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Anatoly Karpov vs Zurab Alekseyevich Azmaiparashvili
50th USSR Championship (1983), Moscow URS, rd 5, Apr-08
Pirc Defense: Classical Variation. Quiet System Parma Defense (B08)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jul-27-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Joshka: Just looking at this for a minute or so, why can't the rook be taken on c3?.sorry just a patzer here.
Jul-27-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <Joshka>
<why can't the rook be taken> Good question. I think it would go 15. Qxc3 Nxe4 16. Qe3 Nxg5 17. Qxg5 Bf5, and Black has one pawn plus good piece activity for the exchange.
Jan-02-12  crafty: 15. ♕xc3 ♘xe4 16. ♕e3 ♘xg5 17. ♕xg5 ♗f5 18. c4 bxc4   (eval 1.03; depth 19 ply; 1000M nodes)
Sep-02-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  numbersguy70: Would be curious to know time controls. Looks like 40. Ke5 rather than 40. Rd7 blows the draw.
Sep-02-12  thegoldenband: This game was pretty famous among Pirc fans at one time. Was this the first game to introduce the pawn sacrifice with 10...b5? That move was eventually shown to be unsound, but it was a great surprise here. Karpov seems to have lost some significant games when faced with an unexpected pawn sac TN, like Kasparov's 8...d5 in the Taimanov Sicilian.
Oct-07-12  Alesavio: Why not 11.Bxb5?
Oct-07-12  Everett: <thegoldenband: This game was pretty famous among Pirc fans at one time. Was this the first game to introduce the pawn sacrifice with 10...b5? That move was eventually shown to be unsound, but it was a great surprise here. Karpov seems to have lost some significant games when faced with an unexpected pawn sac TN, like Kasparov's 8...d5 in the Taimanov Sicilian.>

Everyone has lost some significant games, but no one loses, or wins, an entire game from a pawn sac.

Apr-03-17  Swedish Logician: <Alesavio>, a beginning of an answer to the question Why not 11. - Bxb5? can be found in this simul-game from 1984 Karpov vs N Carr, 1984 .
Oct-07-17  thegoldenband: <Everett: Everyone has lost some significant games, but no one loses, or wins, an entire game from a pawn sac.>

What a strange comment, "correcting" something I never said -- and how funny that I happen to discover it five years to the day afterward.

So, to paraphrase Fischer, "Right, Mr. Everett!": yes, no one wins or loses an entire game from a pawn sac (unless you count 1. g4 e5 2. f4?? I suppose). Five points for Slytherin.

But -- this was my point then, and now too -- some of Karpov's most striking, well-known, and/or unexpected losses have come in games where he was on the receiving end of an opening novelty (or near-novelty) that involved a pawn sac. (In the cases I mentioned, the sac was also ultimately shown to be unsound.)

As I reread my original post it remains clear as day to my eyes, so...what gives? What made you feel the need to "correct" it? (Were your cornflakes somehow adulterated that day?)

Oct-08-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <thegoldenband....Was this the first game to introduce the pawn sacrifice with 10...b5?>

Believe it was; certainly it was the first at top level.

<....That move was eventually shown to be unsound, but it was a great surprise here....>

I was present for Rizzitano-Wolff, 6th Monadnock Marathon, played in October 1983, which introduced an improvement for White and was published in Informator. A later innovation established the soundness of the ....b5 idea, however.

Oct-08-17  thegoldenband: Thanks, <perfidious>. I seem to remember some early-1990s analysis by John Nunn that established 10...b5 as unsound, though of course the basic idea clearly has merit. If more recent analysis has revived it, that's fun to hear.

My other point was that maybe something in Karpov's style -- a certain predictable cautiousness in his response? -- made this kind of TN a good tactic against him, especially when he was playing 1. e4.

Also, Monadnock Marathon! Wow, I haven't heard that phrase in a long time.

Oct-08-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <thegoldenband>, I believe you are correct that Nunn noted that 10....b5 was not best, but played at move 11, the idea was sound. Been a long time since I played this; mid 1980s, likely.

I agree that Karpov seemed to react less certainly when faced with surprises than when he felt completely in control of things.

Played in all the Monadnock Marathons from 1979 to 1993. The more fool I!

Oct-09-17  Howard: For the uninitiated of you, the comment "Right, Mr. Everett" is obviously derived from a game in Fischer's M60MG. We'll let readers of this post find out for themselves which game that is.
Oct-09-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Howard: For the uninitiated of you, the comment "Right, Mr. Everett" is obviously derived from a game in Fischer's M60MG. We'll let readers of this post find out for themselves which game that is.>

You've got some nerve, Howard, given that you seem to regard cg.com as your personal research library.

Fischer vs Keres, 1962

<thegoldenband> Kasparov's ...d5 gambit wasn't a surprise, since it was the second time he'd played it in the match.

Oct-10-17  Howard: No offense was intended by the above comment, but exactly what do you mean?
Nov-04-17  thegoldenband: <keypusher: Kasparov's ...d5 gambit wasn't a surprise, since it was the second time he'd played it in the match.>

This is something like a Zen koan -- or a Yogi Berra one-liner, e.g. "Nobody goes to that restaurant anymore, it's too crowded."

Nov-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: < thegoldenband: <keypusher: Kasparov's ...d5 gambit wasn't a surprise, since it was the second time he'd played it in the match.> This is something like a Zen koan -- or a Yogi Berra one-liner, e.g. "Nobody goes to that restaurant anymore, it's too crowded.">

No, more like <it's not a novelty because it isn't new.> Just correcting your mistake. The first time Kasparov played it was a short draw. The second time was the octopus game. Karpov wasn't surprised by it the second time, and had obviously prepared for it.

Nov-04-17  thegoldenband: Ah, touché -- though I think there's a case to be made (especially in the pre-computer age) for viewing 8...d5 as a novelty in the aggregate, i.e. a move never seen before this match (even if it was played twice) that required a response during an ongoing event.

Still, you're entirely correct: the win came in the second 8...d5 game, almost two weeks later, after Karpov shut things down in the first game.

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