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Wolfgang Uhlmann vs David Bronstein
Asztalos Memorial (1966), Szombathely HUN, rd 2, Jul-??
Old Indian Defense: Czech Variation (A53)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-08-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: 39.Rf5 with the dual threats of 40.Rg5 and 40.Nf6+ wins, but the fastest is 39.Rxb6 axb6 40.Nf6+ leaving White a piece up, since Black can't even play 40...Kf8 in light of 41.Qd6+ Re7 42.Qd8+ Re8 43.Qxe8#.
Sep-08-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: The dual, as pointed out by <FSR> and often seen in POTD, detracts from the simple, if pleasurable solution.
Sep-08-20  saturn2: I went for 39. Rf5 too with a possible follow up

39....Kh8 40. Nf6 Rd8 (or other rook moves on the last rank) 41. Rh5 attacking h7

Sep-08-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: I got 39.Rxb6 axb6 40.Nf6+ Kh8 41 Nxe8 Qg6 42 Nd6.


click for larger view

If 39.Rxb6 axb6 40.Nf6+ Kf8 you have to see 41 Qd6+. I don't think 41 Nxe8, below, is good enough.


click for larger view

Sep-08-20  perfessor: The problem with 39. Rf5 is Bd8, defending against both threats. The move played (Rxb6) is the only way.
Sep-08-20  Walter Glattke: 39.Rxb6 axb6 40.Nf6+ Kf8? 41.Qd6+ Re7 42.Qd8+ Re8 43.Qxe8# 40.-Kh8 41.Nxe8 Qg6 42.Qb8 h7 43.Nf6+ Kg7 44.Qe5 --- 2nd way: 39.Rf5 Bd8 40.Nf6+ Bxf6 41.Rxf6 a5 42.Rf5 h6 43.Rh5 Kh7 44.Qe5+ Kg8 45.Qxc5 won ending
Sep-08-20  Brenin: White's R is occupying a square which the N needs, and Black's B on b6 could move to d8 to defend it, so the solution is clear: 39 Rxb6 axb6 (what else?) 40 Nb6+ Kf8 (Kh8 41 Nxe8 loses a piece) 41 Qd6+ Re7 42 Qd8+ Re8 43 Qxe8#.
Sep-08-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has a knight and a pawn for a bishop.

The rook blocks the knight. Therefore, 39.Rxb6 axb6 40.Nf6+:

A) 40... Kf8 41.Qd6+ Re7 42.Qd8+ Re8 43.Qxe8#.

B) 40... Kh8 41.Nxe8 + - [N+P].

Sep-08-20  Tomate: @FSR 39.Rf5 Bd8 is not so clear. Black looks ugly, but still white has to find some moves (intuitively, I would say that Black pawns c5 or a7 will fall)
Sep-08-20  stacase: Easy? I suppose, but it took me way too long trying to find some mating attack, when a simple Knight fork was sitting there waiting to be discovered.
Sep-08-20  malt: Have 39.R:b6 ab6 40.Nf6+ Kh8

(40...Kf8 41.Qd6+ Re7 42.Qd8+ Re8 43.Q:e8# )

41.N:e8 Qg6 42.Nd6

Sep-08-20  Brenin: What was the purpose of 38 Kh2? Why not 38 Rxb6 immediately, e.g. 30 ... axb6 39 Qd6+ or 30 ... Qa1+ 31 Kh2 axb6 32 Qh6+ Qg7 33 Qd6+ Kg8 34 Nf6+, all with mate or significant material gain. After 38 Kh2, Bd8 would have kept Black's chances just about alive. Time trouble, no doubt.
Sep-08-20  zb2cr: kay, we need to do something useful to vacate the forking square f6. 39. Rxb6, axb6; 40. Nf6+. Now Black has 2 choices:

A. 40. ... Kf8; 41. Qd6+, Re7; 42. Qd8+, Re8; 43 .Qxe8#.

B. 40. ... Kh8; 41. Nxe8, Qg6; 42. Nd6. White is now up by N+P. Also, if Black attempts to save his f-Pawn, e.g., 42. ... Kg7; 43. Nf5+, Kh8; 44. Qb8+!

Sep-08-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: <perfessor: The problem with 39. Rf5 is Bd8, defending against both threats. The move played (Rxb6) is the only way.>

Well, 39.Rf5 Bd8 40.Qd6 with fall of Pc5 is quite hopeless for black but of course, 39.Rxb6 is much more convincing.

Sep-08-20  TheaN: In a rare occurence, I saw the closing line after having played the initial moves.

<39.Rxb6!> once you see the lateral capture it's obvious. I spend some time on Rxf7 but err... no. <39....axb6> alternatives, yes, decent, no. <40.Nf6+ Kh8> the key being 40....Kf8 41.Qd6+ (this I spotted last) Re7 42.Qd8+ Re8 43.Qxe8# <41.Nxe8 with 42.Qf6+ +-> and Black can't recover material.

<<Jim> If 39.Rxb6 axb6 40.Nf6+ Kf8 you have to see 41 Qd6+. I don't think 41 Nxe8, below, is good enough.> probably not, even though it was my original idea. What I thought was that White has the final shot to simplify completely, but of course after 41....Kxe8 42.Qg3? the Black queen is no longer pinned, so after 42....Qb2 = Black has already equalized.

Best is the methodological maneuver 42.Qe4+ Kf8 43.Qa8+ Ke7 44.Qb7+ Kf8, sixth rank in any case allows Qxb6+, 45.Qc8+ Ke7 46.Qc7+ Ke8, with the Black king forcefully on e8, 47.Qxb6 Qe5+ 48.g3 Qxe3 49.Qb2 ⩲


click for larger view

Probably drawn, but Black will have to thread carefully, because simplification now means game over.

Sep-08-20  TheaN: <Brenin: What was the purpose of 38 Kh2? Why not 38 Rxb6 immediately, e.g. 30 ... axb6 39 Qd6+ or 30 ... Qa1+ 31 Kh2 axb6 32 Qh6+ Qg7 33 Qd6+ Kg8 34 Nf6+, all with mate or significant material gain. After 38 Kh2, Bd8 would have kept Black's chances just about alive. Time trouble, no doubt.> The latter in combination with not being able to solve the second line. I mean, if you fire a combination based on limited space, and the opponent can fire a spite queen check, you can easily drown in (semi-)endless possibilities for the opponent. Someone of Uhlmann's caliber would be able to solve the position after 41....axb6 but 42.Qh6+ is not entirely natural.
Sep-08-20  saturn2: <Honza Cervenka
Well, 39.Rf5 Bd8 40.Qd6 with fall of Pc5 >
Black can defend this pawn by 40..Qf8 but 41 Qd7 threatens the a pawn.
Sep-08-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Doubt rb6 tamer afraid?
Sep-08-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Jah rule in the f6 knight no blow it?
Sep-08-20  mel gibson: I didn't get this one.

Stockfish 12 agrees with the text:

(39. Rxb6

(♖f6xb6 a7xb6 ♘d5-f6+ ♕g7xf6 ♕f4xf6 ♖e8-e4
♕f6-d8+ ♔g8-g7 ♕d8-d5 ♖e4-e6 ♕d5xe6 f7xe6 ♔h2-g3 ♔g7-f7 ♔g3-f4 ♔f7-e7 a3-a4 ♔e7-d6 e3-e4 ♔d6-c7 ♔f4-e5 h7-h5 ♔e5xe6 h5-h4 ♔e6-d5 ♔c7-b8 e4-e5 ♔b8-b7 ♔d5-d6 ♔b7-a6 e5-e6 ♔a6-a5 e6-e7 ♔a5-b4 ♔d6-c6 ♔b4xc4 ♔c6xb6 ♔c4-b4 a4-a5 c5-c4 a5-a6 c4-c3 a6-a7 ♔b4-b3 a7-a8♕ c3-c2 ♕a8-d5+ ♔b3-b2 ♕d5-d4+ ♔b2-a2 ♕d4-c4+ ♔a2-b2 e7-e8♕) +12.24/37 189)

score for White +12.24 depth 37

Sep-08-20  Walter Glattke: Why 38.Kh2!? asks Brenin, well, they are only grandmasters, perhaps we kibitzers are the better ones, hah, hah! Outside of this joke I tested 39.Qd6+ Kg8 40.Ne7+ Kh8 41.Nf5 Qg5 42.Qd7 (Qxf6 Qxf8#) Rf8 43.Rxf7, and in addition to 38.Kh2 Kg8 39.Rxb6 or 39.Rxf5 the third idea was 39.Nxb6 axb6 40.Rxb6 with a won ending, too.
Sep-08-20  Walter Glattke: I mean 38.Qd6+, one number back with the moves, please.
Sep-08-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  fm avari viraf: The sweet memories with my friend GM Bronstein still linger in my mind as we both shared some happy moments during our International Chess Tournaments at Hastings, England-U.K.
Sep-08-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: <saturn2: <Honza Cervenka Well, 39.Rf5 Bd8 40.Qd6 with fall of Pc5 > Black can defend this pawn by 40..Qf8 but 41 Qd7 threatens the a pawn.>

Yes, 40...Qf8 saves Pc5 but 41.Qa6 (this can be even better than 41.Qd7 a5, though white's advantage is huge anyway) wins the second Pawn. The result of the game would be hardly in doubt after that. But the game solution is clearly superior choice.

Sep-09-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <perfessor>, <tomate>, and <Honza Cervenka> are right that my proposed alternate solution is much inferior to 39.Rxb6!
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