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Reuben Fine vs Arthur William Dake
"The Fine Print" (game of the day Apr-24-2013)
Olympic Selection Tournament (1933), New York, NY USA, rd 4, May-09
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Classical Variation (E32)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jan-05-02  bishop: Black did not get any compensation for ceding the two bishops.26 e5! opened up the position quite nicely for them.
Jan-06-02
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: I think White could have gone for the jugular with 21 Nf5, threatening Bxf6 and Qc3. I think black would find that it's very hard to save his g-pawn, e.g. 21. Nf5 Re6? 22. Nxg7 Qxg7 23. f5
Jul-18-04  iron maiden: According to the DB, this was Fine's only victory against Arthur Dake. He lost six times in nine games.
Jul-28-04  patzer2: Fine shreds Black's pawn structure with 32. Rxf6! He could have gone for a slow endgame win with 34. Bxd8, but instead finds the deadly quiet move 34. Nf5!!
Jul-28-04  patzer2: In the final position, White has a simple mate-in-three after 36...Kg7 37. Qg5+ Ng6 38. Qxg6+ King moves 38. Qg8#
May-04-11  Ulhumbrus: Fine plays the Rook advance 28 Re3 following the breakthrough 26 e5 ( 26...dxe5 27 fxe5 h6) instead of playing the Rook advance Re3 before the pawn advance e4-e5 by 26 Re3.

One conceivable reason for this is that if White delays e5 by playing 26 Re3 first, this gives Black a tempo to play 26..Qd7 which removes the Black Queen from the f- file and so avoids a potential pin on the f file after 27 e5 dxe5 28 fxe5.

Apr-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Reuben was a Fine player.
Apr-24-13  RookFile: One of the things Fine realized was that black's c8 bishop was a useless piece. Notice how he developed in such a way to prevent it from coming out to a useful square and how he avoided Nf5 in a position where black could get rid of the thing with ...Bxf5. Practically speaking, black was down a piece while trying to fend off the kingside attack.
Apr-24-13  sorch: "patzer2: In the final position, White has a simple mate-in-three after 36...Kg7 37. Qg5+ Ng6 38. Qxg6+ King moves 38. Qg8#" The fact is that 38.Qg8# doesnt work. But 38. Nf7+ Qxf7 39. Qxf7 implies future mate, in h7 or e8.
Apr-24-13  morfishine: Reuben sandwiches the Black King, who cries out to his ineffective defenders "What a fine mess you've gotten me into"
Apr-24-13  Abdel Irada: <morfishine: Reuben sandwiches the Black King, who cries out to his ineffective defenders "What a fine mess you've gotten me into">

The black king's name is Oliver Hardy?

Apr-24-13  morfishine: <Abdel Irada> Exactly what I was thinking too...I love those guys as well as Abbott & Costello; Who's on First?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sShM...

Apr-24-13  Abdel Irada: <morfishine: <Abdel Irada> Exactly what I was thinking too...I love those guys as well as Abbott & Costello; Who's on First?>

On my old site, Squort.com, I put up a page in my Humor section containing that routine. It remains a matchless classic to this day.

Apr-24-13  morfishine: <Abdel Irada> Did you know there are 23 tapes of that routine preserved over the years? In various venues, clubs, etc.

All different, but all the same :)

Apr-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: fine was an author of end game fame,but he didn't need it here,Dake was thrown into the open.
Apr-24-13  Rama: The whole black army watches as the King goes forth alone to do combat.
Apr-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  piltdown man: I find it incredible that he was never US champion.
Apr-25-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <piltdown man>: Fine may well have been Reshevsky's superior, but could never best him in US championships for one reason or another.

Then along came the 1944 version, sans Sammy, but Fine bought the farm in the following critical game: Denker vs Fine, 1944.

Apr-25-13  RookFile: Fine was a scientific player, i.e. a guy like Gligoric who played the pieces, not the man. I think Reshevsky paid more attention to his opponent's weaknesses, like Lasker.

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Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
Round 4
from Olympic Selection Tournament, 1933 by Phony Benoni
Fines - Lessons From My Games
by scheidt
White's 32. Rxf6! sets up 34. Nf5!!
from Demolition of Pawns: f6 (f3), e6 (e3), a7 (a2) by Del ToRo
Game 8
from Passion for Chess (Fine) by rookchat9
White's 32. Rxf6! sets up 34. Nf5!!
from Demolition of Pawns: f6 (f3), e6 (e3), a7 (a2) by Baby Hawk
Game 8
from Passion for Chess (Fine) by neontheorist
May / June, p. 88 [Game 73 / 5588]
from American Chess Bulletin 1933 by Phony Benoni
White's 32. Rxf6! sets up 34. Nf5!!
from Demolition of Pawns: f6 (f3), e6 (e3), a7 (a2) by nakul1964
White's 32. Rxf6! sets up 34. Nf5!!
from Demolition of Pawns: f6 (f3), e6 (e3), a7 (a2) by trh6upsz
White's 32. Rxf6! sets up 34. Nf5!!
from Demolition of Pawns: f6 (f3), e6 (e3), a7 (a2) by patzer2
Game 8
from Passion for Chess (Fine) by Qindarka
Fines - Lessons From My Games
by rookchat9

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