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Alexander Alekhine vs Friedrich Saemisch
Baden-Baden (1925), Baden-Baden GER, rd 11, Apr-29
English Opening: Symmetrical. Anti-Benoni Variation (A31)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 8 times; par: 95 [what's this?]

Annotations by Stockfish (Computer).      [21461 more games annotated by Stockfish]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Feb-07-05  Saruman: :-) Alekhine even allows 52.-Nc3+ 53.Kc2 Nxe4 54.h7 and the pawn promotes.
Mar-04-07  ivanov90: 21. Rxe6?
Better is 21.Rxd5 Nxd5 22.Bc4 Rad8 23.Bxd5+ Ke8 24.Rd1 with attack

24...c4? is Saemicsh's mistake. 24...Qa1+! was only move. For example, 25.Kc2 Rd8 26.d6 Nd5 27.Qc4 Rxd6 28.Qxc5 Rd7!

Mar-04-07  HannibalSchlecter: What I love about Alekhine is how he could switch gears from testosterone attacks to estrogen quiet simplification in the same game.
Jun-23-09  WhiteRook48: I hate 1...c5
Jun-17-11  dull2vivid: Nxe7!!! the shot heard around the world

Although, instead of Rxa6, Rxd5 might have been stronger...

Oct-02-13  Alpinemaster: <HannibalSchlecter: What I love about Alekhine is how he could switch gears from testosterone attacks to estrogen quiet simplification in the same game.>

Wow... the Polgar sisters would just love you.

Dec-04-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: If the score is correct--and there is some question about that--both sides botched the finale. The problem begins after <48.b4>:


click for larger view

Now <48...Ke6?!> just made it too easy for White, as 49.Bg8+ is game-set-match immediately. Instead, Alekhine's <49.Kd1?> gave Black a study-like chance: 49...Nc3+ 50.Kd2 Nxb5 51.Bxf5+ Kf6!


click for larger view

And the position is a draw! Ask your Friendly Neighborhood Tablebase if you don't believe. Indeed, I would encourage you to try and win it: the knight is a magician.

Instead, after <49...Kd6?> White had no trouble picking up the point. Hard to know what was the cause of this, and that's why the score is somewhat in question. Perhaps Alekhine was sober and Saemisch had too much time on his hands.

Dec-05-14  jvv: After 22. ... Rxa8! black wins.
Dec-05-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <If the score is correct--and there is some question about that-->

Who's asking?

Jul-30-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Chessdreamer: Alekhine's book "On the Road to the World Championship 1923-1927" has 45.Bxh7 1-0 as the last move of the game.

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