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Reuben Fine vs Samuel Reshevsky
New York (1951), New York, NY USA, Jan-28
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Huebner. Rubinstein Variation (E42)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jul-27-06  Maynard5: On move 16, the position looks approximately level, although White's pieces are somewhat misplaced: that the bishop on b2 is obstructed by the knight, the queen is exposed on c4, and Black has potential threats of Bb5 if the knight moves away. But none of these factors should give Black anything like a decisive advantage. Instead, starting with 17. Rd3, White plunges into disastrous complications, and ends up losing the equivalent of a rook. Note the way in which White's loose pieces become vulnerable after 20. Nd5, while the queen becomes overworked, unable to protect the rook on d3.
Feb-12-13  jerseybob: I don't like white's 8.Qxd4. It prematurely exposes the queen, giving tempi to the black knights, finally forcing white to give up the valuable white-square bishop, the absence of which becomes very painful for white.
Feb-12-13  RookFile: I think the primary factor was the absence of the light squared bishop. I think that 14. f3 would have been a prudent choice. If you don't have a white squared bishop, maybe you can put your pawns on light squares and get a measure of light squared control that way. 14. f3 also blunts a contemplated attack from black via ....Ng4. By virtue of defending the e4 pawn, the possibility of 15. Qb5 arises - if the queens come off here, both sides can shake hands and call it a draw. A draw is not wonderful, but it's better than losing.
Feb-12-13  jerseybob: Yes, 14.f3 is sounder than Fine's 14.b4, but if 14..Bd7, preventing Qb5 and making way for Rac8, black's lead in development plus a safer queen is still worrisome.
Feb-12-13  RookFile: In that case, white's plan would be, in some order, Be3, Qe2, and Rd1. Looks drawable.
Feb-12-13  jerseybob: For someone in good form(like Reshevsky was), you're probably right. But Fine was out of practise and having a poor tournament - it was his last - and sadly it shows in this game and several others he played in the same tourney.

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