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Eugene Aleksandrovich Znosko-Borovsky vs Georg Salwe
"The Grass is Salwe's Greener" (game of the day Jan-09-2017)
St. Petersburg (1909), St. Petersburg RUE, rd 4, Feb-19
Formation: Queen Pawn Game: London System (D02)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Annotations by Emanuel Lasker.      [80 more games annotated by Lasker]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: <mistreaver> A pun is a play on words, usually clever and hopefully funny. Here the stock phrase "The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence" becomes a pun by using the player's name. Sometimes these jokes backfire after learning the correct pronunciation in their native language, like Euwe and Pirc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pun

Jan-15-08  mistreaver: <tpstar> thanks
Jan-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: This match left me perplexed. I stared at the board after 34 Bd1 and said why not simply 34 e4? That appears to completely stop black's attack.


click for larger view

And 38 Rc1? is indefensible. It immediately loses a piece by 38... Qb2 39 Be2 Qxe2. 38 Ra2 again stops black from gaining additional material. Black keeps just a slim one-pawn advantage.


click for larger view

Jan-15-08  Chessmensch: <UdayanOwen> That's because of the live games.
Jan-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: It seemed like white had a fixation for pawn moves. The problem with this idea is that pawn advances lead to weaknesses such as holes. Black was able to focus his pieces deep in white territory and the necessary pawn defenses were nowhere to be found.
Jan-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajk68: <Jimfromprovidence> My only guess is that e4 was seen to create too many weakness in white's pawn structure. Black's knight will certainly become dominant in one of the holes. If white trades the dark squared bishop for the knight, then he suffers a bad bishop and a dark square weakness. At some point, black could demolish the kingside pawns with a raging attack.
Jan-15-08  zb2cr: <Jimfromprovidence>, re: your suggestion of 34. e4. This really reduces White's light-squared Bishop to impotence. Remember that Black is already up a Pawn; Black could just play 34. ... a4 and make sure White's now-bad Bishop stays locked up forever.
Jan-15-08  D.Observer: White surrendered <because a ♖ <will be captured> and <there's no way to guard it>.>
Jan-16-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: <zb2cr> <re: your suggestion of 34. e4. This really reduces White's light-squared Bishop to impotence. Remember that Black is already up a Pawn; Black could just play 34. ... a4 and make sure White's now-bad Bishop stays locked up forever.>

Not really. If black plays 34...a5 (not a4) white simply plays 35 b4!


click for larger view

Now, if white captures the pawn at b4 white will follow with 36 Bb3, pinning black's queen. The queens must be exchanged and white's bishop is freed.

If black does not capture white's b pawn then he loses his a pawn.

Jan-16-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: A correction to my last post.

Now, if <BLACK> captures the pawn at b4 white will follow with 36 Bb3, pinning black's queen. The queens must be exchanged and white's bishop is freed.

Jan-09-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: "The Grass is Salwe's Greener" is today's game title. To which you could add "Znosko Green as Cabbage".
Jan-09-17  FairyPromotion: The PGN source should be edited. Black's 5th move is written as <6.Nf6> instead of just <Nf6>.
Jan-09-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: < UdayanOwen: Possibly the least kibitzing interest ever for a game of the day? I don't know, haven't been at CG long, but certainly its the least interest I've seen in that time by far.>

Not even close, really, although at the time of your post it was tied with this one:

Chandler vs O I Barkan, 1975 (kibitz #3)

Jan-09-17  JimNorCal: At 5. "Such a narrowing move" is awkward. A more natural translation might be a "limiting" move, in the sense of a move that limits the possibilities available to the white position.
Jan-09-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gregor Samsa Mendel: <zb2cr> and <Jimfromprovidence>--If 34 e4, maybe black should play 34..Bf7 prior to advancing the pawn to a5; this renders the threat of b4 followed by Bb3 harmless. He can then maneuver his knight over to d5, as Lasker mentions in his notes, maintaining a superior position to go with his extra pawn. It's true that white would have had better chances with this line than the one played in the actual game.
Jan-09-17  ChessHigherCat: <JimNorCal: At 5. "Such a narrowing move" is awkward. A more natural translation might be a "limiting" move, in the sense of a move that limits the possibilities available to the white position> It's probably an overly literal translation of Lasker's "so ein einengender Zug" (eng = narrow). Was the translation suggested by his wife, Alice Lasker? I don't know, al ask'er.
Jan-09-17  AlicesKnight: Even after 38.Ra2 (instead of the error Rc1) White's position approaches catalepsy.....
Jan-09-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: What a pun. What a monstrous bloody pun. Worst (ie best) for yonks.

Salwe dance?

As they say in Alaska: "It's good to smoke the green, green grass of Nome".

Jan-09-17  Cheapo by the Dozen: Znosko-Borowsky played that like a smart beginner.
Jan-09-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: <Cheapo>

I hope you do understand that your statement says more about you than about Znosko..

Jan-09-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: Lemme give some... improvements:

-5. Be2
-9. dc5
-13. Ne5
-17. b3
-18. Qc2
-19. Qc2
-20. Rcd1
-21. f3
-22. Bc2
-25. Bc7=
-28. b4=
-29. Bc2=
-30. f4=
-31. f4=
-33... Nd5
-34. e4
-34... Nd5

Jan-09-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  johnlspouge: < <Lasker> wrote: 25. Bg3 After 25.Bxg7 Black would win by 25...e5 >

I thought 25...Qg5 was better, and Stockfish agreed with me (by more than 0.5 P)!

It must be true about the chimpanzees on a typewriter...

Jan-10-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: In hindsight Lasker's statements are pretty hilarious. Therefore I only gave improvements for White (except the decisive Nd5 moves for Black). It's interesting what Lasker thinks of White's 5th move. 5. Be2 Qb6 is simply met by 6. Nc3
Jan-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: White loses because the pawns block his own pieces.
Jan-16-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <ChessHigherCat> - < I don't know, al ask'er.>

Ouch.
"Canada come out to play?"
"Alaska."

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