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Paul Keres vs Jaroslav Sajtar
Amsterdam ol (Men) fin-A (1954), Amsterdam NED, rd 10, Sep-23
Sicilian Defense: Najdorf Variation (B94)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Apr-07-03  aulero: Golombek (Times 2.7.1977):

“Little Estonia long shadow… At Amsterdam in 1954 he scored 96,4 per cent on fourth board and won another game so brilliant against Sajtar of Czechoslovakia that the Soviet non-playing captain, Kotov, told to me that it was “a true Soviet game”. I told this to Keres who, with the nearest approach to acerbity I ever saw him show, said: “No, it was a true Estonian game.””

Apr-07-03  aulero: 20...Qxb6 21.Qf5+ Kc7 22.Rc3+
20...Bxb6 21.Qf7+ Kd8 22.Qxf6+
Nov-19-05  PARACONT1: gee, guess Keres didn't really like being a Soviet citizen eh? he and Bronstein MUST have been good friends i bet!
Apr-25-06  mtoom: Ethnic Estonians generally despise Russians after WWII... I would know; I am one ;)
Apr-30-06  rigel1503: I am an Aussie of Polish descent. I spent 10 months in Poland as an English Teacher and I can tell you this, just like the Estonians, the Poles after WWII despise the Russians and Germans with equal passion. I can understand where Keres is coming from.
Apr-30-06  rigel1503: if 12. ... Nxf6 then: 13. b3 Qb5
(if 13. ... Qxe4 14. Ng5+ OR 13. ... Qc6 14. Nd8+ forking King and Queen) 14. Nec7 Qc6 15. Nxa8 Nxd5 16. exd5 Qc3 17. Qe1 Qxe1 18. Raxe1 Be7 19. Nb6 Bf5 20. Re3 Bxc2 21. Rc1 Bf5 22. Rc7

if 12. ... gxf6 then: 13. Qh5+ Kxe6 14. Qe8+

Jul-03-06  notyetagm: With 20 ♘xb6+!, Keres rescues his cornered a8-knight:


click for larger view

The variations are quite nice.

If Black captures the White b6-knight with his c6-queen (20 ... ♕xb6), then the Black queen is <DEFLECTED> from defending the Black c8-bishop and White (Keres) wins with the elegant <DOUBLE SKEWER> combination 21 ♕f5+ ♔c7 22 ♖c3+.


click for larger view

The first skewer (21 ♕f5+) goes all the way through and makes the Black c8-bishop loose, and then the second skewer comes (22 ♖c3+) and goes all the way through to put the Black c8-bishop en prise.

If instead Black captures the White b6-knight with his d8-bishop (20 ... ♗xb6), then the Black dark-squared bishop is <DEFLECTED> from controling squares along the h4-d8 diagonal. In particular, after 21 ♕f7+ the Black dark-squared bishop is no longer available to interpose the queen check on e7. After the forced 21 ... ♔d8, the Black dark-squared bishop is not in position to defend the f6-forking square and 22 ♕xf6+ wins the undefended Black h8-rook.


click for larger view

Note how Keres carefully analyzed the consequences of the <FORCING MOVE> 20 ♘xb6+! to see what weaknesses this move <FORCED> Black to create in his position. This is the beauty of <FORCING MOVES>: they limit your opponent's possible replies. You can then do a detailed analysis of the weaknesses that result from your opponent's -limited- replies to your <FORCING MOVE>.

Mar-13-09  squizz: This is a great example of a sacrifice to keep the opponent's king in the center.
Jun-19-09  beenthere240: 17. a4!! what a way to solve a problem.
Jun-19-09  WhiteRook48: 17 a4 what?...
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