chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing
Kenneth Regan vs Leonid Alexandrovich Shamkovich
4th World Open (1976), New York, NY USA, Jul-??
Pirc Defense: Kholmov System (B07)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 56 times; par: 32 [what's this?]

Get this game explained with Decode Chess
explore this opening
find similar games 2 more K Regan/L Shamkovich games
sac: 8...Bxg4 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: As you play through the game, you can get the FEN code for any position by right-clicking on the board and choosing "Copy Position (EPD)". Copy and paste the FEN into a post to display a diagram.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
Mar-04-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: 7.Bb5!, as in a later game between these two players, wins. White threatens 8.g4, and 7...dxe5 is met by 8.d5! a6 9.dxc6 axb5 10.cxb7 Bxb7 11.Qxb5+, winning a bishop.
Jun-14-09  Eisenheim: isnt 18 ...qb4 deadly here, esp if followed by an eventual ...d5. sequestering thewhite queen and threatening mate
Sep-20-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  KWRegan: FSR, right you are! Now for an odd story. Both games occurred in the last round of big CCA Swisses when we were contending for prizes. In the present game, in 1976, I accidentally pocketed Shamkovich's glasses, since they were like my own. Poor man couldn't find them the whole game, and it was a combination of him being too polite to ask/accuse me, and of me just being clueless. However, it didn't hurt his sight of the board any, as he improvised the sacrifice and played a wonderful attack after my 7.g4(?). At the end my mother found the extra glasses in my bag---and my mortification was only tempered by the fact that we did give Shamkovich a ride home that night.

In the return game (November 1978) he had his glasses on...but he simply /forgot/ he had been shown the refutation 7.Bb5 by a GM friend! It had also been published in a magazine---which I didn't know; I had found it myself that night after we dropped Shamkovich home in 1976. I think I won in 18 moves---gracious as always he did the post-mortem with me and that's when he remembered. Incidentally 7.Bb5 is also the correct reply to 6...Ng4, when 7...O-O 8.Bxc6 bxc6 9.h3 Nh6 10.Nf3 is unclear.

Feb-24-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: There are superior alternatives to 6....Nh5; while the line 6....Nxd4 7.exf6 Nxe2 8.fxg7 Rg8 9.Ngxe2 Rg7 is considered equal and I played several games with it against 2300+ players, I wouldn't care to repeat it-White's game is easier to play, in my opinion.

The idea 6....Ng4 7.e6 Nxd4 8.Qxg4 Nxc2+ 9.Kf1 is complex and probably doesn't offer White much against careful defence. 6....Nd7 is a solid move I tried against the young Patrick Wolff.

Dec-09-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <KWRegan> Thanks! Very belatedly noticed your comment just now.

NOTE: Create an account today to post replies and access other powerful features which are available only to registered users. Becoming a member is free, anonymous, and takes less than 1 minute! If you already have a username, then simply login login under your username now to join the discussion.

Please observe our posting guidelines:

  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate, or gibberish posts.
  3. No vitriolic or systematic personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No cyberstalking or malicious posting of negative or private information (doxing/doxxing) of members.
  6. No trolling.
  7. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by moderators, create a false impression of consensus or support, or stage conversations, is prohibited.

Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.

Blow the Whistle

See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a moderator.


NOTE: Please keep all discussion on-topic. This forum is for this specific game only. To discuss chess or this site in general, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
All moderator actions taken are ultimately at the sole discretion of the administration.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

<This page contains Editor Notes. Click here to read them.>

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
48
from 200 Modern Brilliancies (Wicker) by Chessdreamer
48 of 200 Modern Brilliancies (1984) by Kevin Wicker
from Fredthebear labeled 125 Minis & 300 Destruktors by fredthebear
Outposter's favorite games
by Outposter
23 moves
from Chess Miniatures, Collection XII by wwall
23 moves
from Chess Miniatures, Collection XII by PinkLedDoor
had2x's favorite games
by had2x
48
from 200 Modern Brilliancies (Wicker) by fredthebear

Home | About | Login | Logout | F.A.Q. | Profile | Preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | New Kibitzing | Chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | Privacy Notice | Contact Us

Copyright 2001-2020, Chessgames Services LLC