chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Donald Byrne vs Robert James Fischer
"Donald Duck" (game of the day Aug-13-2011)
US Championship (1958/59), New York, NY USA, rd 7, Dec-28
English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense. Queen's Knight Variation (A16)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

explore this opening
find similar games 6 more D Byrne/Fischer games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can get computer analysis by clicking the "ENGINE" button below the game.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
Aug-16-04  Kaspy2: The "Bremen System" is named after the hometown of Carl Carls (Germany), who had worked it out and was a successful practitioner. Probably even Bobby used his study material.
Apr-11-05  Dick Brain: Did Fischer miss a win in the endgame around move 37-39 or so? It seems that if Whites a-pawn were to fall then Black's a-pawn would waltz in for the queen with his two super bishops.
Sep-05-07  TheaN: You should throw that into an engine... it's very hard to analyze that precisely. Byrne did try to avoid any unwanted capture of his a-pawn (even a sac could prove fatal).

I like the final position, which I can analyze without an engine: 48....Kxf7 49.Be1 Bxb4 50.Kxg3 (Bxa4?? Bd6) a3 51.Bb3 Kg5 52.Kg2 h5 53.Kh1 1/2 1/2.

Jul-13-08  ounos: <Bxa4?? Bd6> Bxa4 is fine to draw (easiest is Bd7 controlling h3 forever)
Aug-13-11  nolanryan: i think maybe its called donald duck because the bishop looks like a duck???
Aug-13-11  abuzic: <Dick Brain: Did Fischer miss a win in the endgame around move 37-39 or so? It seems that if Whites a-pawn were to fall then Black's a-pawn would waltz in for the queen with his two super bishops>

May be white could try to do that with 38...h5 or 38...Bb3 instead of <38...g3> which although opens for the B to h3, however it opens for the opponent B to f3 and the long diagonal and pushes g pawn away from h pawn support early. Black will have better position but winning is not easy.

Aug-13-11  goodevans: To any of the World's nations that participate in cricket, "duck" is synonymous with zero, so I was rather surprised to see this pun associated with a draw.

I'd like to think that there's something more behind the pun than merely one player having the name Donald. If not then I would dub the pun rather a lame duck!

Aug-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: I thought the pun is a reference to "Fischer Fear", that people were already starting to see that this kid was special, especially after the "Game of the Century", played against none other than Donald Byrne.

Maybe the pun refers to the exchange sacrafice, followed by a king side attack, as in "Look out! Duck!"

Aug-13-11  abuzic: <abuzic: May be white could> I meant may be black could try to do that with 38...h5 or 38...Bb3 instead of <38...g3> which although opens for the B to h3, however it opens for the opponent B to f3 and the long diagonal and pushes g pawn away from h pawn support early. Black will have better position but winning is not easy.
Aug-13-11  Llawdogg: This was nothing like their other game.
Aug-13-11  DrMAL: <Dick Brain: Did Fischer miss a win in the endgame around move 37-39 or so?> 38...g3 was clearly a mistake, the best is to use pawn on g4 to block the diagonal and push 38...h5!

This appears to win whether white goes 39.Rc5 or others like 39.d4 but I will put it on Houdini to verify. It seems 39.Rc5 is white's best and loses to 39...Be5! but maybe to 39...h4 as well.

Aug-13-11  DrMAL: Yes, after 38...h5! white's best is 39.Rc5 and 39...Be5! is winning but 39...h4 is not. This is a great game to study!

After 39...Be5! white's best is 40.d4 Bxd4 41.Rxh5 Bb2 42.Rg5 Bxa3 43.Bxg4 Bc4+! 44.Be2 Bb3 45.e5+ Kc7 - +


click for larger view

With 39...h4 white's best is 40.d4! Be3! 41.Rxc6+! Kxc6 42.d5+ Bxd5 43.exd5 Kxd5 44.Bxg4


click for larger view

Black has passed pawn on h4 and superior king placement but with opposite color bishops progess cannot be made (e.g., 44...Kd6 45.Ke2 Bc1 46.Kd3 Bxa3 47.Kc3 Bc1 48.Bh3 Bf4! 49.Kb2 and black cannot move the king far because of the pawn on b5).

Aug-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  maxi: Donald Ducks the attack.
Aug-13-11  Michael1234567891011: according to rybka, black missed 22. bd5 which gives an eval of -1.72. Probably winning for black...oh well an interesting game nonetheless
Aug-13-11  DrMAL: <Michael1234567891011> Yes, 22...Rg4 was an earlier mistake. Not sure if 22...Bd5 wins but 22...Bxa2 probably does. How long did this compute? I will let it compute on Houdini awhile.
Aug-14-11  LIFE Master AJ: <M123> Its seems you are correct. I did not check it with Fritz 12, but 22...Bd5; looks very strong.
Aug-14-11  LIFE Master AJ: Interesting game ... I don't get the "Donald Duck" stuff ... will someone please draw me a picture?
Aug-14-11  DrMAL: Houdini_15a_x64: 29/82 9:35:50 149,573,929,001
+2.14 22. ... Bd5 23.f3 Bxf3 24.Rf1 Qg4 25.Rbe1
+2.05 22. ... Bxa2 23.Ra1 Bd5 24.f3 Bxf3 25.Rf1

With 22...Bd5 white also loses a second pawn for the exchange but opposite color bishops result 23.f3 Bxf3 24.Rf1 Qg4 25.cxd6 Bxd6 26.Rbe1 h5 27.Rf2 Qg3 28.Re6 Rxh4 29.Rxg6+ Qxg6 30.Rxf3


click for larger view

Black can still win with a mistake from white, but otherwise I don't think a win can be had.

With 22...Bxa2 play is similar except black gains three pawns at first 23.Ra1 Bd5 24.f3 Bxf3 25.Rf1 Qg4 26.Bxd6 From here, white's best is to give back the exchange as before 27.Rxf3 Rxf3

Now when the endgame results and one pawn is gained back, the pair of extra pawns are connected 28.Qe2 Rf4 29.Qxg4 Rxg4 30.Rxa5 Rxh4 31.Ra8+ Kg7 32.Rd8 Kf6 33.Rd7 Ke6 34.Rxb7 c5


click for larger view

I don't think this can be won without an error by white either, but with the connected passed pawns black has better chances. Computer evaluations are only useful when variations are played out with strong knowledge of chess.

Aug-14-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  kamalakanta: Life MasterAJ:

I think the "Donald Duck" thing is that Donald Byrne "ducked" a bullet by achieving the draw! So the pun "Donald Duck"....

Aug-14-11  LIFE Master AJ: Ahhh, gotcha. (Thanks.)

I was thinking something more arcane, but that makes sense.

Aug-15-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Fish-burned,no because it is a draw.
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any gratuitous name-calling of any members—including Admin and Owners—or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
Bobby Fischer's U.S. Championship Games
by LionHeart40
English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense. Queen's Knight Variatio
from marwanredman123's favorite games 6 by iago56
Round Seven
from US Championship 1958/59 by suenteus po 147
English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense. Queen's Knight Variatio
from marwanredman123's favorite games 6 by marwanredman123
English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense. Queen's Knight Variatio
from marwanredman123's favorite games 6 by Jaredfchess
August 13: Donald Duck
from Game of the Day 2011 by Phony Benoni


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us


Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC