] d=22 18.Kxh2 Qxf2+ 19.Kh1 Nf6 20.Re2 Qxg3 21.cxd5 cxd5 22.Nb1 Qh4+ 23.Rh2 Qg5 24.Rg2 g3 25.Be2 Bd7 26.Nc3 a6 27.Rf1 h5 28.Nd1 Kh8 29.Qd2 Qh6 30.Bc3 h4 31.Qe1 Rg8

Sep-22-13  psmith: <RandomVisitor> I honestly think that this is a position where just letting a program run for however long you like, then just giving its evaluation at the end, is more than useless. Why does Black play 21...cxd5 instead of the seemingly more natural 21...exd5 in this line? And what happens after 22. Nb1 Nh5, as in the game? This line just leaves far too many questions unanswered to really help us to understand what is going on in this position.
Sep-22-13  psmith: (Besides which in the final position from Rybka's line White is pretty horribly tied up. I would happily take that position as Black and think it is probably outright winning.)
Sep-22-13  RandomVisitor: <psmith>The computer evaluation is a useful starting point for further human understanding. I am curious only with what white's best play happens to be - perhaps white had a missed opportunity to put up stronger resistance.

[-0.60] d=23 18.Kxh2 Qxf2+ 19.Kh1 Nf6 20.Re2 Qxg3 21.cxd5 cxd5 22.Nb1 Qh4+ 23.Rh2 Qg5 24.Rg2 g3 25.Be2 Bd7 26.Qd2 h5 27.Bc3 h4 28.Bb4 Bc7 29.Rc1 Rc8 30.Rxc7 Rxc7 31.Bd6 Rc8 32.Bf4 Qf5 33.Nc3

Sep-22-13  psmith: What does Rybka think after 21. cxd5 exd5?
Sep-22-13  psmith: (I think that unless forced Black should not play Qh4+ too early. Instead after 21. cxd5 exd5 Black should just play something like ...Nh5, ...Bd7 and ... Rf8, bringing more pieces in. And cxd5 seems just to give the white squared B more influence.) For example, 21. cxd5 exd5 22. Nb1 Nh5 23. Ree1 Be6 24. Qg2 Qh4+ 25. Kg1 Rf8 and I think Black is on top. For example 26. Be2 Rf3!
Sep-22-13  RandomVisitor: <psmith>21.cxd5 exd5 there is 22.Nc4!? dxc4 23.d5 white gets some counterplay 23...Qh4+ 24.Kg1 c5 25.Qc3 cxb3 26.Qxf6 Qxf6 27.Bxf6
Sep-23-13  psmith: <RandomVisitor> That's nice, and helps to explain the preference for 21...cxd5.
Sep-23-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  andrewjsacks: Fascinating game, should be better known.
Sep-23-13  psmith: <RandomVisitor> I suppose the difference after 21...cxd5 is that if White tries 22. Nc4?! Black will be able to play 22...dxc4 23. d5 e5 blocking the a1-h8 diagonal... for example 24. bxc4 Bc5 25. Qb3 Nh5 and the attack continues.
Sep-28-13  RandomVisitor: A final look after 17.Rxh2


click for larger view

Rybka 4.1 x64:

[-0.86] d=26 18.Kxh2 Qxf2+ 19.Kh1 Nf6 20.Re2 Qxg3 <21.c5> Bc7 22.Nc4 Qh4+ 23.Rh2 Bxh2 24.Qxh2 Qxh2+ 25.Kxh2 dxc4 26.bxc4 Kg7 27.Bg2 Bd7 28.Kg3 Re8 29.Rb1 Kg6 30.Kh4 b6 31.cxb6 axb6 32.Rf1

May-17-15  Eduardo Bermudez: "A thorough understanding of the typical mating continuations makes the most complicated sacrificial combinations leading up to them not only difficult, but almost a matter of course." Tartakower
May-17-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Dionysius1: Surely "not only NOT difficult..."
Apr-10-17  bkpov: 31.Bg3 is poor defence. Rd2!
Apr-13-20  ellenliisbet: Ben Finegold has covered this game here: https://youtu.be/eLXMFXDq94k?t=958 enjoy!
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