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Milan Vidmar vs Akiba Rubinstein
Prague (1908), Prague AUH, rd 16, Jun-08
Queen Pawn Game: Colle System (D04)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-16-05  Whitehat1963: Puzzle after 32. Nxa6.
Jun-16-05  OneBadDog: Was Vidmar playing for a draw in the opening?
Jun-17-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: OneBadDog, probably not--after all, he's already forced Rubinstein to forfeit castling in an open position. After move 8, White looks pretty good to me. Soon his Rooks will harass the Black King, right? It doesn't happen that way, of course.

While Vidmar is able to keep up with Rubinstein in development (unlike Rotlewi in *that* game), Black still somehow gets the extra tempo he needs to put his Rooks in the center first. Both players have a critical Q-side weakness: White at c4, Black at c5. 15...Nb6! is the key move: Rubinstein is the first to hit at the key weakness. 20.Bxf3! is a great follow-up, forcing Vidmar to ruin his King side pawns. When Black finally gets to invade c4, it becomes the prelude to the final attack.

Jun-17-05  OneBadDog: I'm not sure that the inability to castle hurts Black in this position-it may even help him, his king gets closer to the center in an endgame.
Jul-07-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: OneBadDog, I agree with you. However, Vidmar might have thought otherwise.
Jun-22-07  zdigyigy: 10.Be2 seems like such a lifeless move. 10.Bd3,Bb7 11.e4 and go after black's weak dark squares. Any other suggestions for white?
Jul-07-07  Karpova: <zdigyigy: 10.Be2 seems like such a lifeless move. 10.Bd3,Bb7 11.e4 and go after black's weak dark squares.> What about 10.Be2 Nbd7 instead and after 11.e4 e5 white's bishop is hemmed in while black still does have a comfortable position (just like in the game).

The inability to castle wasn't a disadvantage for black after the queens were gone and black's pieces well-placed. In the end, the centered black king turned out to be much stronger than his white colleague who had to waste several tempi to get back into play.

These two black knights were truly terrible fellows!

Nov-27-07  Karpova: After 12...Nbd7


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Donaldson/Minev: <This game is an excellent illustration of Rubinstein's contributions to modern chess strategy. Today it is common knowledge among GMs that with this type of queenside pawn structure, possession of the c-file is more important than that of the d-file. In part, this is because of the potential outposts on c4 or c5. Here the possibility of ...Nd7-b6-c4 gives Black the chances.>

Source: Akiba Rubinstein - Uncrowned King, p. 149.

May-11-17  Count von Twothree: The decisive error was 22.Na4. Vidmar had to try 22.Rxd7+ Nfxd7 23.Rc1 Nc4 24.Bxc4 instead, with decent drawing chances.
Oct-21-17  Count von Twothree: Also Rubinstein's execution was inaccurate. 24...Rc1+ 25.Rd1 Rc2 should have been met by 26.Rb1, which is a tougher defence than the 26Nd3 of the game. Rubinstein could have played 24...Rc3 instead, which would have been a much cleaner kill.
Oct-21-17  JimNorCal: Is this really a Colle Opening?

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