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Boris Spassky vs Joop van Oosterom
Wch U20 final-A (1955), Antwerp BEL, rd 4, Aug-01
King's Indian Defense: Saemisch. Orthodox Variation (E85)  ·  1-0

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Kibitzer's Corner
Sep-19-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: <chessgames.com>I just looked up Boris Spassky's 300 wins and the game score of this game is the same as one in the book. The opponent ,however, is not Jon van der Wiel but Joop van Osterom the now famous chess patron. Can you check if this is correct.
Jun-17-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Mateo: Demolition man destroyed White's Kingside in a brilliant way. The sac of the Knight opened the road to the heavy pieces. The beautiful point is that in many variations, White plays some seemingly slow moves, but he has all the time he needs since Black cannot move.

17. Nf5!! gxf5 18. Qh5+ Kg8 19. gxf5 <the threat is 20.Qh7 Kf7 21.Rg1 Rg8 22.Bh6> Rf7 <19...Qe8 20.Qh7 Kf7 21.Rg1 Rg8 22.Bh6 Qf8 23.Be2 wins with the idea 24.f4 and 25.Bh5> 20. Be2 <coming: 21.Rdg1 and 22.Qh8> Nc5 <20...Kf8 21.Rdg1 (with the threat 22.Qh8) Qe8 22.Qh7! and 23.Rg7 wins. For instance, 23...Nb5 24.Rg7! Rg7 25.Bh6 Qf7 26.Rg1> 21. Rdg1 Qd7 <21...Kf8 22.Qh8!> 22. Qh8# 1-0

Oct-02-09  kooley782: This is one of the most brilliant Spassky wins I've ever seen. Beautiful how he locks the center and then attacks the kingside, one of the unblocked areas of the board. Finally, after opening the file, Spassky unleashes a series of sacs that lead to demolition of black's king position. A delight!
Oct-02-09  ughaibu: For Saemisch kings indians, try this one: Spassky vs Larry Evans, 1962
May-27-11  ycpl: How can white break through if 14... g5?
May-28-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <ycpl> White's hands are freed on the kingside, though he can no longer attack there, so he simply rearranges his pieces and uses his spatial advantage on the other side of the board, after neutralising any attacking chances against his own king.
Feb-20-14  Zonszein: Correct. After 15-h6 and 16-Nf5 black bishop is locked like forever. Spassky and Fischer are the best players of all time
Feb-21-14  RookFile: You almost get the feeling that black was surprised by the final Qh8 mate here. Resigning was a better move.
Feb-21-14  Zonszein: <Benzol: I just looked up Boris Spassky's 300 wins and the game score of this game is the same as one in the book. The opponent ,however, is not Jon van der Wiel but Joop van Osterom the now famous chess patron. Can you check if this is correct.> GM Victor Korchnoi confirmes it in his brilliant book "Chess Is My Life"
Apr-01-15  A.T PhoneHome: 17.Nf5 is a great sacrifice! After that, 18.Qh5+ means Black King has to return to g-file and h-life, 18.Kg8, then just 19.gf5 and 20.Be2 to let the second Rook occupy g-file. 21.Rdg1 and 22.Qh8# for swift finish.

After 16.Qh2 you could feel it in the air; Spassky wins!

Nov-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: I read in one of John Nunn's books that "Botvinnik, Petrosian, Karpov and Kramnik" had all played the Samisch Variation as White. Which is four World Champions - but what about Spassky? I felt certain I'd seen some great wins by Boris in this line ... and here we are! Magnificent.
Nov-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: 17.Nf5! is beautiful, but it needs to be seen earlier for full effect -- and certainly before 16.Qh2.
Nov-06-15  sudoplatov: Nf5 in the Kings Indian (and similar formations) is termed the "Benoni Jump" by Knoch in "Pawn Power in Chess." It's a thematic sacrifice sort of like Bxh7 or Bxh2 against a Castled King. The Benoni Jump does several things; it opens the g-file (rarely the e-file); it removes part of the Pawn wall; if not accepted, the Knight can remove the Bishop at g7 further weaking the position.

Spassky's version here is in the midst of other happenings. (Kmoch also calls the ripping open of the h-file against a Kingside Fianchetto, the "King George Attack."

Nov-06-15  Olavi: Is it really Benoni jump? In the original German it's "Enteropfer".
Nov-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Dom> The prospect of facing the Saemisch is almost definitely the reason why Fischer did not venture it in his first match with Spassky.

The best-known win for the former champion is likely Spassky vs Larry Evans, 1962, an orgy of pawn sacrifices to satiate even adherents of that style.

Nov-07-15  ToTheDeath: Yes a superb game by Spassky, but very one sided. Na7? was questionable among other moves.

This Yugoslav attack style of playing against the KID was popular for a time until antidotes were found. I recall Spassky making an unsound Nf5 sac against Fischer in one of the last games of their 1992 match and getting throughly crushed. You can't go home again.

Nov-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <perf> Yes, the Spassky-Evans game was uppermost in my mind. In the 1980s I had a chess engine for the Apple Mac, produced by Psion Chess. It was quite advanced for its time, with a playing strength somewhere around 1800-2000. I could beat it, but I needed to concentrate. It also featured 50 master games, one of which was Spassky-Evans.
Nov-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Olavi: Is it really Benoni jump?>

Kmoch coined a great deal of jargon in <Pawn Power>, little of which caught on, if any.

Nov-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: Spassky really is one of the greats -- something that Fischer recognized, but not everyone does now. As far as I recall, Spassky and Anand are the only players to lose a first world title match, only to regroup and subsequently win the title. Which says something about determination and perseverance, not just brilliance.
Nov-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Dom> For all the talk bruited about that, by the mid sixties, based on retrospective grading, Fischer was numero uno, Spassky played: for long stretches, Fischer did not, though particularly after his 1968-69 layoff, he came back stronger than ever.

Long ago, I recall Spassky likening his own character to that of a bear, in that it took much to rouse him, but that once he had got there, watch out.

Spassky's results in world title events from 1964-69 compare favourably with those of Smyslov, under discussion now elsewhere, a decade earlier. The man could play a little, and to comprehensively outplay the formidable Korchnoi as he did in the 1968 candidates final was most impressive.

Nov-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <perf> Very true. Indeed, Spassky shut Korchnoi out of the title match level for several years. It was only when Spassky had beaten Petrosian, then lost to Fischer and Karpov, that Korchnoi got to compete at that level. And even then there was that weird Belgrade match between the two -- where Boris wore an eyeshade and analysed on the display board -- and where Korchnoi built up a huge lead only to lose 4 or 5 games in succession. One of the strangest and most dramatic matches ever ... it even featured some French Defences. Didn't Keene say something about Spassky being a "Marxist leprechaun"?
Nov-08-15  Lt.Surena: perfidious: <Dom> by the mid sixties, based on retrospective grading, Fischer was numero uno,

"retrospective", meaning Pure Horse Hockey !

Only in his mind. Bobby Lost (got spanked) 7 times/games earlier in 1963 Curacao and still cried like a baby.

20 odd years later in 1992, Bobby also "retrospectively" claimed he was still world champ. But we all know he was too chicken to face Kasparov, Karpov, etc.

Oct-31-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Domdaniel: Very true. Indeed, Spassky shut Korchnoi out of the title match level for several years. It was only when Spassky had beaten Petrosian, then lost to Fischer and Karpov, that Korchnoi got to compete at that level. And even then there was that weird Belgrade match between the two -- where Boris wore an eyeshade and analysed on the display board -- and where Korchnoi built up a huge lead only to lose 4 or 5 games in succession. One of the strangest and most dramatic matches ever ... it even featured some French Defences. Didn't Keene say something about Spassky being a "Marxist leprechaun"?>

I remember that match vividly, too. Korchi had a 5:0 lead and lost four games in a row. Korchnoi - Spassky Candidates Final (1977)

Oct-31-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Hi Perfidious,

"The prospect of facing the Saemisch is almost definitely the reason why Fischer did not venture it in his first match with Spassky."

The prep was not wasted. Raymond Keene was the first to play a KID v Spassky after the '72 match.

Spassky vs Keene, 1973

May-17-18  Toribio3: Castling on the opposite sides: Spassky demonstrated his expertise in penetrating the hostile king as past as he can!
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