chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing
Garry Kasparov vs Tigran V Petrosian
Niksic (1983), Niksic YUG, rd 2, Aug-25
Dutch Defense: Classical. Stonewall Variation Botvinnik Variation (A93)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 30 times; par: 72 [what's this?]

explore this opening
find similar games 4 more Kasparov/Petrosian games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: Some games have photographs. These are denoted in the game list with the icon.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-11-12  ephesians: I agree that from a sporting point of view, adjournments are bad.

On the other hand, i sure learned a lot about endgames from studying adjournments.

Mar-11-12  SimonWebbsTiger: even worse than adjournments, which I don't think anyone really liked because it involved losing a lot of sleep and not being mentally and physically fresh for the next round game, was the practice of adjudication. Games would simply stop at a specified time and the result called by stronger players. They used that in British club chess; I doubt the actual players gained anything from it in terms of improving their practical chess skills.

Chess has perhaps gained a new gauge of strength with the abolition of adjournments. You have to know your endgames and have technique from previous home study and training. The flip side -- as noted by GMs like Timman and Portisch -- is players can't produce beautiful endgames because they don't really have the time to ponder endgame positions as time tends to be short when they get there.

Mar-12-12  Everett: <SimonWebbsTiger> I think the need for practical endgame skill without adjournments is absolutely great, and is a truer indicator of strength than having friends help you with the homework.

In a way, any "beautiful endgames" created after adjournment lose their luster a bit.

Apr-13-12  ozmikey: 46...Ne3 is an interesting possibility. White can't take the bishop (47. Rxf7+? Kg6 and White will have to give up his rook to prevent the mate by 48...Nf1+ and 49...Rxh2), and he probably has to block his own h-pawn by 47. Kh3. Certainly not quite so easy for White to win after that.
Jul-13-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eggman: "If your opponent wants to play the Dutch, you should prevent him!"

-Tigran Petrosian

Jul-13-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: < SimonWebbsTiger: even worse....was the practice of adjudication. Games would simply stop at a specified time and the result called by stronger players. They used that in British club chess; I doubt the actual players gained anything from it in terms of improving their practical chess skills....>

Even in my early playing days (1972-73) here in USA games were adjudicated now and again. A dreadful practice and I'm thankful it's gone.

In an interview with CHO'D Alexander, Larsen was critical of adjudications; I believe he stated that they reduced fighting spirit and that players didn't learn endings.

Jul-13-12  Petrosianic: Adjudication was never very common, especially at the top level. I think in both volumes of The Games of Tigran Petrosian, there's maybe one game (from the 1940's) that was decided that way.

It was more common at lower levels, though. In some of the High School tournaments we played in, they had to adjudicate in order to get the required rounds in.

I once heard a story (don't remember the details) about a New England tournament director, who adjudicated his own game (because he was the highest rated player available), and for the life of him couldn't see any conflict of interest when he gave himself a win.

Jul-13-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Petrosianic> This was probably before my time in New England chess; at any rate I've never heard that one.

The following happened to me once though in an event back in 1981/82 in Vermont, so strict USCF rules weren't used, though the rulebook was to hand and invoked-or not-as needed:

It's the last round, I'm 4-0 and have somehow gotten three Blacks despite being the highest-rated player in the tournament. The TD and I met. He too had got three Blacks, so somehow he assigned me a fourth (third in a row, no less!). No protests would change his mind, as he was what one would politely call stubborn. In the end, he got his, as I ground him down despite his machinations.

Jul-13-12  Petrosianic: I'm not sure what the letter of the rules said, but what do you do if a TD hands out a blatantly illegal pairing?

I'm surprised the TD would have given himself 3 blacks in the first 4 rounds. Maybe he expected to win the earlier rounds and was saving a White for the end? It does show the problems with having a TD play in his own tournaments. In our club, the regular TD did sometimes play, but as he was only rated about 1500, it didn't matter much.

I don't think I ever had an adjudication in a rated event. I had a couple in High School tournaments, that had maybe 100 players in them from different schools, but they were unrated.

Jul-13-12  Shams: <No protests would change his mind, as he was what one would politely call stubborn.>

He deliberately broke the rule to favor himself, then stuck by it when you pointed it out? I would have fired off a short letter to USCF. If a stunt like that isn't enough to have one's arbiter status revoked, what would it take?

Jul-13-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Petrosianic> Here's a simple example of the slapdash way this TD paired players:

Eight-player tourney, all the top seeds win and 1 gets White in round 1, etc. What do YOU do for colour allocation in round two? If your answer is flip the third and fourth players (the way you're generally supposed to), wrong! He'd pair 3 vs 1 and 4 vs 2. It isn't hard to imagine all the problems one would have with colours down the road, especially when both lower-rated players win that second round.

Jul-29-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: < Shams: <No protests would change his mind, as he was what one would politely call stubborn.> He deliberately broke the rule to favor himself, then stuck by it when you pointed it out? I would have fired off a short letter to USCF. If a stunt like that isn't enough to have one's arbiter status revoked, what would it take?>

One small problem: 1980s chess in Burlington, Vermont wasn't USCF rated-it might be said that it was the only game in town.

This TD was also fond of a particular saying: 'Listen to what your higher-rated players say, then do the opposite.'

Jul-29-12  Shams: <1980s chess in Burlington, Vermont wasn't USCF rated-it might be said that it was the only game in town.>

Someday we are going to have to explain to people what life was like before the internet. I don't like our chances.

Nov-28-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Reading the anecdote quoted by <kasparvez> is revealing indeed, and displays Spassky's keen psychological insight into his two-time opponent for the title.

Not sure whether Spassky ever came out and said so directly, but I have the impression that he did not especially care for Petrosian. At Moscow 1975, Spassky helped Korchnoi during the adjournment of Korchnoi vs Petrosian, 1975. This was, of course, before they fell out in their candidates final at Belgrade two years later.

Nov-28-13  RedShield: <Not sure whether Spassky ever came out>

I would have heard.

Nov-25-16  Muttley101: <Eggman: "If your opponent wants to play the Dutch, you should prevent him!"

-Tigran Petrosian>

I was just browsing the comments on this game, and came across the above. I don't know if anyone corrected this (it seems not), but this is the exact opposite of what Petrosian said- "If your opponent wants to play the Dutch, you should let him!" Possibly the commenter meant this, and typed "should" instead of "shouldn't"." But the irony of Petrosian playing the Stonewall Dutch shouldn't be lost.

If I recall correctly, it was quoted in the excellent "Skopje Olympiad 1972" by Batsford (one of Keene's better works), in the notes to the game Petrosian - Hug, in which (again, from memory), Hug resigned because he was so depressed with his position. Another anecdote- Donner resigned a game against Petrosian in the Piatsigorsky Cup tournament they played in because, he commented, he was tired of the cat and mouse game (again, possible not entirely accurate).

The point is, Petrosian was superb at testing his opponents by manoeuvring and tacking, teasing out small advantages, and wearing them down in the process.

Sound familiar?

Nov-25-16  Howard: A similar comment by Iron Tigran was quoted in the book on the San Antonio 1972 tournament. In Petrosian's game with Larsen, the latter played the Dutch---and Petrosian was quoted as saying, "Oh, goody! I love playing against the Dutch."
Jan-15-18  RookFile: 19....dxc4 from Petrosian was pretty shocking. And he almost made it work too. I think most people wouldn't have even considered the move. A more typical Petrosian move would have been ... Kh8, waiting.
Jan-15-18  Granny O Doul: Re: perfidious above--In "Bobby Fischer vs. the Rest of the World", the author Brad Darrach (I think; otherwise I guess it was Harry Benson) has told Spassky that he (Darrach or Benson) has never met Petrosian, and Spassky replies "you haven't missed much".
Jan-15-18  Petrosianic: <I was just browsing the comments on this game, and came across the above. I don't know if anyone corrected this (it seems not), but this is the exact opposite of what Petrosian said- "If your opponent wants to play the Dutch, you should let him!">

That's what he said. In fact, he said that most GM's like playing against it.

The comments are from his notes on this game:

Petrosian vs Larsen, 1972

After 1. d4 e6, he ponders how to continue. If he plays 2. e4, it's a French. If 2. c4, it's probably a QGD. But if 2. Nf3, knowing Larsen, it would be a Dutch! So that made it the move of choice.

Jan-16-18  Howard: The late Kim Commons mentioned Petrosian's "Oh, goody!" remark back in a late 1977 issue of CL&R. Commons also said that he felt that "the Dutch stinks".
Mar-10-19  Muttley101: The funny thing about Petrosian's pleasure at playing against the Dutch, then playing a Stonewall against Kasparov, was that he was a destroyer of the KID also, of course- another unsound opening (but just try beating it). Yet Petrosian also played the KID a great deal also, and very effectively.
Dec-23-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: <ozmikey: 46...Ne3 is an interesting possibility. White can't take the bishop (47. Rxf7+? Kg6 and White will have to give up his rook to prevent the mate by 48...Nf1+ and 49...Rxh2), and he probably has to block his own h-pawn by 47. Kh3. Certainly not quite so easy for White to win after that.>

46...Ne3 with a threat 47...Nf1+ 48.Kh3 Rxh2# is a good try but white can cover it not only by 47.Kh3 but also by 47.Bd6. 46...Ne3 47.Bd6 Nf1+ (or 47...Kg6 48.h4) 48.Kh3 Kg6 49.Rb6 Kh7 50.Be5 leads to an attack, which black cannot survive.

Dec-23-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: 44...g5+ looks like a decisive mistake. 44...Nd2 or 44...h5 would have been probably lesser evil.
Aug-11-20  Albion 1959: The new kid on the block, begins to take control of the old maestro and former champion. Having lost his first two games against TP, Kasparov powers ahead and the following year was challenging Karpov for the world title:
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>

NOTE: Create an account today to post replies and access other powerful features which are available only to registered users. Becoming a member is free, anonymous, and takes less than 1 minute! If you already have a username, then simply login login under your username now to join the discussion.

Please observe our posting guidelines:

  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate, or gibberish posts.
  3. No vitriolic or systematic personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No cyberstalking or malicious posting of negative or private information (doxing/doxxing) of members.
  6. No trolling.
  7. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by moderators, create a false impression of consensus or support, or stage conversations, is prohibited.

Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.

Blow the Whistle

See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a moderator.


NOTE: Please keep all discussion on-topic. This forum is for this specific game only. To discuss chess or this site in general, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
All moderator actions taken are ultimately at the sole discretion of the administration.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
classic encounter!!
from iking's favorite games 3 by iking
1983#5 A new WC on the rise beating an old one
from Notable Chessgames of the 1980's by Jaredfchess
Saniyat24's favorite games part 3
by Saniyat24
Game 84
from Part 1: 1973-1985 (Kasparov) by Qindarka
Game collection: 101
by cgrob
Chess Informant Best Games 2
by Nimzophile
Kasparov The Killer!!
by Zhbugnoimt
Dutch Classical. Stonewall Be7 Botvinnik (A93) 1-0 Remove the D
from GK Collection on the move to Fredthebear's den by fredthebear
Dutch Defense: Classical. Stonewall Variation Botvinnik Var
from KASPAROV GAMES GTM by gambitfan
grincho13's favorite games
by grincho13
Dutch Stonewall Intro by Aagaard
by kenilworthian
Kasparov The Killer!!
by chezstartz
Chess Informant Best Games 2
by koinonia
The Dutch Defense (and Anglo-dutch)
by Zhbugnoimt
DUTCH DEFENSE GTM
by gambitfan
Dutch Defense: Classical. Stonewall, Botvinnik Var (A93) 1-0
from White Walls, Black Stones, and Read Newspapers by fredthebear
Size GAZA
by lonchaney
Stonewall
by ISeth
senakash's favorite games garry
by senakash

Home | About | Login | Logout | F.A.Q. | Profile | Preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | New Kibitzing | Chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | Privacy Notice | Contact Us

Copyright 2001-2021, Chessgames Services LLC