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Boris Spassky vs Anatoly Karpov
Hamburg (1982) (exhibition), Hamburg FRG, Sep-??
King's Gambit: Accepted. Fischer Defense (C34)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-21-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <keypusher> But the Evans did play a decisive role at Hastings. Pillsbury faced it twice, and won both times. http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches... He only won the tournament by half a point, so both wins were critical to his success.
Mar-22-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <FSR: <keypusher> But the Evans did play a decisive role at Hastings. Pillsbury faced it twice, and won both times. http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches... He only won the tournament by half a point, so both wins were critical to his success.>

Well, by that logic each opening in Pillsbury's fifteen wins played a decisive role at Hastings. :-)

It's interesting to compare how the three leaders did against the Evans. Tarrasch sniffed at Lasker for declining the gambit <although he has declared that he knows a winning defence>, but it worked out pretty well:

W Pollock vs Lasker, 1895

Chigorin faced the Evans twice. He won an exciting game against Pollock (W Pollock vs Chigorin, 1895) but blundered into a draw in a totally won position against Bird (Bird vs Chigorin, 1895).

Chigorin was the only one of the three who played the Evans as White, of course. He scored an anemic +1-1=0.

Chigorin vs Gunsberg, 1895

Chigorin vs Steinitz, 1895

So maybe the Evans Gambit really did play a decisive role in this tournament...

At Hastings Pillsbury got a lot of attention for playing the odd "Stone-Ware" defense, as in this nice win over Schiffers.

Schiffers vs Pillsbury, 1895

The following year at Nuremberg he played an inferior countergambit against the same opponent and lost an important game.

Schiffers vs Pillsbury, 1896

Mar-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <keypusher> I hadn't realized that Chigorin had lost an Evans to Steinitz at this tournament. As you've demonstrated, the Evans was even more important to the tournament standings than I'd thought.
Mar-10-16  not not: Spassky should have write a book called "How to play inferior opening vs top rated players... and get away with a win! featuring Fisher, Karpov and other so called greatest"
Mar-11-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <not not: Spassky should have write a book called "How to play inferior opening vs top rated players... and get away with a win! featuring Fisher, Karpov and other so called greatest">

Yeah, none of those titans could play.

You might have mentioned that Spassky was clearly worse against Fischer in the middlegame before the latter blundered.

Mar-11-16  Rookiepawn: Back to the KG, it seems KG has been thoroughly analyzed with a cluster of engines and the conclusion is that with perfect play it only renders a draw for White.

I think that from a practical point of view it still can be played against humans.

http://en.chessbase.com/post/rajlic...

Mar-11-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Bobby Spassky: Dear Rookiepawn:,

Did you notice this was posted near April fool's day?

Mar-11-16  RookFile: I know a 2100 player who said that he played the King's Gambit for 20 years in tournament play. He says that the only line he never saw was the classic "main line" that was all the rage in the 1800's.
Mar-15-16  Rookiepawn: <Bobby Spassky: Dear Rookiepawn:, Did you notice this was posted near April fool's day?>

Call me a fool, but "near" is not the day itself. And the note seems pretty long for a joke.

Mar-15-16  disasterion: <Rookiepawn> Chessbase did their best to make it as convincing as possible. Have a look at this:

http://en.chessbase.com/post/the-ch...

Mar-20-16  not not: perfidious: <not not: Spassky should have write a book called "How to play inferior opening vs top rated players... and get away with a win! featuring Fisher, Karpov and other so called greatest"> Yeah, none of those titans could play.

You might have mentioned that Spassky was clearly worse against Fischer in the middlegame before the latter blundered.

i did say it by using "inferior" - he was worse vs Karpov too most of the game;

whether he could get away with it (being pawn down and worse position in middle game) vs Lasker, Capa, or Alekhine, I am not that sure

Apr-29-16  Rookiepawn: <disasterion: <Rookiepawn> Chessbase did their best to make it as convincing as possible. Have a look at this: http://en.chessbase.com/post/the-ch...

April's Fool is not anymore what it used to be.

Oct-15-16  Allanur: King's Gambit is reckoned weak opening, it is assumed that black will be ahead with accepting the pawn. Boris used it very well against top players.

I once set my droidfish to play this opening. The initial board was: 1.e4- e5 2.f4 played and it was black to move. The time was 120 minutes plus 60 seconds increment. Black won.

Nov-04-16  Petrosianic: So, where exactly does Black go wrong here? Just from a quick play-through, I'm assuming it's 41...b5. There's no way he's worse at Move 40.
Nov-04-16  Petrosianic: Yeah, b5 is the lemon. Black wins fairly easily with something like 41...Ra1. Not sure how Black makes a mistake like this on Move 41.

Although Black surely isn't lost even after b5. In fact, I'd swear Black isn't lost until his very last move. After 83...Kd6, I don't see any clear followup for White.

Nov-04-16  Olavi: This tournament was a TV cup with one hour games. According to the tny book Karpov had less than 2 minutes already after move 23.
Feb-05-18  Nic Olas: I have just found and watched the rapid tiebreak to this tv tournament between Boris Spassky and Anatoly Karpov. It is really entertaining and shows how far chess broadcasting has come since then https://youtu.be/-kzM1syPiuY
Feb-06-18  WorstPlayerEver: Let's see what happened here; chessbase dot com managed to find the dumbest sheet and then posted a pic of them and his waif.
Jun-18-18  Omnipotent00001: 44...Kb6 draws.
Apr-30-19  saintdufus: You hear stories about post-1972 Spassky "drawing his games quickly so he could go play tennis", but this game must have required immense energy to pull off.
Mar-23-20  Chesgambit: 41... g5 wins
Mar-23-20  Chesgambit: 83... Kd6 draws
Nov-03-20  Whitehat1963: Fantastic game! Opening of the Day.
Mar-15-21  Dragi: Time trouble for the Great Karpov?40. Re2.!!... Wins the game
Dec-20-21  Allanur: It is good to see Spassky being able to not bottle a leading endgame to Karpov. I know of 3-4 games where Spassky was superior yet somehow managed to lose to Karpov but in this endgame he somehow managed to win.
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