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Konstantin N Aseev vs Dennis de Vreugt
European Championship (2001), Ohrid MKD, rd 4, Jun-04
Benko Gambit: Accepted. Fully Accepted Variation (A58)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-04-10  sfm: You need to be a pretty cool counter not to screw up one tempo in 68.RxB+!!,KxR
69.e5,exd
70.exd,Kf6
71.Kd4,Ke6
72.Kc5,d4

For this reason today's was hard, while the last two in last week could be found in a few seconds, with nothing to calculate.

Feb-04-10  SolaGracia: Somehow, I got this one very quickly, seeing that by removing the bishop with the rook black could not stop white's pawns. But I did not see up to the threat of stalemate @ gxf5.
Feb-04-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  OBIT: My apologies for posting a comment very similar to one I made on page 1, but after 68. e5 Bf4! is a much better defensive try than 68...Be7, mainly because it forces the exchange of a second set of pawns. After 68...Be7 69. de fe 70. Ke4 White is already on his way to penetrating the Black position -- now 70...d5+ lets White keep the e-pawn, making the win that much easier, while 70...Bf8 71. Rh8 Be7 72. Re8 wins quickly.

In contrast, 68. e5 Bf4 69. de fe 70. Ke4? is obviously not possible because of 70...Bxe5, so White must play 70. ed Bxd6. True, the Nalimov tablebase tells us this is also a win, but the decisive maneuver is much more complicated. For starters, this position is drawn if the bishop can get to the a1-h8 diagonal. After 71. Ke4 however, the bishop can't get to this diagonal, so Black's best chance is Plan B: keep the pawn on e6 and the bishop on the b1-h2 diagonal. Playing through the database, it looks like White then achieves the win by maneuvering the rook and king to get the pawn to advance to g5. Once the pawn gets to g5, White then penetrates with his king on the h-file. For example, 71...Bg3 72. Kf3 Bd6 73. Ra5 Bb8 74. Ra8 Be5 75. Ra6! (the only winning move) Kf6 76. Ra5 Bc3 77. g5+! and wins in another 30 moves by forcing his king up the h-file. (On move 77, the best rook moves add 19 moves to the finish.) In this line, another maneuver to get the pawn to g5 can occur after 74...Bc7 75. Rc8 Bh2 76. Re8 Kf6 77. Rh8 (gaining a key tempo by hitting the bishop -- maybe this position would be drawn if the board were one file wider) Be5 78. Rh6+ f7 79. g5.

It's definitely a gnarly win. I think it's safe to say 68. Rxg5+ is more efficient. :)

Feb-04-10  cyclon: Personally I like this one very much. 68.Rxg5+ (68.e5 gives "chances") -Kxg5 69.e5 exd5 ( -dxe5 70.d6 Kf6 71.g5+, wins) 71.exd6 Kf6 72.Kd4 Ke6 73.Kc5 d4 ( -Kd7 74.Kxd5, wins) 74.Kc6 d3 75.d7 Ke7 76.Kc7, White wins.
Feb-04-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: I have to show this line and hope someone sees it. I decided to nudge Fritz along with his 68. Rh8 idea and see what he was getting at. I centaured out this amazing position:

68. Rh8 Kf6 69. Rg8 Bh4 70. g5+! Bxg5 71. e5+ dxe5 72. d6


click for larger view

Only 9 plies in, but I would never have seen it. Unbelievable.

Feb-04-10  SamAtoms1980: For what it's worth, my favorite line:

68 Rxg5+ Kxg5
69 e5 exd5
70 exd6 Kf6
71 Kd4 Ke6
72 Kc5 Kd7
73 Kxd5 f6
74 Kc5 <Ke8>
75 Kc6 Kd8
76 d7 f5
77 <g5!> f4
78 <Kd6!> f3
79 g6 f2
80 g7 f1=Q
81 g8=R+


click for larger view

Feb-04-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: Great line <Sam> !
Feb-04-10  YouRang: <OBIT: My apologies for posting a comment very similar to one I made on page 1, but after 68. e5 Bf4! is a much better defensive try ... 68. e5 Bf4 69. de fe 70. Ke4? is obviously not possible because of 70...Bxe5, so White must play 70. ed Bxd6.>

Why can't black play 69.Ke4 right away? If 69...dxe5 (guarding the bishop), then 70.d6!

Feb-04-10  YouRang: <SamAtoms1980: For what it's worth, my favorite line:

68 Rxg5+ Kxg5 69 e5 exd5 70 exd6 Kf6 71 Kd4 Ke6 72 Kc5 Kd7 73 Kxd5 f6 74 Kc5 <Ke8> 75 Kc6 Kd8 76 d7 f5 77 <g5!> f4 78 <Kd6!> f3 79 g6 f2 80 g7 f1=Q 81 g8=R+ >

Note that with that line, white could still play 77.gxf5 and win.

A similar variant that I looked at earlier goes:

74.Kc5 <Kd8>
75.Kc6 Kc8
76.d7+ Kd8
77.Kd6 f5

Now, gxf5 is stalemate. So...

78.<g5!> f4
79.g6 f3
80.g7 f2
81.g8=R#

Feb-04-10  desiobu: e5 is an important technique to remember. Often times you can create a passer by offering a pawn.
Feb-04-10  njchess: I liked this puzzle. It was simple, yet diabolical. The salient point is that Black cannot win since he cannot capture without exchanging material.

I found Rxg5+ and e5 pretty quickly. Ultimately, I discarded e5 for the former because it is not as forcing since it allows Black's bishop some play e.g. 68. e5 Bf4 (68. ... Be7? 69. Rh8! and Black has problems protecting his f-pawn, his bishop and the d8 square).

Rxg5+ is attractive not only because it forces Black's immediate move but it also places Black's king far away from the real action on the d-file. This lets White win the foot race.

I also found amusing Black's last ditch attempt at a draw. After more than three hours of play, it wasn't a bad idea. White thinks he has a won game and takes the pawn and poof! It's a draw.

I also found OhioChessFan's line of Rh8, but discarded it after 68. Rh8 Kg7. Black can then play Kf6 and Ke7 and Bf4, if necessary. In this line, White will attack Black's weak d-pawn with his king and use his rook to drive off Black's king and/or exchange with Black's bishop. It takes longer, but White still wins.

Feb-04-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  benveniste: I love the position after 69. e5! All 3 of whites remaining pawns are en prise, and black is still helpless.
Feb-04-10  micartouse: This is one of these problems where there's no way I'd see it in a game. But since it's a puzzle, it's easy to solve.
Feb-04-10  David2009: <OBIT: ... after 68. e5 Bf4! is a much better defensive try than 68...Be7, mainly because it forces the exchange of a second set of pawns. After 68...Be7 69. de fe 70. Ke4 White is already on his way to penetrating the Black position -- now 70...d5+ lets White keep the e-pawn, making the win that much easier> Yes - in fact Crafty does play d5 but the win is there <while 70...Bf8 71. Rh8 Be7 72. Re8 wins quickly. In contrast, 68. e5 Bf4 69. de fe 70. Ke4? is obviously not possible because of 70...Bxe5, so White must play 70. ed Bxd6 [snip] this position is drawn if the bishop can get to the a1-h8 diagonal. After 71. Ke4 however, the bishop can't get to this diagonal so Black's best chance is Plan B: keep the pawn on e6 and the bishop on the b1-h2 diagonal. >

Thank you for some extremely perceptive comments, in particular your refutation of Be7. I tend to put too much trust in Crafty for finding the right move: in fact it can make strategic mistakes.

The typical drawn position (with either side to play) is


click for larger view

Black has constructed an impregnable fortress,

Feb-04-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: Nobody's yet talked about the losing move for black. I'm thinking if he plays e6 back on move 63, he can draw.


click for larger view

If white follows with 64 Rh1, then 64...Bd4 shuts off the king.


click for larger view

Feb-04-10  lightbishop c5e6: Whew, finally got it, 68. Rxg5+! Kxg5 69. e5!! liquidates into an winning endgame for white.
Feb-04-10  randomsac: Creating a passed pawn with e5 gives black all sorts of trouble once the bishop dies.
Feb-04-10  TheaN: <YouRang: A similar variant that I looked at earlier goes:

74.Kc5 <Kd8> 75.Kc6 Kc8 76.d7+ Kd8 77.Kd6 f5 Now, gxf5 is stalemate. So... 78.<g5!> f4 79.g6 f3 80.g7 f2 81.g8=R#>

Nice line Rang, but it was listed by quite some others earlier (including myself), and, it's the game line up to 78.g5 where Black resigned :).

Feb-04-10  turbo231: I didn't get Monday's or Tuesday's puzzle, but I got wednesday's and Thursday's! Splain that.
Feb-04-10  Eduardo Leon: 68.♖xg5+ ♔xg5 69.e5!!

If 69...dxe5? 70.d6, the pawn becomes unstoppable.

69...exd5 70.exd6 ♔f6 71.♔d4 ♔e6 72.♔c5 d4

Of course, if 72...♔d7 73.♔xd5.

73.♔c6!

The black ♙d4 one tempo too far from the first rank, as will be seen.

73...d3 74.d7 ♔e7

Because the white pawn has arrived first.

75.♔c7

Feb-04-10  YouRang: <TheaN> Right you are! I got so caught up in analyzing various attempts for black that I ignored the line actually played, lol.
Feb-04-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  OBIT: <YouRang:> You're right that after 68. e5 Bf4 69. Ke4 dxe5 (or 69...Be5 70. Rxe5 dxe5 71. d6 f5+ 72. Kxe5 Kf7 73. g5 and wins) 70. d6 wins, although some of the lines after 70...f5+ are pretty hairy. Here I'd have to say the most rational continuation is 71. Kf3! fxg4 72. Kxg4 Kf7 73. Rh8 and wins. If White wants to get theatrical, however, it appears another way to win is 71. gxf5!!? Kxh5 72. f6! (not 72. fxe6? Kg6 and draws after 73. e7 Kf7 or 73. d7 Bg5) and Black can't stop both pawns.

So, apparently Black is best off not taking this pawn and should play 69...Bg3. Now I don't see any way for White to make progress except to trade off the pawns by 70. exd6 Bxd6 71. dxe6 fxe6. This reaches the key position from my previous comment, except the White king is on e4 instead of d3. So, since the first move when the king is on d3 is Ke4, you'd figure this 69. Ke4 line, getting the king to e4 right away, ought to win faster. Well, except it doesn't - according to the tablebase, the position with the king on e4 is a 45 move win, while the position with the king on d3 is a 39 move win. Hmm, how's this possible? Evidently the Black bishop is well posted on Bd6 and would rather not move off this square, so it is better for Black to have White on move. Since White walked into this situation with 69. Ke4, I guess we have to call 69. Ke4 dubious, heh heh...

Feb-04-10  suplexer: yes!! i am suprised i saw the whole combo including up to last move g5 which queens with checkmate. It is seems it is easier to calculate in endgames, as i can not see nine moves ahead in middlegame.
Feb-04-10  TheBish: K Aseev vs De Vreugt, 2001

White to play (68.?) "Medium"

My first candidate move, 68. e5 fails to either 68...Be7 or 68...Bf4. I then moved on to the exchange sac, but didn't think it worked at first, because I didn't correctly analyze the K+P endgame. If at first you don't succeed, try try again!

68. Rxg5+!! Kxg5 69. e5!

Of course, this has to be analyzed correctly before you get this far!

A) 69...dxe5 70. d6 Kf6 71. Ke4! is zugzwang and the d-pawn queens in two moves.

B) 69...exd5 70. exd6 Kf6 71. Kd4 Ke6 72. Kc5!

This is the move I missed first time around.

72...d4

Of course, 72...Kd7 73. Kxd5 is elementary, my dear Watson!

73. Kc6! d3 74. d7 Ke7

Or 74...d2 75. d8=Q.

75. Kc7 d2 76. d8=Q+ and wins.

Feb-05-10  YouRang: <OBIT> <...after 68. e5 Bf4 69. Ke4> <So, apparently Black is best off not taking this pawn and should play 69...Bg3. Now I don't see any way for White to make progress except to trade off the pawns by 70. exd6 Bxd6 71. dxe6 fxe6... >

In this line, after <69...Bg3> [diagram]


click for larger view

Here, white can resurrect the rook sac idea: <70.Kf3!> putting the question to the bishop.

If <70...Bxe5> then 71.Rxe5 dxe5 72.d6!, which is essentially the same predicament black faced in the 78...Kxg5 line.

If <70...Be1> then white runs: 71.exd5 exd5 72.d7 Ba5 73.Rxd5

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