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Robert James Fischer vs Samuel Schweber
"Schwept Away" (game of the day Oct-28-2011)
Buenos Aires (1970), Buenos Aires ARG, rd 4, Jul-23
French Defense: Winawer. Classical Variation (C18)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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sac: 23.Rxe4 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 10 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-26-04  Catfriend: <WMD> Please, please don't ask that question.. no matter what was the meaning, the subject ALWAYS brings arguments and anger to the forum... people seem to be very passionate about defending their point of view , so, please, don't mention it..
Sep-26-04  InspiredByMorphy: <Willem Wallekers> Your right. 11.Ba3 is stronger. Black can equalize but their is no longer a slight advantage as white marches the doubled c-pawn. 10. ... b6 11. Ba3 Na5 12. Qd2 O-O 13. dxc5 bxc5 14. c4 Rab8 15. cxd5 exd5 16. Bd3 Bxa4 17. Bxc5 Qxc5 18. Rxa4 Nac6 looks like a drawing game.
Sep-26-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Willem Wallekers: White has other options:
13. Qg5 or 13. Rfe1.
Sep-26-04  Rama: 6. a3 cxd4!, 7. axb4 dxc3, 8. bxc3 Qc7, is in Alekhine's notes to NY24. The double attack on c3 and e5 gives black the initiative. I have played this many times with success. I wish I coulda' seen Bobby's way of handling that. Lasker played Nf3.
Sep-26-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Willem Wallekers: Lasker sacced c3 and won.
No Fischer games found with this line.
Does it refute Nc3? ;-)
Sep-26-04  Knight13: I thought it was 23. Qxc7+ Kxc7 24. Ba5+ Kb8 or Kc8 and then 25. Bxd8. Tricky puzzle.
Sep-26-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <I thought it was 23. Qxc7+ Kxc7 24. Ba5+ Kb8 or Kc8 and then 25. Bxd8.>

Of course, you now see that Black could play 24...b6 instead of Kb8 or Kc8, and Black would win.

Sep-27-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: On 23. Rxe4! Qxg3 24. Rxd4 Qc7 25. Bf4 Rhf8 26. Bxc7+ Kxc7, I'll side with <Lawrence>'s program. 27.Bxg6 gives a two pawn advantage on the kingside and Black's d5 pawn remains weak, his Qside majority of little value.
Sep-27-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <Calli> My line was the same as <Lawrence>'s program, conceding White a clear advantage after 23. Rxe4! Qxg3 24. Rxd4 Qc7 25. Bf4 Rhf8 26. Bxc7+ Kxc7 27. Rxd5 Rxf6 .

However, your line seems to be a definite improvement with 27. Bxh6! (instead of 27. Rxd5). However, after 27. Bxh6! Rxf6 28. Bd3 Rg8 29. g3 Bc6 seems to me that Black still has a lot of play and his stronger Queenside pawns might help to offset some of the White two pawn advantage on the Kingside.

Most likely White does win with "best play" after your 27. Bxh6! , but it seems to me Black still has better practical drawing (swindling) chances (with both Rooks on board) here than in the game continuation.

Sep-27-04  Everett: Willem Willakers 24...Qxd3!? is interesting, followed by Bf5. Perhaps at the time black thought he would remain the exchange up...

Still, white's two bishops dominate after the dust clears, so it wouldn't be such a shocker to get rid of one of them. For some reason I can see Lasker or Korchnoi playing 24...Qxd3, maybe still eventually losing, but knowing that this may be a more practical defense.

Sep-28-04  InspiredByMorphy: <Willem Wallekers> <10. ... b6 11. Ba3 Na5 12. Qd2 O-O > 13. Qg5 Rfe8
14. dxc5 bxc5
15. Rfb1 Bxa4
16. Bxc5 Qxc5
17. Rxa4 Qxc3
wins a pawn. 13.Rfe1 is better.
13. Rfe1 Nb7 14. c4 Bc6 15. cxd5 exd5 16. Bb2 Ng6 17. c4 Rad8 looks equal.
Sep-28-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: <Patzer2> "27. Bxh6!" etc

You must mean Bxg6. My opinion is that Black has no chance of holding this game in that line short of a blunder. White can proceed immediately with f4-f5, g4 etc while Black has no way of advancing his pawns.

Sep-28-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Thanks Calli, I did mean 27. Bxg6! I'm sure Fischer would have won and that with "perfect play" it is decisive for White. However, I think 27. Bxg6! Rxf6 28. Bd3 Rg8 29. g3 Bc6 offers better chances to swindle a draw than does the game continuation.
Sep-28-04  Sadgrinner: Can someone explain Fischer's 42. h3?
Why doesnt' black just capture with 42. ...Bxh3?
Sep-28-04  xqdashi: <Sadgrinner> 42. h3 Bxh3 43. Rh1 B moves 44. Rxh6 gives white connected passed pawns
Dec-18-04  aw1988: 23. Rxe4!! and 24. Rxd4 are among the most witty combinations I have ever seen-- the queen has no where to go, but who here could have considered that during a real game?
Dec-18-04  aw1988: Oh, and 22. Re3!
Dec-19-04  aw1988: Sorry, 21. Qg3!, not Re3.
Dec-19-04  aw1988: BLAST. Never mind. :(
Dec-22-04  aw1988: Ok, yeah, 23. Rxe4!!, but I still get the feeling Fischer's previous moves are the set up for this.
Feb-07-05  fgh: 18. Rg3!!! is a much more brilliant move than 23. Rxe4!! and 24. Rxd4!!.
Feb-07-05  Whitehat1963: Forgive me, but I don't see the point of 18. Rg3! Please help.
Feb-07-05  maoam: Perhaps to tempt the faulty knight maneuver 18...Ne7? 19.c4! dxc4 (19...Nf5? 20.cxd5!) 20.Bxc4 Nf5 (20...Qxc4?? 21.Rc3) 21.Rc3 .
Feb-07-05  fgh: <Whitehat1963>: At first glance, the move 18. Rg3!!! doesn't have any sense. However, it includes a very deep idea, it's object is to provocate the move 18. ... Kb8?, after which the black king and queen and are on the same diagonal, so Fischer could play Rf3, and then execute his combination. Note that if 18. Rf3, then 18. ... f5 19. exf6 e5 and there would be no combination at all.
Feb-07-05  Shadow 812: It seems to me that Fischer's 20th move
exf (en passant)was the move that lit touchpaper for the passage of tactical play that followed, he must surely have worked out the ensuing position that would have occurred once the open lines were available to his pieces.
He would never have allowed 22. e4 to be played if the move was so dangerous for White, in fact the resulting play clearly shows that Fischer had seen much deeper and further into this position than his opponent, what is interesting once the smoke has cleared after move 32 is that Fischer only comes out of it with a pawn to show for his efforts, but this was enough to win the game, a common trait in the games of Fischer!!
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