chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing
Jose Raul Capablanca vs Alexander Alekhine
"Cambridge Springs Eternal" (game of the day Nov-20-2016)
Capablanca - Alekhine World Championship Match (1927), Buenos Aires ARG, rd 7, Sep-30
Queen's Gambit Declined: Cambridge Springs Variation (D52)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 61 times; par: 48 [what's this?]

Get this game explained with Decode Chess
explore this opening
find similar games 48 more Capablanca/Alekhine games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: All games have a Kibitzer's Corner provided for community discussion. If you have a question or comment about this game, register a free account so you can post there.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-16-17  JimNorCal: What happened to O Bernstein?
I thought he became a lawyer in order to avoid poverty as a chess player?
Dec-16-17  Retireborn: Bernstein was a successful lawyer in Moscow, but lost his fortune in the 1917 revolution. In the thirties he was a successful lawyer in Paris, but lost his fortune when the Nazis invaded (fled to Spain and returned to Paris after the war, according Hooper & Whyld.)
Dec-16-17  WorstPlayerEver: Weird. Good old Ossip plays the IBM tournament at age 78 (1961)

https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wik...

Aug-24-18  WorstPlayerEver: 22. Qd3 was more accurate:

22. Qd3 Qe6 23. Rg1 Qxb3 24. Rd8 Qb6 25. Re8 Ke8 26. Rg7 Kf8 27. Rh7


click for larger view

22. Qd3 Qe6 23. Rg1 Qf6 24. Rg3 Be6 25. Qb5


click for larger view

Jun-14-19  Helios727: In Golombek's Capa book he claims that 7.cxd5 Nxd5 8.Qb3 Bb4 9.Rc1 e5, gives White no more than equality. However, if White follows with 10.dxe5 how does Black get the pawn back?
Jun-14-19  jinkinson: <whiteshark> Turns out there are sources (or at least one source) for his teeth being extracted: https://books.google.com/books?id=E...
Jun-14-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <Helios727>
I checked the opening explorer, and nobody ever plays 10. dxe5 there. Black can probably take a lead in development with 10...Nc5, and I doubt White can safely hang onto the extra pawn for long.
Apr-28-20  joddon: 22qd2, and the rest of Capas Queen moves were so well executed, especially in stressful conditions of playing the great Alexander!!
Feb-10-21  Muttley101: Just to correct an earlier (but not recent) comment:

<But after the war it seemed that eventually Botvinnik was ready to play him [Alekhine] (it had been arranged) despite the controversy. But he fell drunk and raving from a hotel window to his death and so they played the 1948 World Championships.>

Alekhine was found dead sat in a chair in his hotel room in Estoril. A well-known photo of it exists. Possible heart failure, possible choking. As always, Edward Winter has covered it extensively:

https://www.chesshistory.com/winter...

Feb-10-21  RookFile: Capa shows what a great player he was in this game. This was an open fight, chances for both sides, and he out calculates Alekhine.
Feb-10-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: 21...Qh3 is positionally awful. The Queen never impacts the game afterwards. Qg5/f6 has to be better. A nice diagonal with some perpetual ideas, keeps an eye on the d4 Rook and f2 Pawn.
Mar-17-21  I like ya cut g: Finally someone from 2021!
Apr-30-21  SymphonicKnight: Kasparov in MGP v.1 does not find the first two major mistakes by Alekhine that caused the loss of this game: 18...Re8? (...g6!)
24.Qxh2? (...g6!)

Kasparov does not attach question marks to either move, but does identify the relatively minor: 12...Ne4?! but does not recommend the best move, (...b6!)when the position is still equal.

May-03-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <SymphonicKnight> I've looked at this game a bit and I'm highly skeptical Black could still equalize with 24...g6. What if White continues similar to the actual game with 24...g6 25. Qb2, then what's the follow-up plan?

As for move 18, Alekhine is a pawn down and I doubt he'd consider a less active move such as 18...g6, and it looks to me like a solid plus for White.

Aug-23-21  yurikvelo: multiPV
https://pastebin.com/wCgxvBU8

24. .. g6! is draw (SF-dev + Syzygy 6; D=60 at root + self-play D>50 per move)

any other move is quick loss

Feb-24-22  N.O.F. NAJDORF: <Richard Taylor:
Alekhine, after some days of debauching and boozing, lost his mind, and threw him self from a seedy hotel in Lisbon. As his body landed on the road a passing Portuguese who knew he was a bastard spat on the body to express contempt...>

I don't know where you get that nonsense from. Alekhine died by choking on a piece of meat.

Although he had written in a letter that he suspected he was being followed, no document has ever emerged from the KGB / NKVD archives to support suspicions that he was murdered by the communists.

Furthermore, a witness to the post-mortem recorded that he actually saw the blockage that caused Alekhine's death.

Feb-24-22  N.O.F. NAJDORF: <Richard Taylor: Then he played games in Nazi Germany during the war and, it was alleged, wrote anti-Semitic propaganda to save his skin.>

That is also incorrect.

Alekhine claimed that he was forced by the Nazis to write the articles, but also that they changed their content to make him seem anti-Semitic.

This is unbelievable.

Why would the Nazis force him to write articles that WERE NOT anti-Semitic?

Many people have been prepared to give Alekhine the benefit of the doubt, citing the supposed lack of proof, but - unfortunately for Alekhine - he gave an interview to a Spanish newspaper in which he expressed his pride in being the first person to write an article about chess 'from the racial point of view'.

No-one should be surprised by this coup de grace to Alekhine's reputation: he was a personal friend of Hans Frank, who died in Nuremberg almost seven months after Alekhine - by hanging.

Feb-24-22  N.O.F. NAJDORF: In his articles and interviews from the Nazi period, Alekhine praised Capablanca but rubbished Reti and Nimzowitsch, and criticised Jewish chess masters for their alleged lack of creativity and, allegedly, waiting for their opponents to make mistakes.

The curious thing is that, before the Nazi conquest of Europe, Alekhine had written an article in which he praised Reti, Breyer, and Nimzowitsch, all of whom were Jewish, for their creativity, and criticised Capablanca for waiting for his opponents to make mistakes.

During one interview, Alekhine referred to Emanuel Lasker as 'the Jew Lasker'.

Max Euwe related that immediately following his only win against Lasker, Alekhine referred to him as 'the Jew'.

Fischer himself referred to Kasparov as 'the Jew Weinstein'.

Alekhine's antisemitism was well-known and Euwe was one of the grandmasters who objected to his participation in the London tournament of 1946.

The invitation to Alekhine was cancelled.

Feb-25-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: The entire article was bollocks.
Mar-25-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <N.O.F. NAJDORF: <Richard Taylor: Alekhine, after some days of debauching and boozing, lost his mind, and threw him self from a seedy hotel in Lisbon. As his body landed on the road a passing Portuguese who knew he was a bastard spat on the body to express contempt...> I don't know where you get that nonsense from. Alekhine died by choking on a piece of meat....>

I choked on some things last year and was saved by my son and a young Tongan man. It is quite scary.

The thing I wrote re Alekhine arose when I asserted a long time ago that he was Jewish and when someone pointed out he wasn't I realized my memory of reading about Alekhine etc via Edward Lasker's book of Chess and chess players led me to think he was Jewish like Rubinstein, and so on.

But then I made up a story of him being in Nazi German, a rival he had and so on....the fact though is that if I write he threw himself out of a window that that is the truth of the matter.

It is far more worthy of an anecdote a la, say Perec or Borges, say, or indeed Nabokov of 'The Defense'.....to be left out of history.

Awful as choking to death is I urge that that almost comically (if frightening) method of demise is too undignified. There something a bit more heroic, possibly, in a man throwing himself out of a window in a passion of depression or inebriation so we need to amend history accordingly....

Mar-25-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <N.O.F. NAJDORF: In his articles and interviews from the Nazi period, Alekhine praised Capablanca but rubbished Reti and Nimzowitsch, and criticised Jewish chess masters for their alleged lack of creativity and, allegedly, waiting for their opponents to make mistakes. The curious thing is that, before the Nazi conquest of Europe, Alekhine had written an article in which he praised Reti, Breyer, and Nimzowitsch, all of whom were Jewish, for their creativity, and criticised Capablanca for waiting for his opponents to make mistakes.

During one interview, Alekhine referred to Emanuel Lasker as 'the Jew Lasker'.

Max Euwe related that immediately following his only win against Lasker, Alekhine referred to him as 'the Jew'.>

Was Euwe Jewish?

<Fischer himself referred to Kasparov as 'the Jew Weinstein'.>

I know this, Fischer of course was Jewish himself. He was close to insane most of his life. I have Kasparov's book of his own life.

<Alekhine's antisemitism was well-known and Euwe was one of the grandmasters who objected to his participation in the London tournament of 1946.

The invitation to Alekhine was cancelled.>

But such anti-Semitism was very common in those days. Alekhine was White Russian and they were pretty right wing. Alekhine was a great player.

As it happens I enjoyed playing over his games played in Germany the most of all his games. His match with Capa was much less of a pushover than people might think with some interesting struggles going on. People forget that Capa won quite a lot. He never got a return match.

Mar-25-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: But indeed I invented a whole lot about Alekhine, once I had started I almost wrote a kind of imaginative biography of Alekhine!

But then I lost interest.

N.O.F. NAJDORF might be interested, but I once had a long 'discussion' on here with an Israeli. This was some years ago.

Later, I had forgotten, but it is almost certain, looking through family histories etc that on my father's side (he was from London) it appears I am -- according to my Uncle (my father's brother) and my sister -- almost certainly of Jewish descent on that side. But I cant find anything further about my father's father etc as he had a feud with his father. But my grandfather's name was Samuel Aaron and that was changed later by I think my grandfather or perhaps him, to Taylor. By the names he and his wife might have emigrated from central or Eastern Europe, although another theory is Spain or Portugal....not sure....

Not that I have myself any religion per se. And I have no 'influence'.

For me, everyone who is human is human and that is that. So I have no prejudices per se....

Apr-17-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <perfidious: The entire article was bollocks.> Yes! I was thinking of it being a kind of fiction. I either then or later read Zwieg's book about a supposed World Chess Champion who escaped the, but my memory of reading Nabokov's 'The Defense' some years ago parly inspired the way of Alekhine's demise. The real end of Alekhine is to dreary. Let's make things up more. After all so-called "truth" has long since bowed out of this dark universe...Much more fun to make Alekhine to have a bit more depth. Maybe he was somewhat 'racial' as our honourable friend of such depth and insight tells us. But the reality....well reality is too boring. I was looking at 'The Soviet School of Chess' which I loved as a young player learning chess in the 60s ... there the Soviets have Alekhine as one of their great players, not a mention of his (even rumoured) misdemeanours, and Nezmedtidnov is of peasant origin (possibly true) whose family were saved by the glorious Revolution from suffering and lived with great joy...but I think I was so focused on the players, and the layout of that book etc...to take much notice. Alekhine fascinated me with his seemingly "evil" and piercing eyes (the eyes of those blue eyed Master Beings "whose golden arrow fleet to the blue distant and glorious shores of human awakening"? Ah, the days of reading 'Thus Sprach Zara..."! ) And I noticed today talk by Kotov and Yudovich of 'The Great Patriotic War'. As I say, I was focused on the GMs and the IMs etc. After all Tal had just been World Champion...Tchigorin was or is still set by them as the great imaginative and creative innovator....

It did occur to me somewhat in those days that it was strange that the Soviets embraced such a totally individualistic and egotistical game as chess as somehow liberating the working people and so on.

But that book had quite some influence to chess players. Not that it converted them to the Soviet system but it was a kind of quirky masterpiece.

The more recent 'Chinese School of Chess' is very different.

Aug-14-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: Several sources refer to 9 Bh4 as being a theoretical novelty but, although rarely played (9 Be2 is the main line), it was not new. 10 dxc had been played in the draw Havasi-Asztalos Gyor 1924; 10 Nb3 was new. Alekhine spent more than an hour on his 9th and 12th moves without solving his opening problems. 14..exd 15 Bd3..Be6 16 0-0..Rfc8 17 c4! would have favored White. Alekhine may have underestimated 15 Rd1! allowing White to keep his pawn while also giving him a promising initiative. 24 Bxb7?!..Rab8 25 Bc6..Rxb3 26 Qd1..Rb6 27 Bxe8..Qg2 would have led to messy complications. 28..Rd6? shortened the game; perhaps 28..Kg8.

I thought this was a really nice game. This could be considered an example of Alekhine's use of psychological play trying to lure Capablanca into tactical complications but, in this game, it didn't work.

Aug-14-22  offramp: This is game 7, and it ended with an attack on the black King with ♕♖♖ v ♕♖♖.

Game 27 ended with an attack in the black king with the same material:


click for larger view

But in game 27 Capa made a slip and the game ended drawn.

Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 6)
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>

NOTE: Create an account today to post replies and access other powerful features which are available only to registered users. Becoming a member is free, anonymous, and takes less than 1 minute! If you already have a username, then simply login login under your username now to join the discussion.

Please observe our posting guidelines:

  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate, or gibberish posts.
  3. No vitriolic or systematic personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No cyberstalking or malicious posting of negative or private information (doxing/doxxing) of members.
  6. No trolling.
  7. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by moderators, create a false impression of consensus or support, or stage conversations, is prohibited.
  8. Do not degrade Chessgames or any of it's staff/volunteers.

Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.

Blow the Whistle

See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a moderator.


NOTE: Please keep all discussion on-topic. This forum is for this specific game only. To discuss chess or this site in general, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
All moderator actions taken are ultimately at the sole discretion of the administration.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
Game 104
from Garry Kasparov's On My Great Predecessors (1A) by AdrianP
Game 104
from Garry Kasparov's On My Great Predecessors (1A) by nakul1964
2 Capablanca on Defense
from Capablanca. Move by move by agb2002
65. "Capablanca snatches the attack"
from Immortal Games of Capablanca, F. Reinfeld by mjk
Only 2 pages of kibitizing?
from They were surprised by Calli
Buenos Aires, World Championship
from Alexander Alekhine Games, 1925-1929 by MonsieurL
Alekhine's Worst Games 1927-1939
by isolatedpawn
ENDGAME: Rook Ending 1
from Teaching Moments in Chess by kdogphs
Beautiful games!!!
by Tamerlan
Capablanca's killer games
by Rookinstein
07. Alekhine gambles... and Capa takes the lead!
from 1927 Alekhine-Capablanca WC match by aragorn69
Capablanca's g7-queen, h7-rook dominate the 7th rank
from 7th heaven! 7th rank above all! by notyetagm
1927
from Infamous Match-ups: Alekhine by blingice
Capa makes it look easy
from Favorite games by shintaro go
Game 104
from Garry Kasparov on My Great Predecessors Part 1 by MetalPlastic
morfishine: I think he was still drunk.
from Alekhine was drunk! by Calli
!!!
from capablanca best games by brager
Complex favorites
by Whitehat1963
Capablanca - Alekhine, 1927 Game 7
from FGetulio's How World Champions Win II by fgetulio
Capa vs. Aleka
by Willian612
plus 122 more collections (not shown)

Home | About | Login | Logout | F.A.Q. | Profile | Preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | New Kibitzing | Chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | Privacy Notice | Contact Us

Copyright 2001-2021, Chessgames Services LLC