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Robert James Fischer vs Tigran V Petrosian
"A Team of One" (game of the day Apr-27-2010)
Fischer - Petrosian Candidates Final (1971), Buenos Aires ARG, rd 1, Sep-30
Sicilian Defense: Paulsen. Szen Variation (B44)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 7 OF 8 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-07-17  Petrosianic: By that logic, he wasn't the best player the next day. You're confusing separate facts with cause and effect.

Actually, he won because of a time pressure blunder in a drawn position just near the end.

Mar-07-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  ZonszeinP: Hello,
Is this the game in which Mr Fischer kept thinking in spite of the clocks being stopped and the light on the hall out?
Jul-11-17  Coutinho: Is that necessary to play 6 Bf4 7 Be3 8 Bg5?
Jul-11-17  WorstPlayerEver: It's the "main" variation after 6. Bf4 FYI
Jul-26-17  karik: I would have played 19.-Qxc3
Jul-26-17  Howard: Huh? Please clarify the last comment.
Jul-26-17  4tmac: 19...Kb8 (threatens 20...QxN) & 20. Kh1 meets that threat
Aug-23-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: " Huh? Please clarify the last comment."


click for larger view

The lad is thinking 19...Qxc3 20.Qxc3 Ne2+ but 20.Qxc3 is a check!

He possibly means he would have made that mistake during the game.

Of course if the game had been played in 1835 and White did not announce an attack to the Black King by saying "Check!" then Black could have ignored it and played Ne2+ and Nxc3.

This, 'you must announce a check' rule was in 'Chess for Beginners' by William Lewis 1835.

https://image.ibb.co/bH4HSQ/check.jpg

Aug-23-17  ChessHigherCat: <Sally Simpson: This 'you must announce a check' rule was in 'Chess for Beginners' by William Lewis 1835.

https://image.ibb.co/bH4HSQ/check.jpg>

That was before the computer age. Now, before you play online, you have to check the box that says: "By proceeding to play chess on this website, I hereby acknowledge that I may be placed in check and possibly even checkmated without warning and I hereby waive all rights and remedies in that respect."

Aug-23-17  Petrosianic: <Sally Simpson: This 'you must announce a check' rule was in 'Chess for Beginners' by William Lewis 1835.>

The "Must" is probably a pretty fine point. What was the penalty for not doing it? It was probably more a rule of etiquette than a rule of the game.

Aug-23-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: The penalty as the link suggests is the player in check can ignore it.

If the 2016 World Championship play off had been played in 1835 and here...


click for larger view

....Carlsen has just played 50.Qh6 and if Carlsen never said 'check' then Karjakin could play 50...Qf1 and announce 'checkmate'.

Other 1835 'rules'.

If you make an illegal move then your opponent has the choice of letting you keep it, make another move with the touched piece or force the player to make a King move.

Here


click for larger view

White plays 3.Nb3 Black declares it illegal, puts the Knight back on b1 and forces a King move from White. 3.Ke2 Qe4 mate.

----

If a pawn reached the 8th rank then it can be replaced with 'any' piece of the players choosing.

This wording allows you to take another King or even promote to an opponents piece.

White to play and mate in 3 (1835) - two solutions involving a Bishop promotion.


click for larger view

1. h8 = Bishop and mate in two.

1. h8 = Black Bishop and White mates in two.

Aug-23-17  Petrosianic: <Sally Simpson: The penalty as the link suggests is the player in check can ignore it.>

You can't count on people clicking links. There are too many to click. The relevant information has to go in the post itself.

But okay, assuming this is correct, are there any games extant in any database showing this rule in operation? (Would the databases even be able to handle them?)

Now there was a time when White didn't automatically go first. But those games are easily handled by showing whoever did go first as having White even if in the actual game he played Black.

Aug-23-17  ChessHigherCat: <Sally Simpson: White plays 3.Nb3 Black declares it illegal, puts the Knight back on b1 and forces a King move from White. 3.Ke2 Qe4 mate.>

That's a riot! Now I know what you do in your spare time!

The way it's worded, if there had been a pawn on e2, black could have demanded that the king hop off the board, too, because it doesn't say anything about a LEGAL king move.

Aug-23-17  Petrosianic: <ChessHigherCat>: <That's a riot! Now I know what you do in your spare time!>

He reads chess books. What a shock. I assumed he was into gardening.

Aug-23-17  Petrosianic: <Sally Simpson: The penalty as the link suggests is the player in check can ignore it.>

The thing is that that's no penalty at all UNLESS the other player can mate on the move.

Case in point. 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+. I fail to announce check, so you can "ignore" it. You ignore it and play 3...Nf6. I play 4. Bxe8, capturing your King. What good did ignoring it do?

Aug-23-17  ChessHigherCat: < Petrosianic: <ChessHigherCat>: <That's a riot! Now I know what you do in your spare time!>

<He reads chess books. What a shock. I assumed he was into gardening.>

Okay, but how many people read chess books about games and positions that are no longer possible according to the modern rules?

You always miss the point because you want everything to be nonsense and that prevents you from looking just a little further to get the point.

Aug-23-17  Petrosianic: <Okay, but how many people read chess books about games and positions that are no longer possible according to the modern rules?>

Quite a lot of people. It's a well known story, that's been told by every writer of chess curiosities from Soltis to Chernev. It's not that I misunderstood the point, but that the point was wrong.

Good thing he didn't tell the Three Kings Checkmated Simultaneously Story.

Aug-23-17  ChessHigherCat: <Petrosianic: <Okay, but how many people read chess books about games and positions that are no longer possible according to the modern rules?>

<Quite a lot of people. It's a well known story, that's been told by every writer of chess curiosities from Soltis to Chernev. It's not that I misunderstood the point, but that the point was wrong.>

And just what percentage of people would you say fall into the category? Probably no more than one in a million. It was a new story for me and I enjoyed it, so sue me. Sally Simpson was just telling an amusing anecdote and you have to "contradict" him with some pedantic hair-splitting arguments that are completely beside the point because you can't even bother to click on a link takes all of 10 seconds to read. Then when you miss the point because you're too lazy to click on the link, you have the chutzpah to blame HIM for it! By the way, your "point" about having to include everything in the post instead of providing a link is too silly to comment on, but especially in that case, because it was in graphic format and couldn't be pasted into the post.

<Sally Simpson> took the right approach by just ignoring you and I should have followed his example. Fortunately it's never too late to use the ignore button.

Aug-24-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Hi Petrosianic,

4.B x King on e8 highlights how stupid the rule was and it was soon abolished, if indeed it was ever taken seriously. The rules at that time were a miss-mash differing from country to country, region to region, town to town, club to club.

Staunton laid down 90% of the bones of the rules we use today in the 1850's. FIDE and other at the time governing bodies have been tweaking them ever since.

"....are there any games extant in any database showing this rule in operation? "

Of course no PGN reader would accept leaving a King in check or the taking of a King though countless OTB blitz game have been lost this way. (there probably a few unexplained resignations in Blitz games on this site where a King was left in check.)

Here is a game forcing a King move resulting in a mate in 3.

Lindemann vs Echtermeyer, 1893

I was not telling a story, I was using facts from a book for beginners written in 1835 which I recently happened to be going through looking for something completely different.

I was trying to get some background on this awful game by both sides Cochrane vs A Deschapelles, 1821 I'm thinking due to the play it was possibly a double blindfold game.

Aug-24-17  ughaibu: If a king can be taken, then Carlsen could have taken black's king after Qf1. Assuming that kings can't be taken, the white player, after 1.e4 c5, 2.Nf3 d6, 3.Bb5+ Nf6, might have tried OO+ announcing check. On the other hand, on the principle that the threat is stronger than its execution. . . .
Aug-24-17  Petrosianic: Now, there's supposedly that game where Rubinstein sealed an illegal move deliberately, knowing that the best move was a King move anyway. I forget which one it was, but I know it's in a Tim Krabbe article from the 70's.

There are a few games with illegal moves in them, and I'm not sure how PGN Readers handle them. But I have seen a few engines recently with a check box for whether or not to enforce legal moves, so maybe that's the way they're going.

They're probably going to have to do that because recent rule changes have ensured that there will be more illegal moves in games. You may recall, the old rule was that when an illegal move was discovered while the game was in progress, the position would go back to the point where the illegal move was made. But that was probably impractical, holding up a tournament just because of one game, so a few years back, the rule was changed to where you had to notice the illegal move within 3 moves.

I played a Blitz game years ago in which I castled with Black, not noticing that I was castling into check from a Bishop on a2. We played a couple of more moves, I spotted the check when I was on the move, played Kh8, and the game continued. As a result, I sent it in to Larry Evans as a new definition for Eliot Hearst's chess glossary. Discovered Check: In Blitz Chess, when you suddenly notice that your King has been in check the last three moves.

Aug-24-17  Lambda: <If you make an illegal move then your opponent has the choice of letting you keep it, make another move with the touched piece or force the player to make a King move.>

So... (from the starting position) 1. Bxd8. Can't make another move with the bishop, can't move the king, guess I have to keep the illegal move.

Aug-24-17  ughaibu: Lambda: Great idea! But why not 1.Kxe8?
Aug-24-17  ughaibu: Another point, white can make a different move with the bishop, a different illegal move!
Aug-24-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Hi ughaibu,

"If a king can be taken, then Carlsen could have taken black's king after Qf1."

The whole set of rules is a farce.

Following Lewis's rules in the example given if Carlsen never said 'check' then Karjakin (in 1835) could have played Qf1 announcing 'checkmate' which ends the game. Carlsen cannot take the Black King, the game is over.

Remember, before someone happens along and does not read the whole thread, not my rules, Lewis's rules for Beginners from 1835. Not guidelines, actual rules of the game.

Of course all kinds of rows would have broken out (and probably did) till this rule and the others mentioned were tidied up. Lewis should have been more careful how he worded the rules. (you guys were not around then to correct him!)

One can just imagine the blazing arguments taking place up and down the country. One player clutching Lewis's book.

"You never said 'check' so I am not in check!"

And situations like this are possible. White has just played Ba4 but not announced check.


click for larger view

So Black ignores the unquoted check and play Rc8 White now plays Rh8 which is checkmate. If he does not announce the checkmate then Black can, according to Lewis, play Rc1 and as long as he said 'check' and despite the fact the Black King is in double check White would have to play Bd1.

What a shambles.

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