chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing
Jacques Mieses vs Georg Marco
"Marco Solo" (game of the day Oct-03-2009)
Monte Carlo (1903), Monte Carlo MNC, rd 22, Mar-12
Danish Gambit: Accepted (C21)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Get this game explained with Decode Chess
explore this opening
find similar games 17 more J Mieses/G Marco games
sac: 40...Qxg2+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: Premium members can see a list of all games that they have seen recently at their Game History Page.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-03-09  DeltaHawk: FIRST
Oct-03-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: I'll second that!
Oct-03-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <19...Nc7> is another interesting continuation and brings white in some trouble.
Oct-03-09  Primoman: This opening doesnt look too good. White is down 2 pawns with just a small positional advantage. The lack of material just doesn't make it worth it, i usually beat my opponents when they use this on me.
Oct-03-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: <small positional advantage> Really? It's always been my opinion that if you're not prepared for the Danish gambit, it will run over you. Look at the position after 5.Bxb2 and tell me you wouldn't be afraid with the Black pieces!
Oct-03-09  Samagonka: I don't see any spectacular combinations that make this game special apart from a few unusual moves.
Oct-03-09  randomsac: Nasty. Not only is it a knight fork, but the knight will be protecting the rook after getting the queen. Good job of weathering the storm.
Oct-03-09  RandomVisitor: 3 minutes per move:

Jacques Mieses - Georg Marco
[C21]

Monte Carlo (Monaco) It, 1903

[Rybka 3 ]

1.e4 e5 2.d4 exd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Bc4 last book move

4...cxb2 -0.70/16
5.Bxb2 -0.90/15 d6 -0.37/16
[Rybka 3 : 5...Nf6 6.e5 d5 7.exf6 Bb4+ 8.Kf1 dxc4 9.Qxd8+ Kxd8 10.fxg7 Rg8 11.Nc3 Rxg7 12.Nd5 c3 13.Nxc3 Rg6 14.Nd5 Bd6 15.Ne2 Bf5 16.Rd1 Kc8 -0.90/15 ]

6.Nf3 -0.37/16 Nc6= -0.20/16
[Rybka 3 : 6...Be6 7.Bxe6 fxe6 8.Nd4 e5 9.Ne6 Qd7 10.Nxf8 Kxf8 11.Nc3 Nf6 12.f4 Qg4 13.Qxg4 Nxg4 14.fxe5 Nxe5 15.0-0+ Ke8 16.Nb5 Na6 17.Bxe5 dxe5 18.Rac1 Ke7 19.Rf5 Raf8 20.Rxe5+ -0.37/16 ]

7.0-0 -0.22/15 Be6 -0.18/16
8.Bd5 -0.36/17
[Rybka 3 : 8.Bxe6 fxe6 9.Qb3 Qd7 10.Rc1 Nd8 11.Nbd2 c5 12.a4 Nf7 13.Nc4 Ne7 14.Rd1 Nc6= -0.18/16 ]

8...Nf6 -0.36/17
9.Qb3 -0.36/17 Qc8= -0.16/19
[Rybka 3 : 9...Bxd5 10.exd5 Ne5 11.Re1 Be7 12.Nxe5 dxe5 13.Bxe5 0-0 14.Nc3 Rb8 15.Rac1 Bd6 16.Bd4 c5 17.Bxf6 Qxf6 18.Ne4 Qh6 19.Qh3 Qxh3 20.gxh3 Rbd8 21.Nxd6 Rxd6 22.Rxc5 b6 23.Rc7 a5 -0.36/17 ]

10.Ng5 -0.55/17
[Rybka 3 : 10.Re1 Nd8 11.Nc3 Be7 12.Bxe6 fxe6 13.e5 Nd7 14.exd6 cxd6 15.Nd5 exd5 16.Qxd5 Qc5 17.Rxe7+ Kxe7 18.Re1+ Kf8 19.Qe4 Nf7 20.Qe7+ Kg8 21.Qxd7 Qc8 22.Qa4 Qf8 23.h3 a5 -0.16/19 ]

10...Nd8 -0.44/15
11.f4 -0.60/15
[Rybka 3 : 11.Nd2 Be7 12.Nxe6 fxe6 13.Bc4 0-0 14.Rac1 Qd7 15.Rfd1 Rc8 16.Be2 a6 17.a4 c5 18.e5 -0.44/15 ]

11...Be7 -0.60/15
12.Bxe6 -0.83/16
[Rybka 3 : 12.Nd2 0-0 13.Nxe6 fxe6 14.Bc4 c6 15.e5 dxe5 16.Bxe5 b5 17.Bd3 Nf7 18.Rac1 Rd8 19.Qc2 Kh8 20.Bxf6 Bxf6 21.Rf3 -0.60/15 ]

12...fxe6 -0.62/15
13.e5 -1.17/16
[Rybka 3 : 13.Nd2 Qd7 14.f5 e5 15.Rac1 c6 16.Rfd1 h6 -0.62/15 ]

13...Nd5 -0.85/15
14.Qh3 -1.05/17 Bxg5 -1.05/19
15.fxg5 -1.05/18 Nf7 -0.86/16
16.exd6 -1.13/17
[Rybka 3 : 16.Nc3 dxe5 17.Rxf7 Kxf7 18.Qf3+ Nf4 19.g3 Qd7 20.gxf4 Qd4+ 21.Kh1 Rhf8 22.Ba3 e4 23.Qh3 e3 24.Rc1 c5 25.Qxh7 Rh8 26.Qe4 Qxe4+ 27.Nxe4 b6 28.Re1 Rh4 29.Rxe3 Rxf4 30.Bb2 Rd8 31.Be5 -0.86/16 ]

16...0-0 -0.99/16
17.Nd2 -1.52/16
[Rybka 3 : 17.Nc3 cxd6 18.Nxd5 exd5 19.Qg3 Qc7 20.Bd4 Ne5 21.Qh3 Rxf1+ 22.Rxf1 Re8 23.Qb3 Qc4 24.Bxa7 b5 25.Be3 Nd3 26.Qa3 Qe4 -0.99/16 ]

17...cxd6 -1.08/17
18.Ne4 -1.33/18 Qc2 -1.14/17
19.Qxe6 -1.94/16
[Rybka 3 : 19.g6 hxg6 20.Qxe6 Rae8 21.Qxd5 Qxe4 22.Qb3 Qe3+ 23.Qxe3 Rxe3 24.Rfe1 Rfe8 25.Rxe3 Rxe3 26.Kf2 Re7 27.Rd1 b5 28.Rd5 a6 29.Kf3 Re8 30.h3 -1.14/17 ]

19...Rae8 -0.64/19
[Rybka 3 : 19...Nc7 20.Qd7 Rad8 21.Qe7 Rde8 22.Rac1 Qxg2+ 23.Kxg2 Rxe7 24.Rf5 Na6 25.Ng3 Nb4 26.Bd4 Nc6 27.Bb2 g6 28.Rd5 Rfe8 29.Bf6 Re1 30.Rxe1 Rxe1 31.h4 -1.94/16 ]

Oct-03-09  RandomVisitor: continued:

20.Qxd5 -0.90/18 Qxe4 -0.55/17
[Rybka 3 : 20...Qxb2 21.Rab1 Qe5 22.Qxe5 Rxe5 23.Rf4 b6 24.Rbf1 d5 25.Nd6 Re7 26.h4 Rd7 27.Nb5 a6 28.Nd4 Re8 29.Nc6 Nd8 30.Nd4 -0.90/18 ]

21.Qb5 -1.03/16
[Rybka 3 : 21.Qb3 Qe6 22.h4 a6 23.Rf3 Re7 24.Rc1 Qxb3 25.Rxb3 Ne5 -0.55/17 ]

21...a6 -0.83/17
22.Qa5 -1.65/17
[Rybka 3 : 22.Qb3 Qe6 23.Rac1 Qxb3 24.axb3 Re2 25.Ba1 Re3 26.Bc3 -0.83/17 ]

22...Qc2 -1.01/17
[Rybka 3 : 22...Qe3+ 23.Kh1 Qc5 24.Rf5 Qxa5 25.Rxa5 Re2 26.Bd4 Ne5 27.Bxe5 dxe5 28.h3 Rd8 29.Rb1 Rd7 30.Kg1 Rdd2 31.Rxb7 Rxg2+ 32.Kf1 Rdf2+ 33.Ke1 Rxa2 34.Rxa2 Rxa2 35.Re7 Rh2 36.Rxe5 Rxh3 37.Ra5 -1.65/17 ]

23.Rf2 -1.63/18
[Rybka 3 : 23.Bd4 Re2 24.Rf2 Qd3 25.Ba7 Rxf2 26.Bxf2 Ne5 27.Qb6 Nc4 28.Qa7 Nd2 29.Kh1 Ne4 30.Bg1 Qb5 31.Re1 Qb4 -1.01/17 ]

23...Re2 -0.93/20
[Rybka 3 : 23...Qc5 24.Qxc5 dxc5 25.Ba3 Re5 26.h4 Nd6 27.Rd1 Nc4 28.Bc1 Rfe8 29.Rff1 b6 30.Bf4 Re2 31.Rf2 Re1+ 32.Rxe1 Rxe1+ 33.Kh2 Ne5 34.Bxe5 -1.63/18 ]

24.Rxe2 -0.93/19 Qxe2 -0.78/18
25.Qc3 -0.95/21 Ne5 -0.95/20
26.h3 -0.95/18 b5 -0.95/18
27.Rc1 -1.10/18 Qf2+ -1.10/21
28.Kh1 -1.10/18 Qf4 -1.10/19
29.Qc7 -1.10/21 Qxg5 -1.10/19
30.Qxd6 -1.10/20 Nc4 -0.95/19
31.Qd4? -3.29/22
[Rybka 3 : 31.Qe6+ Kh8 32.Qe2 Nxb2 33.Qxb2 a5 34.a3 h6 35.Rd1 Rc8 36.Rf1 Qc5 37.Qb3 Rd8 38.Qb1 Qc4 39.Rf5 b4 40.axb4 axb4 41.Rf3 -0.95/19 ]

31...Rd8 -3.29/21
32.Qc3 -3.21/21 Rd2 -3.21/20
33.Qf3 -3.16/18 Nxb2 -3.16/18
34.Qe4 -3.46/18 Rd8 -3.46/20
35.Qe6+ -4.26/21 Kh8 -3.46/21
36.Rc8 -3.86/21 h6 -3.46/21
37.Qxa6 -3.86/21 b4 -3.46/20
38.Qe6 -4.26/20 Nd3 -3.46/19
39.Rc4? -5.08/16
[Rybka 3 : 39.Rxd8+ Qxd8 40.Qf5 Qd4 41.Qc8+ Kh7 42.Qf5+ Kg8 43.Qc8+ Kf7 44.Qb7+ Kg6 45.Qc6+ Kg5 46.Qb7 h5 47.Qe7+ Kh6 48.Qe6+ g6 49.Qg8 h4 50.Kh2 Qf4+ 51.Kg1 Qe3+ 52.Kh2 -3.46/19 ]

39...Qg3 -5.12/20
40.Rc8 -5.08/19 Qxg2+ -5.08/19
41.Kxg2 -5.12/19 Nf4+ -5.08/18
0-1

Oct-03-09  sfm: <Primoman: This opening doesnt look too good.> There are too good defenses for Black, and so it has disappeared from master practice. But Sneaky is right - and in fact Mieses scored some impressive fast wins, I recall seeing several games in books.

But on this site I could not find any.

Oct-03-09  RandomVisitor: 10.Re1 looks like a good improvement for white.
Oct-03-09  hedgeh0g: I love playing gambit openings, but the Danish is simply too suspect, because at the very least, Black can return a pawn to relieve most of the pressure on his position and continue playing a pawn up.

Also, thematic of 1. e4 gambits is an attack on the f7-pawn. In the Danish, the white dark-squared bishop comes to b2, allowing Black the typical Nh6 defense to cover the sensitive f7 square. In my opinion, the Scotch/Goring gambit is a much more promising opening from the white side as you get similar play as in the Danish, except you only surrender one pawn and the queen's bishop can often prove useful on the c1-h6 diagonal.

Oct-03-09  hedgeh0g: Maybe 8. Bxe6 fxe6 9. Qb3 Qd7 10. Ng5 Nd8 11. f4 would give White some play against the black king stuck in the centre, but I'm sure Black would have a solid defense with careful play.
Oct-03-09  Primoman: True, Sneaky, I guess you could say: big positional advantage. But whenever an opponent uses this on my i'm able to just play defensively and get my pieces developed and like hedgehog said, maybe return a pawn to relieve the pressure. But I'm only a 1600 rating so I don't play the most skilled opponents of course.
Oct-03-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  playground player: Isn't White supposed to make out better than this when Black accepts the Danish Gambit?
Oct-03-09  Eduardo Leon: The one that shouldn't be accepted (at amateur level) is the Smith-Morra gambit:

<1. e4 c5 2. d4 cxd4 3. c3 d3>

Accepting the gambit gives white superior development and probably the disadvantage of not having prepared to face this line. Therefore, transposing to an Alapin gives black better practical chances to set a fight in equal conditions.

Oct-03-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <"In the laboratory, the gambits all test unfavorably, but the old rule wears well that all gambits are sound over the board.">--William Ewart Napier.

In the rarefied world of Rybka and Her Friends, I suspect the Danish and the Smith-Morra are both equally unfavorable for White. In our world, there are no such absolute pronouncements; you must rely on your own skill, judgment, and preferences.

I've seen the Danish many times. I've followed all the rules about breaking White's attack with a timely ...d5. I still get squashed because, once the books give out and I have to play chess, it comes down to the fact that I don't do well on defense.

Many people can do that, and they laugh at the gambits. They'll never convince the rest of us.

Oct-03-09  WhiteRook48: 40...Qxg2+ is a nice forking trick
Oct-03-09  chillowack: Is this another GOTD chosen solely on the basis of the pun? As far as I can tell, there's nothing extraordinary about this game at all: White misplays an already-dubious opening, Black castles to safety, White's down two pawns and scrambling desperately to catch up, then he hangs a piece and makes a fool of himself playing on afterward, until Black finally slaps him in the face with the final combination.

Who's choosing these GOTDs, anyway? Does anyone know?

Oct-03-09  sfm: <RandomVisitor: ...Rybka...> Very interesting indeed. Tried some of the variations, look right to me. White never got near a win, or even an full equalization.
Oct-03-09  RandomVisitor: After the proposed improvement 10.Re1:

1: Jacques Mieses - Georg Marco, Monte Carlo (Monaco) 1903


click for larger view

Analysis by Rybka 3 : <22-ply>

1. = (-0.19): 10...a5 11.Nc3 Be7 12.Bxe6 fxe6 13.Ng5 0-0 14.Qxe6+ Qxe6 15.Nxe6 Rfc8 16.f4 Nd8 17.Nd4 g6 18.Nd5 Nxd5 19.exd5 Bf8 20.f5 c6 21.Re3 Bg7 22.Rf1 Be5 23.fxg6 hxg6 24.Ne6

2. = (-0.06): 10...Nd8 11.Nd4 Be7 12.Bxe6 Nxe6 13.Nf5 Nd7 14.Bxg7 Rg8 15.Bb2 Ndc5 16.Qc2 Qd7 17.Nc3 c6

Oct-03-09  RandomVisitor: "Mieses loses his pieces"
Oct-04-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Pawn and Two: Mieses went to Monte Carlo 1903 well prepared to play the Danish Gambit. He opened 1.e4 in all 13 of his games with white.

Some of his opponents avoided the Danish, and Marco did beat Mieses in this game, but in the following games Mieses scored +4 -1 =1:

Mieses vs Maroczy, 1903; Mieses vs Marshall, 1903; Mieses vs Albin, 1903; Mieses vs Pillsbury, 1903; Mieses vs Reggio, 1903; Mieses vs H Wolf, 1903

In their review of the openings played at Monte Carlo 1903, the "American Chess Weekly" noted: <One of the competitors indulged quite frequently in the Danish Gambit, and he had marked sucess. The game nevertheless is unsound and the defense should win as was admirably demonstrated in the Mieses - Maroczy game.>

NOTE: Create an account today to post replies and access other powerful features which are available only to registered users. Becoming a member is free, anonymous, and takes less than 1 minute! If you already have a username, then simply login login under your username now to join the discussion.

Please observe our posting guidelines:

  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate, or gibberish posts.
  3. No vitriolic or systematic personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No cyberstalking or malicious posting of negative or private information (doxing/doxxing) of members.
  6. No trolling.
  7. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by moderators, create a false impression of consensus or support, or stage conversations, is prohibited.

Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.

Blow the Whistle

See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a moderator.


NOTE: Please keep all discussion on-topic. This forum is for this specific game only. To discuss chess or this site in general, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
All moderator actions taken are ultimately at the sole discretion of the administration.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
nice endding
from 007chess' favorite games by 007chess
Accepted 5...d6 6.Nf3
from C21 Danish Gambit III by listen50s
October 3: Marco Solo
from Game of the Day 2009 by Phony Benoni
Monte Carlo 1903
by suenteus po 147
Other openings
by savya2u

Home | About | Login | Logout | F.A.Q. | Profile | Preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | New Kibitzing | Chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | Privacy Notice | Contact Us

Copyright 2001-2021, Chessgames Services LLC