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Carlos Torre Repetto vs Alexander Alekhine
Baden-Baden (1925), Baden-Baden GER, rd 1, Apr-16
English Opening: Symmetrical. Anti-Benoni Variation (A31)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Apr-19-05  paladin at large: What is this? Does anyone know the tournament situation and how it may have influenced them to agree to a draw after 13 and a half moves?
Apr-19-05  aw1988: Most likely the same conditions as Tartakower vs A Kramer, 1928
May-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <paladin at large: <What is this? Does anyone know the tournament situation >>

First round game. Unsusual wording in Tarrasch's Tournament book:

'Auf Vorschlag von Weiß als remis abgebrochen.'

May-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Pawn and Two: From the book, "The Life and Games of Carlos Torre": <Here Torre offered a draw. His position is good enough that Alekhine did not hesitate an instant to accept.>

In the tournament book, "Baden Baden 1925, International Chess Tournament", a comment by Zubarev: <Of course, even in the final position White's game is rather preferable. However, the fact that Alekhine accepted the offer of a draw needs to be explained not by this circumstance, but by the impression which it seems the Mexican's previous play had made on the grandmaster.>

May-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: "The draw was agreed on White's proposal. Of course, even in the final position White's game is rather preferable. However, the fact that Alekhine accepted the offer of a draw needs to be explained not by circumstance, but by the impression which it seems the Mexican's previous play had made on the grandmaster." --

Suburov in Grekov's Russian Tournament book as translated by Jimmy Adams.

Calli's irreverent translation --- mutual fear!

May-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: <Pawn and Two> I can't believe we posted that at almost the exact same time!

May-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Tarrasch' formulation is

"On white's proposal the game was <broken off> as draw.",

so I assume there is a little story behind it.

May-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Pawn and Two: <Calli> That was an interesting coincidence. Several times we posted on the same game, but posting nearly the same information at almost the same time was certainly unusual.

After the tournament, both Alekhine and Torre may have been satisfied with their draw decision.

Fritz indicates White has only a slight advantage after 14.Bxd5. At 21 ply Fritz prefers 14...Rb8, although several other moves are playable.

By agreeing to the draw, Alekhine may have gained the rest needed for winning his next 9 games in a row. After this winning streak, Alekhine maintained his lead for the remainder of the tournament.

Considering Alekhine's great form in this tournament, Torre may have considered a draw was a pretty good result. Alekhine's final score was +12 =8. Also, the draw was worth a precious 1/2 point, which enabled Torre to win the 10th prize, with a score of +5-4=11.

May-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: My speculation is that Alekhine was always aware of his opponents history, but he probably didn't know Torre at all. He was surprised how well he played the opening, so he readily agreed to the draw. Torre was probably just nervous.

Need help on a translation: http://picasaweb.google.com/Caissa1...

Don't even know what language. Serb?

May-05-08  RookFile: Well, in the final position, white is a little better. I don't see black losing this, though.
May-05-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Calli> postcard

Text above the yellow bear is <The cleverer give in.> as question. It's written in old German script (so called 'Sütterlin' which was used/taught 1915-1941).

May-05-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: <whiteshark> Thank you! I had no idea. Changed to "more clever". Perhaps there is a better English expression, now that I know the idea. Is the text at lower left readable? Click magnifying glass for enlargement.
May-05-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Bishoprick: But why is this game of such interest to so many?
May-05-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Calli> I'm sorry, but I can read only the few unchanged/similar letters and than puzzle for the rest of the words. But here I've nothing.
May-05-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: Sehr Gut. Nein, ich dachte nicht, dass 1915 Sie ein 'Sütterlin' Student waren {;-)
Oct-26-11  Mozart72: Any attacking piece or advancing piece on Black's side would make White's positional strength grow. On 13.Nd5 Nxd5, Whites material value is 31.9, Black's: 32.6. If 32.6 - 31.9 = 0.7, rounded to the nearest whole number = 1. And one in the standard chess relative value scale is equal to a pawn. Black has a theoretical pawn as an advantage and after 14.Bxd5, Black's material value drops to 29.9. You can't substract 31.9 - 29.9 = 2, because 2 = 1 + 1 = P + P. And you can't have seven pawns plus two theoretical pawns on either side, in this case on White's side as material advantage. So, the problem lies on what move can Black make to maintain its theoretical pawn advantage over White's positional strength.
Jul-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  mifralu: <whiteshark: Tarrasch' formulation is "On white's proposal the game was <broken off> as draw.", so I assume there is a little story behind it.>

Aljechin äußerte sich über die Partie: "Der Mann kann ein Genie sein. Wäre die Partie in der 2. Runde zu spielen gewesen, so hätte ich sie vielleicht nicht remis gegeben."

Karlsruher Tagblatt 17. April 1925 Abendausgabe Seite 4

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