chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing
Robert James Fischer vs William G Addison
US Championship (1966), New York, NY USA, rd 8, Dec-21
Spanish Game: Open Variations (C80)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

explore this opening
find similar games 5 more Fischer/W G Addison games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can make these tips go away by registering a free account then visiting your preferences page. Simply check the option "Don't show random tips on game pages." and click the Update Profile button at the bottom.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
Apr-12-07  refutor: interesting that fischer would ignore the main lines (8.dxe5). was this before or after Fischer vs Larsen, 1966 if it was after i imagine the larsen game probably still left a bad taste in his mouth
Jul-26-07  GoldenKnight: <refutor: interesting that fischer would ignore the main lines (8.dxe5). was this before or after Fischer vs Larsen, 1966 if it was after i imagine the larsen game probably still left a bad taste in his mouth>

I knew Bill Addison when he was in San Francisco. He explained that Fischer told him after the game that he (Fischer) was worried about a prepared variation. This game is historical in the sense that in the U.S. Championship before, Fischer scored a perfect 13-0. Everyone was anxious to see if he could repeat that performance. This first round draw scuttled such expectations. Interesting also that Addison was only an IM. He never did become a GM.

In the next U.S. Championship, Addison came in second to Sammy Reshevsky.

Jul-26-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <GoldenKnight> Fischer scored 11-0 in the 1963-64 championship. The next one he contested was the 1965-66 championship, where he gave up one draw and two losses but won the title by a point. This is the game that broke his win streak.

W G Addison vs Fischer, 1965

The game on this page was (according to Wade and O'Connell) played in Round 8 of the 66/67 championship. Fischer didn't manage a perfect score, but did get eight wins and three draws, including this one.

Jul-27-07  Petrosianic: Right, the sequence is
Fischer scores 11-0 (not 13-0) in 1963-4.

Addison and Fischer draw in Round 1 of the December 1965 championship.

Addison and Fischer draw in this game (Round 8 of the December 1966 championship).

And another correction, it was two championships later, not the next one, that Addison finished second to Reshevsky after leading most of the way. Addison didn't play in the 1968 championship.

Since this was December 1966, it was well after the Fischer-Larsen game that had been played early in the year.

Jul-27-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: Fischer's two defeats in the '65-'66 championship constitute two-thirds of all the losses he suffered in eight U.S. championships.
Jul-27-07  Petrosianic: They're also what helped drive him out of US Championship play entirely. After the close calls there and in 1962/3, he became afraid to play in the US Championship after this year because he thought it was too short and that a fluke loss could cost him first place.

He almost refused to play in this tournament, but did so when assured that it was too late to talk about doubling the tournament to 22 rounds, but that they'd try to address it next year.

Imagine what he'd have thought if he'd known that FIDE would one day be using Best of 2 matches in a "World Championship".

Jun-05-09  Petrosianic: <was this before or after Fischer vs Larsen, 1966 if it was after i imagine the larsen game probably still left a bad taste in his mouth>

It was after. This tournament was in December.

<In the next U.S. Championship, Addison came in second to Sammy Reshevsky.>

No, that was two championships later (in 1969). In the next championship, Evans won, with Byrne second. Addison wasn't in that one.

<Interesting also that Addison was only an IM. He never did become a GM.>

Well, that's because, like Fischer, Addison retired early, and went into banking or some such. The rumor I'd heard was that he married someone who made him give up chess (isn't that always the way?), but I couldn't confirm that. Addison was of GM strength, and if he'd kept playing, he probably would have gotten the title eventually.

Jun-05-09  Petrosianic: <This game is historical in the sense that in the U.S. Championship before, Fischer scored a perfect 13-0. Everyone was anxious to see if he could repeat that performance. This first round draw scuttled such expectations.>

These are not the droids you're looking for... Sorry, I don't know what came over me. I meant this is not the game you're looking for. The game where Addison broke Fischer's 12 game winning streak is this one:

W G Addison vs Fischer, 1965

The current game was played the year after that. This game is historical too, but for a different reason: It's the last half point Fischer ever gave up in US Championship play.

Nov-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  profK: Just enough life in this one to make it entertaining !!
Nov-14-11  AnalyzeThis: That artist in me wants to play, with white, 19. f5, playing for mate. Fischer must have considered 19...Bb2, and now do you try to be a hero and go for 20. Bd4 Bxa1 21. Bxa1? Fischer must have thought not. So, what do you try instead? 19. Rab1 instead of the other rook, perhaps? This amounts to a pawn sacrifice because you don't have Bxd5 hitting a3. Would white be able to pull off a kingside attack, though?

Don't have a computer in front of me, but 19. Rab1 or even 19. Rae1 might be worthy of consideration.

NOTE: Create an account today to post replies and access other powerful features which are available only to registered users. Becoming a member is free, anonymous, and takes less than 1 minute! If you already have a username, then simply login login under your username now to join the discussion.

Please observe our posting guidelines:

  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate, or gibberish posts.
  3. No vitriolic or systematic personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No cyberstalking or malicious posting of negative or private information (doxing/doxxing) of members.
  6. No trolling.
  7. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by moderators, create a false impression of consensus or support, or stage conversations, is prohibited.

Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.

Blow the Whistle

See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a moderator.


NOTE: Please keep all discussion on-topic. This forum is for this specific game only. To discuss chess or this site in general, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
All moderator actions taken are ultimately at the sole discretion of the administration.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
r#08
from Fischerīs last national crown by Adriano Saldanha
Bobby Fischer's U.S. Championship Games
by LionHeart40
98_C80-C83_Ruy Lopez, Open
by webbing1947
p. 114
from Spanish (Ruy Lopez): Open Kevin O'Connell by Patca63
p. 114
from Spanish (Ruy Lopez): Open Kevin O'Connell by davidalbert58
p. 114
from Spanish (Ruy Lopez): Open Kevin O'Connell by webbing1947
tbsundar's favorite games
by tbsundar
From the book by Kevin O'Connell p. 114
from Spanish Open by Kafelnikov64
98_C80-C83_Ruy Lopez, Open
by whiteshark

Home | About | Login | Logout | F.A.Q. | Profile | Preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | New Kibitzing | Chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | Privacy Notice | Contact Us

Copyright 2001-2021, Chessgames Services LLC