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Garry Kasparov vs Anatoly Karpov
"Crisis in Seville" (game of the day Nov-07-2008)
Kasparov - Karpov World Championship Match (1987), Seville ESP, rd 24, Dec-18
English Opening: Agincourt Defense. Catalan Defense (A13)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 22 times; par: 113 [what's this?]

Annotations by Garry Kasparov.      [1 more game annotated by Kasparov]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-30-09  Kinghunt: <UnicornChessman> after 63... Qc5 black looks fine to me.
Nov-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: this is the famous game 24 that Kasparov had to win, in order to draw this match and retain the title.

< Did anyone notice anything peculiar about move 63 for Kasparov? Kasparov had a potential forcing of zugzwang simply by playing a passive move like f4! No matter where Karpov moved, he would have lost material immediately!>

I was wondering the same thing, looking at this nice bit of chess history. After 63. K-h3, Karpov has to lose a pawn, and the wheels will come off. He may have been just shuffling pieces to make a time control?

BTW, has anyone looked at this game with Fritz or Rybka? In the notes, Kasparov says that his own 33. Q-d1 "is a mistake, and Karpov could have drawn, with accurate play, but Karpov made a later error and handed back the initiative."

Has anyone seen Kasparov's more extensive notes on this game, where the Queen should be placed on move 31? He claims that the arbiter disturbed his concentration by reminding him to write down his moves (Kaspy had forgotten to write down moves 31 and 32), and the tap on the shoulder upset his thinking, and he put his Queen on the wrong square. Its sometimes hard to tell when a chess great is telling the truth, or BSing a little to milk the drama in a situation....any ideas?

Nov-16-09  Kinghunt: <HeMateMe> I think the queen should have gone to b5, with the plan of moving the knight to c6 and making all kinds of threats against the king, queen, and a4 knight. Qd1 allows Nc5!, which should allow black to defend adequately.
Dec-20-09  onesax: <UnicornChessman> and <HeMateMe>, I'd have to say that 63. Bd1 was the correct move. If you're wondering why Garry didn't try to exploit zugzwang to win the e6-pawn, it's because he'd be unnecessarily opening up his own 2nd rank to the possibility of a perpetual check from the black queen. Let's see:

63. f4? is met by 63. ... Qc5, as <Kinghunt> has said, and black is fine. White's biggest problem now is that the perpetual is on. Say for example white now grabs the pawn with 64. Bxe6, black has the perpetual on f2 and f1 with 64. ... Qf2+ because the white king is trapped to the squares h1, h2 and h3.

Not quite throwing the game away as quickly would be 63. Kh3?!, but again White isn't gaining anything by going after the e6-pawn like this. Black now has the threatening 63. ... Qa8! which threatens mate (!) on h1. Now to prevent this, white can either repeat moves with 64. Kh2 Qc8 (which would be best, letting him get back to the winning Bd1 idea), or he can play the ugly 64. f3? again with the weakening of the 2nd rank. White would end up winning material here, just as in the game, but the key difference would be that his king doesn't have nearly as much room to hide, I haven't looked at it with a computer but there may well be a perpetual.

Feb-03-10  Sularus: The last moments in video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sW6l...

Feb-03-10  KingG: <Sularus> Thanks for that. It's amazing that they started analysing the game immediately afterwards. I doubt Karpov was really in the mood, poor guy. He took it quite calmly though. I doubt Kasparov would have reacted in quite the same way had he just lost such a game.
Feb-03-10  Sularus: <KingG> No problem!

I watched the video again and I am somewhat confused because it says there EXPO'92. I googled EXPO'92 but failed to reconcile 1987 and '92. I am not even sure if the text on the stage says World Chess Championship.

In the end, the position of the pieces settled any doubt on my mind.

Feb-03-10  KingG: <I watched the video again and I am somewhat confused because it says there EXPO'92> I think it was advertising for the 1992 World Exposition(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sevill...), which was also due to take place in Seville. Kind of like how in the run-up to an Olympics you will see logos all over the place in the city where it is going to take place.
Feb-25-10  nelech: In his book Kasparov gives this winning variation : 33 Qb5! Kh7 34 Nc6 Qa8 35 Qd3+ f5 36 Qd8 Nc5 37 Qe8! f4 38 Kg2 Qb7 39 Bh5 Ne7 40 Kg1! Qd7 (?) 41 Nxe7 but what happen if 40 ...Qxc6 ? I don't see a win there
Sep-02-10  AVRO38: This game is a Reti/Neo-Catalan not an English.
Sep-20-10  SetNoEscapeOn: <nelech>

If 40...Qxc6, then Bg6+! snags black's queen.

Feb-17-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <KingG: <Sularus> Thanks for that. It's amazing that they started analysing the game immediately afterwards. I doubt Karpov was really in the mood, poor guy. He took it quite calmly though. *** >

I am sure Karpov would have taken great satisfaction if he had regained the world championship in this match, but his disappointment was no doubt mitigated by the reflection that he had already had a distinguished ten-year reign as world champion from 1975-1985.

Feb-17-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: BTW, why do the captions for so many important games in this database have incorrect dates. This game was played December 17-18, 1987 (not January 25th).
Jun-25-12  Akshay999: Why am I unable to see a win for White in this game at the end? Surely Karpov cannot win it... but why resign?
Sep-06-12  Conrad93: 33. Bh5 was probably the move Kasparov meant to play.

After 33...g6 white can sacrifice the bishop with 34. Bxg6!.

The pawn can't be taken because of 34...fxg6 Qxg6 when white is forced to lose material after moving the king.

Sep-06-12  Conrad93: Conrad93: Karpov is forced to the defense of both his pawn and knight, while the white queen and bishop are free to roam all over the board with numerous threats. Karpov would have no choice but eventually lose as he has no way to defend all of his pieces at once.

It would just be slow torture for Karpov, and I'm sure he was already exhausted by this point.

Aug-09-13  landogriffin: @Akshay999: Bd1-f3-e4-xg6
Mar-17-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: I could never bear to play through this game more than once. I was rooting for Karpov, and I had predicted to Martin Barkwill that Karpov would win game 23 and then win the title back. KARPOV was do close to proving me right.
Sep-03-15  RookFile: If Karpov could have been prepared to play 1....e5 instead of 1...e6, I think he may have at least drawn this game.
Sep-03-15  Howard: So, where was the point of no return in this very crucial game? In other words, at one point did Karpov throw away the draw for good ?
Sep-03-15  Jim Bartle: <If Karpov could have been prepared to play 1....e5 instead of 1...e6, I think he may have at least drawn this game.>

He had already played it five times in 11 games (2 wins, 2 losses, 1 draw) in this match, so I suspect he was "prepared."

Sep-03-15  Everett: <Sep-03-15 Howard: So, where was the point of no return in this very crucial game? In other words, at one point did Karpov throw away the draw for good ?>

Karpov missed an equalizing improvement before the time control (see previous posts) and then it seems 42..g6 is roundly condemned by most. Perhaps trying to defend Black without the g6-h5 pawn formation is a good place for investigation.

Sep-03-15  RookFile: Sure Jim. I remember some of those games. Evidently Karpov wasn't mentally prepared. Somehow Kasparov knew going into this game it was going to be a long siege, and Karpov was coorperative. As it was, Karpov almost did what he needed to do.
Sep-03-15  Jim Bartle: Maybe Karpov thought it would be easier to draw playing the Queens Gambit than the English. But Kasparov played into the Reti.
Sep-04-15  Everett: <Sep-03-15 RookFile: Sure Jim. I remember some of those games. <Evidently Karpov wasn't mentally prepared.> Somehow Kasparov knew going into this game it was going to be a long siege, and Karpov was coorperative. As it was, Karpov almost did what he needed to do.>

Interesting that you think Karpov's choice of opening came from such a negative place when you have the option many explanations.

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