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Jose Raul Capablanca vs Alexander Alekhine
"Phi Beta Capa" (game of the day Dec-14-2013)
Savorin Cup (1913), St Petersburg RUE, rd 1, Dec-14
Semi-Slav Defense: Quiet Variation (D30)  ·  1-0

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Jose Raul Capablanca vs Alexander Alekhine (1913) Phi Beta Capa


Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 10 OF 10 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-17-13  Naniwazu: Interestingly enough at the time this game was played Capablanca and Alekhine were very close friends; it's only later after their WC match that they became 'enemies'. Capablanca taught Alekhine a lot about how to play simple positions.
Dec-17-13  aliejin: "Capablanca and Alekhine were very close friends"

Correct. Severe London rules, especially budget, I think it was the first episode of distancing

Then, losing the match, that match took place without incident, Capablanca did not even deign to appear
end at the ceremony and congratulate his opponent.

Dec-17-13  RedShield: <"Capablanca and Alekhine were very close friends"

Correct.>

Being on friendly terms with someone does not make you their friend, let alone close friend.

Dec-17-13  RedShield: <morfishine: <RedShield> Sure, I guess you are not reading the posts: Capablanca vs Alekhine, 1913>

One from 34 games? If the match was as sloppy as you suggest, another 50 should be the order of the day. Don't disappoint me.

Dec-18-13  RookFile: Yeah, I don't think Alekhine and Capa went out on social occasions together. Just that they were friendly enough to each other early on.
Dec-18-13  Naniwazu: <RedShield: <"Capablanca and Alekhine were very close friends"

Correct.>

Being on friendly terms with someone does not make you their friend, let alone close friend.>

My source is Botvinnik's autobiography 'Achieving the Aim' (Pergamon Press, 1981, p. 90): <Alekhine's understanding of complex positions was on a very high level but what about simple ones? Here Alekhine had a schooling from his older friend - they were inseperable in the period of the second decade of the century when Capablanca represented Cuba in Petersburg. The struggle for the world championship made them enemies.>

Dec-18-13  aliejin: We speak of friends in the terms in which chess players contacted occasionally may be.

According Panov in his book "Capablanca", Alekhine and Capablanca during 1914 in St. petersburg occasionally came out
at night to have fun

Dec-20-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: < MarkFinan: <morfishine: I really don't know what to say about Capablanca. At least for me, its hard to get excited about his style.>

Perfect! I had to wait for someone else more knowledgeable on chess matters to say it first. His endgames are very... precise. But precise doesn't make exciting. There is one game of Capablanca's I love though (but I'm expecting someone to say this wasn't him now.. if they know what game I refer to?). There's a constant threat of a simple back rank mate yet he has a rook on the 7th rank gobbling up pawns and for reasons I can't remember the black king couldn't take the rook. I'm being very vague, but im positive KC made a video of the game showing that it was a forced mate in 7 at the position black resigned...>

This is the game: Steinitz vs Von Bardeleben, 1895

Dec-20-13  RedShield: <We speak of friends in the terms in which chess players contacted occasionally may be.

According Panov in his book "Capablanca", Alekhine and Capablanca during 1914 in St. petersburg occasionally came out at night to have fun>

Yes, in which case my point stands: they were never <very close friends>.

Dec-20-13  aliejin: <Yes, in which case my point stands>

Sure
At the highest level of individual competitive activities there is no no room for close friendships. It was never so and never will be

Dec-20-13  Petrosianic: Speaking of Capa and Alekhine's one-time friendship, and apropos of nothing, really, there used to be a gag story about Alekhine telling about meeting an old man during St. Petersburg, who claimed he had an absolutely unstoppable attack that would allow White to win every time. Alekhine didn't believe it, but the old man showed it to him and beat him three straight with it.

Alekhine couldn't believe it so he called in Capablanca, and the old man beat him too, every time. The guy Alekhine is telling the story to says "Wow, what happened to that guy?", and Alekhine says "We killed him."

Dec-20-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: They annihilated him Zeta-style!
Dec-20-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Mark Finan>

Here are a couple of possibilities, though neither seems to fit your description as well as <offramp>'s candidate.

Alatortsev vs Capablanca, 1935

O Bernstein vs Capablanca, 1914

Dec-20-13  MarkFinan: Steinitz vs Von Bardeleben, 1895

Keypusher. Found the game I was looking for mate. Unusually I got the players name wrong, and various other minor details, lol.

Dec-20-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: < MarkFinan: Steinitz vs Von Bardeleben, 1895

Keypusher. Found the game I was looking for mate. Unusually I got the players name wrong, and various other minor details, lol.>

Don't mention it.

Dec-21-13  MarkFinan: <offramp: < MarkFinan: <morfishine: I really don't know what to say about Capablanca. At least for me, its hard to get excited about his style.> Perfect! I had to wait for someone else more knowledgeable on chess matters to say it first. His endgames are very... precise. But precise doesn't make exciting. There is one game of Capablanca's I love though (but I'm expecting someone to say this wasn't him now.. if they know what game I refer to?). There's a constant threat of a simple back rank mate yet he has a rook on the 7th rank gobbling up pawns and for reasons I can't remember the black king couldn't take the rook. I'm being very vague, but im positive KC made a video of the game showing that it was a forced mate in 7 at the position black resigned...>

This is the game: Steinitz vs Von Bardeleben, 1895>

Offramp. Sorry mate, I totally missed that post! Thank you.

Dec-21-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: I understand the idea of not being thrilled with Capa's style. But the 19th century afficionados disliked Steinitz, and as successful as Kramnik is, I find him a bit boring too. I know we should just accept that some players play good, solid chess and that style is successful for them, but there's something about an Alekhine or Tal or Kaspy that just thrills me much more than the more solid players.
Dec-21-13  MarkFinan: Totally agree with you there Elvis. I love the so called "Hollywood players", I think Nakamura is a good example of a modern day type of that player. I've recently been going through some of RubinStein's game's, and find his games enjoyable too. Tal, Morphy, Fischer, *Alekhine*, Kasparov, Carlsen, and a few IM's too are the most enjoyable players games I like to go through. I find there's some really exciting chess at IM level! But out of them all I can't seperate Kasparov and Carlsen.

Although who would want to, especially if one of them was kicking the others head in, I JOKE.

Jul-23-14  SpiritedReposte: Alekhine looks miffed in that photo lol.

Just needs a thought bubble for Capa that reads "You mad bro?" Haha

Dec-14-14  TheFocus: Exhibition match game 1 played in St. Petersburg, Russia on December 14, 1913.

Capablanca would win by +2=0-0.

Sep-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: In that picture I think Alekhine looks like the lead singer of a failed British New Romantic band.
Nov-04-16  jsteward: Why 31......Re5?!
Nov-04-16  JimNorCal: offramp: < MarkFinan: <morfishine: I really don't know what to say about Capablanca. At least for me, its hard to get excited about his style.> ... There is one game of Capablanca's I love though ... This is the game: Steinitz vs Von Bardeleben, 1895

Sure, that's totally my fave Capa game too. Wait. What?

Jul-09-17  Lossmaster: Answering Penguincw's almost 4-year old question: <Even though the larger board displays the final position, what's the actual position on the chessboard?> From a high-quality large print of this photo in a book of mine, I can positively say that the position is after Capablanca's 18th move Be4 (even though, judging only from the players' attitudes, you would think that it's Capa's turn to play). It's the move of which he said: "This move I considered a very long time. It looks very simple and inoffensive, yet it is the foundation of the whole attack against Black's position." (You can read more Capa comment in birthtimes' kibitz of Sep-01-09.) By the way, the time displayed on the clocks is crystal clear: it's 4:14 on Alekhine's clock and 3:54 on Capa's side.
Jul-09-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <Lossmaster>
Interesting. So this is a photo of the post-mortem?
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