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Robert Eugene Byrne vs Ulf Andersson
Amsterdam IBM (1979), Amsterdam NED, rd 12, Jul-26
Sicilian Defense: Kan. Swiss Cheese Variation (B42)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Mateo: A masterpiece. Andersson gives us a classical example of the hidden possibilities for the Black side in a Marockzy bind pawn structure (e4-c4 againdt e6-d6). The unexpected opening of the game leads to a violent tactical firework. In the ending the pin must be savoured as a hallmark of refined sadism.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 a6 5.Bd3 g6 6.b3 d6 <6...Bg7> 7.O-O Bg7 8.Bb2 Nf6 9.c4 O-O 10.Nc3 Nbd7 11.Re1 Re8 12.Bf1 b6 13.Qd2 Bb7 14.Rad1 Qc7 15.f3 Rad8 16.Qf2 Ne5 17.Rc1 d5! <the freeing break> 18.exd5 Nfg4!! 19.Qg3? <19.fg? Ng4 20.Qh4 Bd4 21.Kh1 Qf4 22.Ne2 (22.g3 Qf2 23.Be2 ed wins) Qf2! 23.Qg4 Bb2 24.Rcd1 ed wins for Black. But Byrne missed a subtle point hard to find on the board. He should have played 19.Qh4 Bf6 and only now 20.Qg3. The point is that after 20... Nf3 21.Nf3! is possible now because 21...Qc5 22.Kh1 Nf2 23.Qf2! Qf2 24.Re2 Qc5 25.Ne4 (here it is: this would not be possible if the Bishop was on g7) Bb2! 26.Nc5 Bc1 27.Nb7 Rd7 28.c5 Rb7 29.Re1 is unclear. So Black should rather play 20...Nd3! 21.Qg4 Nb2 with a very good game for Black.> Nxf3+!! 20.gxf3 <20.Nf3 Qc5 21.Kh1 Nf2 22.Kg1 Ne4 wins> Bxd4+ 21.Kh1 Qxg3 22.hxg3 Ne3 <now Black wins a pawn, as the d5 pawn is pinned.> 23.Bd3? <Better 23.Ba1 but 23...Nf1 24.Rf1 ed 25.Nd5 Ba1 26.Ra1 Bd5 27.cd Rd5 wins a pawn.> exd5 24.cxd5 Nxd5 25.Rxe8+ Rxe8 26.Be4 Bxc3 27.Bxc3 Nxc3 28.Bxb7 Nxa2 29.Rc6 a5 30.Rxb6 Rb8! <a decisive pin. In fact this sound move wins the exchange.> 31.Kg2 Kf8 32.Rb5 Nb4! <the Bishop cannot move.> 33.Kf2 Ke7 34.Ke3 Kd6 35.Kd4 Kc7 36.Rxb4 axb4 37.Bd5 Kd6! 38.Bxf7 Rf8 39.Bd5 Rf5 40.Be4 Rg5 41.g4 h5 0-1

Jun-24-06  RookFile: Well, Andersson was always one of the best endgame players, and his powers in this field are on full display here.
Aug-13-10  Ulhumbrus: After 18...Nfg4 !! 19 fxg4 Nxg4 White's Queen is short of squares on the g1-a7 diagonal and has to abandon her defence of the N on d4 which is attacked by Black's King's Bishop.

<Mateo: But Byrne missed a subtle point hard to find on the board. He should have played 19.Qh4 Bf6 and only now 20.Qg3. The point is that after 20... Nf3 21.Nf3! is possible now because 21...Qc5 22.Kh1 Nf2 23.Qf2! Qf2 24.Re2 Qc5 25.Ne4 (here it is: this would not be possible if the Bishop was on g7) Bb2! 26.Nc5 Bc1 27.Nb7 Rd7 28.c5 Rb7 29.Re1 is unclear. So Black should rather play 20...Nd3! 21.Qg4 Nb2 with a very good game for Black.> A brilliant piece of analysis. It invites looking at further. Apart from 20...Nd3 in reply to 20 Qh4, suppose that Black tries 20...g5 . On 21 Qxg5 Nxf3+ 22 gxf3 Qxh2 is mate, On 21 Qxg5 Nxf3+ 22 Nxf3 Qc5+ 23 Kh1 Nf2+ 24 Kg1 Nh3+ 27 Kh1 Qg1+! 28 Nxg1 Nf2 is mate. If White can't afford to displace his Queen from the e1-h4 diagonal, this suggests that White has to bring the Queen back to g3.

Jan-05-18  tinnderbox: Ah, memories. I was there when this fantastic game was played. When somebody reported Ulf had played 18. ... Nfg4 everybody thought he was joking...

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