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Richard Reti vs Jose Raul Capablanca
"A Knight in Capablanca" (game of the day Jul-11-2007)
New York (1924), New York, NY USA, rd 5, Mar-22
English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense. King's Indian Formation (A15)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 7 OF 7 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-08-11  psmith: <qqdos>
I think the judgment "the BQ is lost in 2 or 3 moves and caput" is a bit quick -- I agree that on analysis (and the computers support this) White is winning more quickly in the R1d5 line but it is not just because the BQ is lost -- Alekhine saw that variation but misjudged the position after 26. R1d5 Bxd5 27. g4 Bxf3 28. gxh5 Bxh5 29. Bc6. Looking at that position more closely Black's pieces are poorly co-ordinated and that leads to further catastrophic loss fairly quickly. There are of course situations in which a Rook, minor piece and pawn is not a bad trade for a Queen, but this is not one of them, and the "resulting tussle" is not nearly as prolonged or difficult as Alekhine thought. But although the programs may see this, citing their evals doesn't really illuminate things for the human chess player, as much as actually playing through some lines does.

What I find more interesting is the preference for several other moves over Reti's choice of Nd4. I would say that Reti's move is overwhelmingly natural for a human player, but the tactics seem to favor other moves (and that's where the programs beat us). There seem to be a couple of things going on here.

First, 26. R6d5: After 26.... g5 Black's Queen is still very close to being trapped. But I'd like to know how Houdini (or any other program) proves White to have an advantage (more than a pawn) in this position. I don't see the plan, myself.

Second, why are other Knight moves except 26. Nd4 better? -- against 26. Nd4 Bxg2 27. Kxg2 Rxe3! is a surprising resource pointed out by <qqdos>. Black gives up the exchange for a weakened White Pawn structure and activity for his Queen. I am not sure that White doesn't have a win from this position. But the other Knight moves -- to e1 or h4 -- have the result that after 26...Bxg2 27. N(h4 or e1)xg2 the Knight is covering e3 and the communication between the Rooks on the d-file is not broken, so if 27... Rxe3 is pointless, and White is better.

Jul-08-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sastre: After 26.R1d5 g5, 27.g4 Qg6 28.Rxg6+ wins the Black queen.
Jul-08-11  psmith: <Sastre> The question is what happens after 26. R6d5 (that's Rook on Six to d 5) g5. (26. R6d5 is the second choice of the programs after 26. R1d5).
Jul-08-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sastre: <psmith> Houdini's main line after 26.R6d5 g5 is 27.Ne5 Bxd5 28.g4 Nxe5 29.gxh5 Bxg2 30.Kxg2 Rd7 31.Rxd7 Nfxd7 32.Qd4 (d=22/+2.73).
Jul-08-11  psmith: <sastre>

Thanks. But --

Sorry, I've been stupid.

Of course the question is what about 26. R6d5 Bxd5 27. Rxd5 g5.

Jul-08-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sastre: <psmith> 26.R6d5 Bxd5 27.Rxd5 g5 28.Nh4 f6 29.Bf3 Qf7 30.Nhf5 Qg6 31.Nd6 Re6 32.Rd1 Kh8 33.Bg4 (d=22/+0.90).
Jul-09-11  qqdos: <psmith> Thanks for you thoughtful piece. I was trying to convince you that 26.R1d5!! is a quicker win than 26.Nd4, when Black could struggle on for quite a number of moves. Whether human or machine, after 26.R1d5 I believe Black would resign by move 28. or 29. As a human and with hindsight (!), I think Reti might well concede that he did not play the best move. <Sastre> Thanks also for your contributions.
Jul-09-11  DrMAL: <qqdos> Agreed on all accounts. Nice to see some friendly chess banter rather than some sort of personal trashing. When one examines historical evidence, particularly Alekhine's comment that 26.Nd4 was the "most compelling move" it helps to consider that this game was a huge shocker, everyone at that tournament was completely stunned by Reti's win.

In any event, if you and <psmith> and others want to look at another game I have analyzed, I am most interested on comments regarding Judit Polgar vs Karpov, 2003 cheers.

Jun-09-12  Wyatt Gwyon: What a dirty little pun.
Mar-20-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Reti's score sheet : http://sphotos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphot...
Dec-02-13  erniecohen: I didn't see any followup on the suggestion (from 6 years ago) of 27...♖xe3 28. fxe3 ♘e5}, which seems like it might save the game, e.g. 29. ♕c1 ♘g4 30. ♘f3 ♕xb5.
Apr-08-14  Eduardo Bermudez: Ninety years ago !
Apr-08-14  JimNorCal: <whiteshark>: "Reti's score sheet"

It appears that Reti started to write Alekhine ("Al") and then crossed it out to write "Capablanca".

I guess that even for strong GMs, players on the level of Alekhine, Capa and Lasker all look alike :)

Dec-28-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Reti takes the first serious win from Capa in about a decade.

Richard could have quoted George Costanza from "Seinfeld", when George was lying about designing the Guggenheim addition:

"It really didn't take me that long."

Mar-30-16  DrGridlock: Some discussion above on the merits of 26 R1d5 vs the game continuation of 26 Nd4. Modern engines (as noted in Kingscrusher's video of the game), confirm a preference for R1d5 against Alekhine's notation from 1924:

"White would have won the queen for a rook, knight and a pawn, but the final tussle in that case would have been much more difficult and tedious than after the best defense possible against the move in the text."

Looking at computer analysis after 26 R1d5:

Richard Reti - Jose Raul Capablanca


click for larger view

White's advantage lies on concrete lines, and not just on an abstract idea of how material values compare. After:

26 ... Bxd5
27 g4 Bxf3
28 gxh5 Bxh5
29 Bc6

Richard Reti - Jose Raul Capablanca


click for larger view

Black's pieces are rather tied up, and he has no defense to some further forced exchanges. Komodo likes an exchange sac for black as a way to unlock his knights and rook, but after:

29 ... Rxe3
30 fxe3 Bg4
31 Bxd7 Nxd7

Richard Reti - Jose Raul Capablanca


click for larger view

Black's rook is still stuck on a7, guarding (and blocked by) his knight on d7. Another forced exchange:

32 Qg2 h5
33 h3 Be6
34 Rxe6 fxe6

Richard Reti - Jose Raul Capablanca


click for larger view

Now White's queen is active, and black's pawns are going to start to fall.

35 Qxg6+ Kf8
36 Qxe6

Black has still not found a more active role for his rook than to sit on a7 guarding his knight, and his pawn on h5 is also going to fall after Qf5+ and Qxh5.

R1d5 is simply the better move for White at move 26 because:

(i) White can force exchanges in the following moves

(ii) Black's rook on a7 is inactive with no way to enter the game

(iii) White's queen is quite active and is soon going to start chomping black's pawns.

Mar-30-16  DrGridlock: <erniecohen: I didn't see any followup on the suggestion (from 6 years ago) of 27...♖xe3 28. fxe3 ♘e5}, which seems like it might save the game, e.g. 29. ♕c1 ♘g4 30. ♘f3 ♕xb5.>

Indeed, 27 ... Rxe3 is black's better continuation. Alekhine's notes here are rather silly: "Of course [black] could not play 27 ... Rxe3, on account of 28 fxe3 Qxd1 29 Nf5." Of course black is busted in this position, but Ne5 is a much better continuation for black at move 28 than Qxd1. After 27 ... Rxe3

Richard Reti - Jose Raul Capablanca


click for larger view

Komodo finds:

28 fxe3 Ne5 (not Alekhine's Qxd1)
29 Qe2 Qxe2+
30 Nxe2 Nc4
31 Kf3 Re7

Richard Reti - Jose Raul Capablanca


click for larger view

Here the game is not "saved" for black - White is clearly winning. But there's still "work to be done" for the victory.

May-26-16  edubueno: Having a better position, Capa made a mistake 14...Cf8? instead of 14...d5!
Sep-18-16  edubueno: 30...Txe3! would be done by Dr. Lasker without hesitation.
May-28-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: A nice way to polish Capa off! I didn't notice that trap of the Q. But perhaps Capa was lost already.

Reti played a good Hypermodern game.

Dec-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <End of an Aura>
Dec-24-18  ughaibu: Reticulation of the Python.
Jan-09-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Pyrandus: The Biggest Blunder of Capablanca?
Jan-09-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

The coincidence that here Reti's last move 31.Rd1-d5 and resigns 1-0 was also the same as Reti vs Alekhine, 1924 31.Rd1-d5 and resigns 1-0

31.Rd1-d5 and resigns 1-0 also appeared in Gunsberg vs Burn, 1887 and P F Johner vs Marshall, 1908 ....er....that's it.

***

Jan-09-19  Retireborn: <Geoff> By coincidence I was looking at such a coincidence earlier today:-

Leonhardt vs Marshall, 1911

Stoltz vs Marshall, 1933

Same slightly unusual (5.Qxd3) opening, same Black player, same final move ...Ng3.

Nov-19-19  Eleuthero: The beauty of the final attack by Reti is that it's the epitome of Hypermodernism. All of Reti's pieces which once controlled the center from a distance now directly occupy the center. A beautiful game.
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