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Anatoly Karpov vs Garry Kasparov
Belfort World Cup (1988), Belfort FRA, rd 14, Jul-01
Gruenfeld Defense: Exchange. Seville Variation (D87)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 1 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-26-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  Open Defence: This is actually a wonderful game from Karpov though there are no pretty combinations (that's not Karpov's style really)

The Queen moves between moves 18 to 30 are simply outstanding and showcase Karpov's style

Oct-26-03  drukenknight: there is not much going on until Kasparov decides to sac the exchange (no reflection on Karpov though if this is all that Gary can do)

But if you give up material why not then put pressure on the K, what if 31 ...Nb2?

Oct-26-03  drukenknight: yes there's a lot going on here.
Oct-26-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  Open Defence: 32Nxb4 .. hmm is that it ? 32Nxb4 Qf7 (to prevent Ne6) 33Qxf7+ Kxf7 is that the line to follow ?
Oct-26-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  Open Defence: I deleted some of the earlier posts .. well i misunderstood DK's first post, I thought he meant 30..Nb2 (instead of Rxf2), I though the threat of 31e6 forced the exchange sac, I may be wrong... maybe the other guys can get in on this and see if I am right ?

Then I saw that DK meant 31 Nb2 after 30 .. Rxf2 .. why not 32Nxb4 which protects d3 and threatens Ne6+ ? hmmm more analysis needed ?

Oct-26-03  skakmiv: Yeah, 32.Nxc5 (I guess that is what you meant) protects d3.
Oct-26-03  tud: 31...Nb2 32Nc5 + -
Oct-26-03  drukenknight: yes I am over my head, I need to sit down and really look at this
Oct-27-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  Open Defence: Yeah TYPO ALERT*** 32Nxc5 heheehehhe, I really haven't made a good first impression have I? haha :-D, protects d3 and threatens Ne6....
Oct-27-03  drukenknight: a better idea: 29...Nd2 w/idea of getting Qa2 with Q/R pressure on f2.
Oct-27-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  Open Defence: and how do you defend against the threat of Ne6+ after Nxc5?, the java is busted on this computer so I dont have the board in front of me, but from memory i think Ne6+ needs to be defended against doesn't it ?
Oct-27-03  drukenknight: you have a good memory. He wants to go Ne5 and then Nxh6+. at the moment blacks B is pinned. But I think black waits to move the K only when the N is about to take Nxh6. You are onto something good here, let me set this up...
Mar-31-04  Lawrence: eval +6.58 Junior 8
Mar-31-04  Paul123: Karpov really took it to Kasparov when he played the Grunfeld . Same in 1984 when Kasparov played the Tarrasch. Out of all the intense World Championship games they played between each other, only three games separate the winner from the loser. Chess defiantly misses that type of rivalry. Until we the fans get serious and demand a real championship cycle I don’t think we will see rivalries like this again.
Sep-17-05  agressivechess: I have to ask something to open defence who told that 32.Nxc5 is strong but I would like to clarify what would happen after 32...-Qxd4+
Sep-17-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <aggressivechess>
Read the whole thread, what they were discussing was if Black varies first with 31...Nb2, only then 32. Nxc5 so white still has a pawn on c3 preventing 32...Qxd4+.
Sep-18-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Open Defence: wow after nearly two years there are still references to my posts here :-D
Aug-08-06  positionalgenius: Kasparov loses another Grunfeld to Karpov-you'd think he would just give it up after falling to another karpov brilliancy like this one.
Aug-23-06  positionalgenius: This could be my favorite Karpov game of all time.A crushing victory.
Aug-23-06  positionalgenius: <syracrophy>LOOK AT THIS GAME.Its one of my favorite Karpov games.
Mar-21-07  TrueFiendish: To me 29.e6 looks pretty darn strong. It could be followed by Nh5 or Nf5 with the nasty threat of Qg6. Am I missing something?
Mar-21-07  Billy Ray Valentine: <positionalgenius: This could be my favorite Karpov game of all time.A crushing victory.>

That's quite a compliment for this game, given all the great games Karpov has played over the years.

My favorite Karpov games are:

Karpov vs Unzicker, 1974
Kasparov vs Karpov, 1984
Karpov vs Kasparov, 1984

and perhaps:

Karpov vs Nunn, 1982

Aug-20-08  ToTheDeath: Karpov played a very clear strategic game- control the center, and box in the bishop on g7.

<22. Qg5!> is a star move, provoking ...h6 and denying the g7 bishop an active post at h6. A sloppy move like 22.Qd3 Qd5! (threatening e5) 23. Qc2 Bh6 gives Black counterplay.

Kasparov was looking to win very badly here to prove he was the best after the drawn Seville match. Although he still won the tournament this loss was a heavy blow for him.

"After he congratulated me on the victory I saw tears in his eyes." -Karpov.

Sep-05-08  seeminor: As much as Kasparov scared the hell out of Karpov with the sicilian, Karpov returned the favour with the Grunfeld!
Mar-28-10  SRILANKANMASTER: lol..a pretty beasy victory for Karpov, I must say..and (sigh..) No, my dear black death, the move Qg5 is not really all that much of a brilliancy. It is in fact a trifle obvious..at least, to me, but then, I AM after all, a master of some skill! :) Ah, how the lack of ability at chessgames.com that seems to follow me wherever I go, irks me to the core..sigh...
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