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Paul Troeger vs Georg Hodakowsky
FRG-ch (1957), Bad Neuenahr FRG, rd 6, Oct-17
Indian Game: Kingside Fianchetto (A48)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Apr-26-05  Granite: <Madman99X: a puzzle shouldn't have three different winning lines, should it?>

Endgame puzzles can sometimes have several winning moves, since you have several interesting queening tactics and the king is a unique piece and so on. I mean if it's clear that a king can march back to take the opponents pawn does it matter which route he takes all the time? :)

Apr-26-05  RookFile: Yes, my plan was 1. Rxd5
followed by b6. There
appear to be a half a
dozen way to win. Somebody
pointed out that if he
simply plays 1. f4, white
retains all of his previous
options, and further stymies
black.

Not like black can do anything.

Apr-26-05  TastyWaste: I had 42 Rxd5 exd5 43 Ne7+ Kxg5 44 Nxd5. Seemed cleaner to me...
Apr-26-05  RookFile: The puzzle gets more silly the more
you think about it. White could
play 1. f4 Kg7 2. Kf1 Ne3+ 3. Ke2
Nxd1 4. Kxd1 Kf8 5. Nxa7 and still
win easily.
Apr-26-05  YouRang: I came up with same same line as <TastyWaste>. The N should then be able to easily escort a pawn to promotion, yielding an even easier win in the long run (even though less "elegant"). So, I am going to give myself credit for 'getting this one', unless someone points out the flaw in that approach.
Apr-26-05  artemis: I saw this one quickly, mostly because I have played many similar endgame positions.

A good puzzle should have only one solution, if you are working on calculation. Allowing a puzzle to have multiple answers does not give anyone much practice unless they are able to identify all winning lines, which most people dont. The endgame puzzles, however, rely on the tactic of queening, which allows many different variations. Most of these variations cannot be achieved without the same or similar theme, however.

Also, Chessgames only has real games to deal with, so there are many excellent options here, like a real game of chess as <marvol> noted.

Apr-26-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I saw both sacs,but couldn't imagine using both!

Two pawns on the sixth cannot beat a rook if one can be captured immediately-the third pawn prevents Ra6---so it is a win for white:

THREAT:
46a6 ♖xb6 47 a7 ♖a7 loses the rook

Apr-26-05  aw1988: I got this one quite easily; I guess the theme is rook sacs.
Apr-26-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: < aw1988: ... I guess the theme is rook sacs.> Promotions is my guess.
Apr-26-05  aw1988: Yeah, I missed that obvious bit- or perhaps the two combined?
Apr-26-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <aw1988: ... perhaps the two combined?> Could be; 2/2 is a perfect track reccord.:-)
Apr-26-05  aw1988: <Gypsy> Fun avatar, by the way. :-)
Apr-26-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <aw1988> Thanks, this rook is not as brooding as the one I had.

Btw, do you know who is on your avatar -- Wallenstein perhaps? (In which case you also have switched between two wolves. :-))

Apr-26-05  aw1988: <Gypsy> Shakespeare.
Apr-26-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  beenthere240: I thought this was a great puzzle. It would be a great way to win the game as opposed to the <RookFile> solution which is about as satisfying as a single french fry. The proposed soution is a Whopper.
Apr-26-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Today's puzzle solution 42. Rxd5! followed up by 43. Nxa7! is a neat Queening combination, illustrating the power of two connected passed pawns on the sixth rank supported by a third pawn on the fifth rank in overpowering a lone Rook. Note that 42. Nxa7! Rxa7 43. Rxd5! transposes to the game solution.

Apr-26-05  RookFile: I originally came up with Rxd5 and b6 ( yes, I know, different than the game.) The point is, there are lots of ways to win, provided white shows
even the slightest amount of due diligence. My current preference is for TastyWaste's 1. Rxd5 exd5 2. Ne7+
and Nxd5. Spin the tomorrow and I may prefer 1. Nxa7 instead.
Apr-26-05  Ezzy: White missed a stunning demolition job with his knights!! 33.Ne7+ Kh8 34.Nxf7+ Rxf7 <(34...Kh7 35.Ng5+ Kh6 36.Nxe6 Qe4 <(36...Ne4 37.Qc6 Qd6 38.Nxf8 Threat is 39 Nxf5 mate 38...Bxf8 39.Nxf5+)> 37.Nxf5+ Kh7 <(37...Kg6 38.Ne7+ Kh7 39.Ng5+)> 38.Qxa7 Ne8 39.Nfxg7)> 35.Ng6+ Winning.
Apr-26-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <ezzy> I had a brief look at that just now as I was playing the game through...

I saw everything in this puzzle - or this "challenge" see below)

<only one solution> no! - well these are positions from games and they have a degree of ambiguity and is some cses we may find refutations -the idea I think is to simulate an actual game - that is why I dont move pieces around (except 'mentally') - I try to work the solution out without a computer or whatever...that, to move the pieces around on a board or use a computer - seems pointless -people talking about Fritz etc - the idea I feel si to try workting the position out as if you were at the board about to play a move - and inevitablly -as in real (or OTB) chess - there are going to be ambiguities - I'm certain that Bronstein didn't need Rxd5 to win the other day b4 was a winner also. But it was great game.

Dear My Bretheren and my Sisteren - the point is to learn or enjoy whether or not you (or anyone) 'solve' the puzzle...I like these puzzles - or these "challenges" - I dont always get the 'solution' but usually have some of or most of the ideas -sometimes I draw a blank but I always learn from the game and /or at least enjoy it...

I have spoken.

Apr-26-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <ezzy> yes! I saw the start of that but was hurrying thru to see the outcome..very good -well spotted!
Apr-26-05  tjraczko: I've got to weigh in on the side of <Marvol> and <artemis>. Perhaps another way to look at these problems, is as "Tactics Training" rather than as tactics puzzles. Interesting technique in this problem with the three pawns vs. rook, I hadn't seen or thought about this situation before.
Apr-28-05  The beginner: This puzzle is somewhat similar to the puzzle we had on monday.

Its harder to see the first two moves.

42 Rxd5 ..exd5
43 Nxa7 ..Rxa7

And black cant stop the promotion of a pawn.

However again we end with a endgame wich is not so easy, at least not for me. In theory and of course for stronger players Queen vs rook might be easy. But if black is able to pull out his best move every time, the game still has a long way to go, before white can secure the victory

The continuation

45 b5 ..Kxg5
46 a6 ..Rxb6
47 a7 ..Rxb5
48 a8Q ..Rb1+

Rook + 4 pawns vs Queen and 2 pawns.

White has the win, but how to secure it is another story. I think with corect play from black it is at least 20ish moves before white win. A small mistake from white, and the table can easely turn to a draw :)

Anyone want to show a winning continuation here ?

Apr-28-05  Everett: I think I got an answer as to why not 14...Nxd5. In my above post, I analyzed

<15.Nxh5 gxh5 16.Qe4, threatening mate at h7, and the knight on d5. 16...Nf6 17.Qxh8 and black can't trap the queen.

If black declines with 15...Nb4 then white has 16.Nxb7 Nxd3 17.Qxd3 Kxg7 leaving black weak on the dark squares.>

Apr-28-05  Everett: But after I put Hiarcs to the test, it came out with 15...Bh8 16.Be4 Nc3! with an unclear position, at least in my eyes, which aren't too good...

Still, interesting position.

Apr-28-05  Everett: And perhaps, after 15...Bh8 the simple 16.Ng3 is best, preparing h5, attacking along the h-file. Black still has Nc3, but even the resultant winning of the exchange after 16...Bb7 17.h5 Nc3 18.bxc3 Bxc3+ 19.Bd2 Bxa1 20.hxg6 white has some attacking prospects.
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