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Garry Kasparov vs Dov Zifroni
"When Dovs Cry" (game of the day Jan-09-2016)
Clock simul, 15b (1994), Tel Aviv ISR, Oct-04
French Defense: Tarrasch Variation. Open System Main Line (C09)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jan-22-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: Much of this post is probably obvious to the majority of players here, but there is no kabitzing on this game, and it deserves attention. Kaspy's play is superb, and his handling of the white side provides yet another great lesson on the attack against an isolated D pawn.

15. Bxe7
Many of us lesser mortals cringe at so easily giving up the bishop for knight, yet Garry clearly assesses that the dark squared bishop is of little value against the isolani, since it is blockaded on a light square, whereas the bishop has a noble purpose removing one of the d pawn's potential defenders.

15. ..Nxe7
Capturing the bishop with queen just helps white double his rooks more quickly after Nf5! and Bxe7 leaves the knight on a poor square, after which Rad1 and the pressure builds.

For the next 15 moves Kaspy ties black down to the defense of his isolani. By move 29 it appears white has done all he is going to do against the d pawn.

30. h4 gives the appearance of a waiting move, yet it is not without purpose. Since black is tied to the defense of the d pawn, at least until the K reaches e6, white will be first on the H file.
After 31. ...hxg5 white has no obvious clear way to increase the pressure on the d pawn and thus seeks to create new alternate paths for his rooks, beginning with Kg2 (to clear the way for Rh1).

After move 33 the most interesting feature is the relative position of the knights. The black N seems poorly placed, but the white N has superior attack potential while limiting the squares available for the black king. Hence, Garry's choice to defend g4 with his king! He then embarks on a subtle strategy to overload the defense of the black pawns.

35. ...Kf5
to counter the threat of a pin with Rh6 and to add defense to the f pawn. The white knight proves to be an annoyance, yet black can not easily dislodge it. For example,
35 ..Ne5+?, Nxe5 Kxe5, gxf+ and Rh5+.
Black also does not want to lose a pawn with
Rh6 Kf5, gxf! gxf (Nxf4?? Rf6++), RxN KxR, Ne5+ Kf5, NxR RxN, Rd4!

36.Rhd1 might look like back-peddling, but white must not allow d4 yet.

37. R3d2!
White controls d4 while preparing to take over the e file. Again, Ne5+ is bad. White can trade knights and check on e2, trade pawns, and lift the other rook to d4.

After 39. Rde1 black does not have time for d4 as 40.Rd6! threatens mate at f6 and R7d6 fails to Nh6++.

41. Rh7! Again, the mate threat.

42. ..Nh8 Testimony to the horrible position of Ng6. white continually finds new paths to the black king, who is desperate to find flight.

45. Rc6+
Blacks position finally collapses. Obviously not
a) ..Kh5 Rh6 mate. White also mates with
b) ..Kf7, Rf6+ followed by Rxg5+ and Rh6++. Alternatives drop a rook (and eventually the knight) with the idea
c) ..Kh7 Rh6+ and Rxg5+ Rf6+ Re5+

Blocking check with the knight at any time changes nothing, and a rook spite check on d3 only postpones the inevitable a few moves. It's over.

Jan-09-16  RookFile: A Karpov like win from Kasparov, and a reminder that super GMs are skilled in all phases of the game.
Jan-09-16  mruknowwho: I found Black's decision to ignore 41.Rh7 by playing 40...d4 to be an interesting decision. If it were me, I think I would have played 40...R8d7.
Jan-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: Interesting board wide maneuvering
Jan-09-16  Sularus: excellent use of the open files by kaspy
Jan-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Kasparov can win a game in multiple way. Here the rooks dominate.
Jan-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: The GOTD title is a reference to a 32-year-old song <When Doves Cry> by the artist Prince, who at one time became "The Artist Formerly Known as Prince", only to become Prince once again, later on.

When the song came out I thought it was cool, but nowadays lyrics such as <animals strike curious poses. They feel the heat, the heat between me an you> sound not only preposterous but self-centered as well.

Jan-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Check It Out: Nice post, <PawnSac>.
Jan-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: <thegoodanarchist> heh, I know a lot of very popular, and melody-wise beautiful, songs that you'll never like again once you've actually paid attention to the lyrics. ;s

BTW, funnily enough, the Hebrew name/word Dov means 'bear', rather than dove. :)

Jan-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <Annie> That's 'bear' as in 'ursine mammal' rather than 'bear' as in 'carry', I imagine?

And no connection, of course, with the homophone bare = strip.

Speakina 'dov' ... Americans routinely use 'dove' (with a long 'o', I think) to represent the past tense of the verb 'to dive'. In Britain and Ireland, 'dived' is the norm.

Jan-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <A> - <I know a lot of very popular, and melody-wise beautiful, songs...>

Rilly? I had the impression that you and songs were strangers to one another. Particularly lyrics.

Jan-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: Speakina 'dov' ... Americans routinely use 'dove' (with a long 'o', I think) to represent the past tense of the verb 'to dive'. In Britain and Ireland, 'dived' is the norm.

If it was "White Cliffs of Diver" it may not have worked...

Jan-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <moronovich> The Dover cliffs are iconic, but don't really amount to much. If you want big sheer cliffs, try the west coast of Ireland -- the Cliffs of Moher in Clare, or Slieve League in Donegal.
Jan-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: <Domdaniel: <moronovich> The Dover cliffs are iconic, but don't really amount to much. If you want big sheer cliffs, try the west coast of Ireland -- the Cliffs of Moher in Clare, or Slieve League in Donegal.>

As usual I trust you <Dom>,but if you put spitfires and lancasters into the eguation I am not shure these brave fighters counted in quantité.

Jan-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: < Domdaniel: <moronovich> The Dover cliffs are iconic, but don't really amount to much. If you want big sheer cliffs, try the west coast of Ireland -- the Cliffs of Moher in Clare, or Slieve League in Donegal.>

Impressive cliffs, and they made the list of the top 18. But Kalaupapa in Hawaii is much higher than either.

Here is a link to the list. When you look at #17, try not to think "Skanks' Booty"

http://www.touropia.com/most-dramat...

Jan-09-16  schnarre: ...Good analysis PawnSac!
Jan-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: Bear, that would be the big animal, and no other meaning, yep.

I don't listen to music these days, but I heard a lot of songs up to about 20 years ago, and know their lyrics too. :)

Jan-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <Annie> -- <I don't listen to music these days> Me neither, at least not very much ... I just have a fairly good memory for stuff that I've listened to in the past.

Maybe we should both try listening to music again -- never mind what kind. After all, listening to music is supposedly a good thing, whether it's Bach or Nine Inch Nails. (Both of which I like, incidentally.)

Jan-10-16  ASchultz: Thanks to PawnSac for the great analysis.

And I actually knew Dov meant Bear too, thanks to reading Chaim Potok's The Chosen many years ago. I recommend that book.

Jan-12-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <thegoodanarchist> - <Impressive cliffs, and they made the list of the top 18. But Kalaupapa in Hawaii is much higher than either.>

I don't doubt it: actually, I expect it ... expect to find that the highest, tallest, biggest, etc is in some other part of the world.

Thing is, my generation in Ireland were taught that this country was utterly mediocre ... all the highest and best things were elsewhere,

And then, in the past 20 years, they found minerals in the ground, oil and gas offshore, huge waves on the west coast, great food and drink, and much more. We had to grasp the concept of being good at certain things.

So there's a big wave in Hawaii? Cool. The Irish wave is still among the best in Europe, which nobody here anticipated until recently.

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