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Garry Kasparov vs Andrei Sokolov
Belfort World Cup (1988), Belfort FRA, rd 15, Jul-03
English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense. Flohr-Mikenas-Carls Variation Nei Gambit (A19)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Given 1 time; par: 82 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jul-19-04  gmann: If Black fails to capture on b6 after 28. Rxd4 and instead chooses to grab the rook (28...exd4), White has excellent (and devastating?) play with 29.Bxd4 with a rook pin. From my analysis it looks like Black's must either put his d8-Knight on e6 to avoid mate following the inevitable rook capture on f6, or simply advance to h6. In either case White is up a Knight and pawn in the exchange.
Jun-24-06  LluviaSean: Sokalov was winning at least in material here. He must have made an inaccuracy in the endgame, though I cannot find it... Can you help me out?
Jun-24-06  TommyC: LluviaSean - I am not sure if he made an innacuracy or not, but the endgame was certainly far harder for black than white, despite the slight material advantage. White's pieces were extremely active, creating direct threats on many moves, and black's knights especially very awkward - the endgame is an example of how powerful the open bishops are on an open board, and how cumbersome knights can be without solid outposts. The special factor enhancing this principle was white's control of the g-file, which in some positions meant he was threating to mate with Bxe5, for instance. Hope this helps.
Apr-24-17  Saniyat24: great game...!
Sep-18-17  Ironmanth: Wonderful game for study and improvement. Thanks for this one, chessgames!

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