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William Winter vs Jose Raul Capablanca
"Cold Winter" (game of the day Sep-21-2006)
Hastings (1919), Hastings ENG, rd 5, Aug-15
Four Knights Game: Nimzowitsch (Paulsen) (C49)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-31-14  offramp: In 2014, the annual Hastings tournament has just started. This game is from the 1919 Victory tournament which began the current uninterrupted series.

At the time everyone believed Capablanca that white was lost very early on after his bishop was imprisoned; it took Garry Kasparov to point out that white can build a fortress at move 19 and probably draw.

May-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: Take the rooks off the board and Black wins easily. Kasparov, who idolized Alekhine, needs to show more respect for Capablanca. The White rook cannot passively maintain the pin on the black bishop as part of a drawing strategy. Black pushes the passer to reduce the space to blockade, aggressively moves the king to upin and threaten the white rook, and when necessary uses the dark squared bishop to help control the dark promotion square. Capablanca wins this easy against the entire world of computers because he has a protected passer, an "extra" bishop and a more active king. Essentially, it's Black's three more active pieces -- rook, bishop and king against White's active rook and White must avoid rook exchanges. It's not hard to figure that Capa wins in a cake walk.
May-02-15  offramp: <fredthebear> you should send the findings of your research to GKasparovExworldChamp@hotmail.com.
May-02-15  Howard: Somethin' tells me that's a ficticious email address.
May-02-15  offramp: <offramp:...At the time everyone believed Capablanca that white was lost very early on after his bishop was imprisoned; it took Garry Kasparov to point out that white can build a fortress at move 19 and probably draw.>

I don't have that book any more, but I know that Kasparov's improvement at move 19 was 19.c2-c4.


click for larger view

Does anyone have an idea of how black might win after that suggestion?

May-02-15  Nerwal: <I don't have that book any more, but I know that Kasparov's improvement at move 19 was 19.c2-c4. >

Really ? What had he planned against c6-b5 ?

May-02-15  offramp: <Nerwal: <I don't have that book any more, but I know that Kasparov's improvement at move 19 was 19.c2-c4. > Really ? What had he planned against c6-b5 ?>

The idea was to do as little as possible. ♙b3, Ra1-b1-b2, Rh1-b1, Kf1,Ke1... How does black break through?

Sep-11-15  RookFile: Right. White's problem is that his bishop is entombed on g3. 19. c4 says that black's bishop on d6 isn't much better. Now both sides have a problem rather than one.
Feb-19-17  offramp: In his notes to this game Capablanca gives some advice. Is it any good?

<Only lack of experience can account for this move. White should have considered that a player of my experience and strength could never allow such a move if it were good.>

Does he mean that if we are playing a much stronger player and we think he has made a blunder, that we should just ignore it because he could not possibly blunder?

Feb-19-17  Howard: I've read that little "comment" of Capa's before---if that's not pure arrogance, then I don't know what is.
Feb-19-17  JimNorCal: If you can't see a reason that a move is bad, why not make it? Let the strong player win but learn from the loss.
Feb-19-17  sudoplatov: I would guess that the procedure after 19.c4 would be to play ...c6, then alternate threatening ...b5,...f5, and attacking White's backward d-Pawn. While this plan may not be sufficient, White has no way to oppose it.
Jan-14-18  offramp: <sudoplatov: I would guess that the procedure after 19.c4 would be to play ...c6, then alternate threatening ...b5,...f5, and attacking White's backward d-Pawn. While this plan may not be sufficient, White has no way to oppose it.>

After 19. c4 c6 20. b3 f5 21. exf5+ Rxf5 22. Rae1...


click for larger view

...Black looks a bit better. But the white bishop is no longer trapped and White has some counterplay.

Aug-18-18  DrGridlock: Capablanca's book includes the remainder of the game after 15 ... f6

"so that the student may see how simple it is to win such a game."

Kasparov's rebuttal of 19 c4 quotes Lee Korso:

"not so fast, my friend"

but I don't have access to any line that Kasparov may have given.

Using some computer aided analysis, Black's best option at 19 appears to be Ra6, which prompts 20 b3 from White (if the pawn does not occupy the b3 square, then black's rook will soon occupy it for black!)

Black's idea now is to prepare the f5 advance:

20 ... Be7
21 Kf1 f5

so that after exchanges one of the doubled pawns on the f-file will fall

22 exf5 Rxf5
23 Ke2 Ra8
24 Rae1 Raf8
25 h4 Rxf3
26 Kd2 Kd6

White has "freed" his entraped bishop, but at the cost of a pawn ("[White} can only free [his bishop] at the cost of a pawn and possibly not even then" - Capablanca.) White will open up the e-file, but black will have a passed pawn on the h-file.

27 Rxe5 gxh4
28 Rhe1 gxh3
29 Re6+ Kd7
30 Rxe7+ Kc8
31 fxg3 Rxg3

William Winter - Jose Raul Capablanca


click for larger view

Analysis by Komodo 5r1 32-bit :

1. ³ (-0.68): 32.Rh7 Rd8 33.Ree7 Rgxd3+ 34.Ke2 R3d7 35.Rxd7 Rxd7 36.Rxh6 Rd6 37.Rh5 b6 38.Ke3 Kb7 39.Ke4 Rd4+ 40.Ke3 Rd1 41.Rh3 Re1+ 42.Kd3 Re8 43.Kc3

All rooks are still on the board, and black has a passed pawn on the h-file. Komodo likes black here, but with all rooks on the board, there's still some chess left to play.

Capablanca was overly-optimistic at black's "simple" win - and Kasparov was overly-optimistic at white's "save."

Aug-18-18  TheFocus: <DrGridlock: Capablanca's book includes the remainder of the game after 15 ... f6 "so that the student may see how simple it is to win such a game." Kasparov's rebuttal of 19 c4 quotes Lee Korso:
"not so fast, my friend"
but I don't have access to any line that Kasparov may have given.>

In Kasparov's <My Great Predecessors Part I>. pg. 263 he gives, after 18. Rh1?!: The opening of the h-file does not help White: his Bishop remains unemployed. Much more interesting was the attempt, ignored by all the commentators, to creat a fortress - 18. c4!, for example: 18...c6 19.Rfc1 Rfb8 20.b3 b5 21.Rc3! Rb6 22.Kf1 bxc4 23.dxc4 Rab8 24.Ra3! (but not 24.Rb1? Rb4 with the threat of ...Rxa4) and Ke2-d2-c2.>

Aug-21-18  DrGridlock: Thanks for the line.
Looking at that with a computer, the same themes persist: at some point black is going to try to force f5, and then prey on white's doubled f-pawns. Kasparov's innovation seems to be to defend his b-pawn along the 3rd row (a3 and c3), rather than on the b-file (b1 and b2). I'm not sure what advantage this gives - especially since it "maroons" one of his rooks on a3 where it is rather locked out of the action which is to come on the f-file.
Aug-21-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  maxi: In his writings Capa several times gave as his justification for particular move the idea of tempting or luring his opponent into a weak move or plan.
Aug-22-18  gabriel25: <CG> There is something not clear. Why don't I have a right to see previous pages of comment in this game while in others I can? It is inconsequent.
Other than being curious, it is not unfair I haven't paid any money.
Aug-22-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <gabriel25>
What exactly happens when you try the "Earlier Kibitzing" link? W Winter vs Capablanca, 1919
Sep-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  GrahamClayton: <The Focus>
In the Kasparov analysis that you quoted, doesn't 24. ♖aa3 lose immediately to 24...♖b1+ 8. ♔e2 ♖8b2+ 9. ♔e3 ♖e1#?
Sep-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <GrahamClayton: <The Focus> In the Kasparov analysis that you quoted, doesn't 24. ♖aa3 lose immediately to 24...♖b1+ 8. ♔e2 ♖8b2+ 9. ♔e3 ♖e1#?>

Isn't the b-file closed? Did you have 23.bxc4?

Sep-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  GrahamClayton: <keypusher>

Isn't the b-file closed? Did you have 23.bxc4?

<keypusher>
My mistake - I played 23. bxc4 instead of 23. dxc4 when analysing.

May-31-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  kingscrusher: Iconic positional game with the bishop getting imprisoned. Influences ideas of future grandmasters and the plan is evident in for example Short vs Kramnik:

Short vs Kramnik, 2011

May-31-22  AlicesKnight: Alekhine had one of these as well - H Wolf vs Alekhine, 1923 - he points out that "the absence of open lines for Black's Rook and the advantageous position of White's King will occasion Black not a few technical difficulties, even though White's QB remains imprisoned". Perhaps Capa did not regard such things as 'difficulties', given his 'sprezzatura'.
May-31-22  ndg2: White is a piece down, without being a piece down. Amazing!
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