chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing
Moises A Kupferstich vs Harry Andreasen
"Chasing Windmills" (game of the day Oct-28-2005)
Club Tournament (1953), Copenhagen DEN, Jan-12
Bishop's Opening: Blanel Gambit (C27)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 22 times; par: 42 [what's this?]

Get this game explained with Decode Chess
explore this opening
find similar games 14 more games of M Kupferstich
sac: 21.Rxc7 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can display posts in reverse order, by registering a free account then visiting your preferences page and checking the option "Display newest kibitzes on top."

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 1 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-03-02  pferd: An amusing finish. You see, of course, why Black resigned.
Dec-03-02  ughaibu: Presumably Nd6 and queen the pawns.
Dec-03-02
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: It reminds me slightly the game Alexander Petrov vs P Journoud, 1863 :-)
Dec-03-02  pferd: Queening a pawn is harder than it looks because if Black exhausts himself of Pawn moves, he can then sac his Bishop for the queening pawn and he is stalemate!

White ignores the Bishop and the Black e and g pawns (except to play pxp when they get to e3 and g3). He moves his King along Black squares to e7. He then plays Ne4 or Ne8 followed by Nf6#

The only difficulty is if the Bishop is sitting on c6 or g6 when it comes time to play Ne4 or Ne8. In that case, White plays his a pawn forward, draining Black of his (at most) three pawn moves, after which Black is in zugzwang.

Neat, eh?

Dec-03-02  drukenknight: gee and you thought my theories were tortured.
Aug-18-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: A quiet mate is in the offing:first white moves his king on the black squares to e7. Then he mates on f6--or vice versa.
Feb-07-04  SEVEN: Chessgames.com
This game here reminds me another one so exciting that I think it deserves to be in your database. It goes like this
Gusev-Averbakh 1-0
Sicilian Dragon
Moscow 1951

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be2 Bg7 7.Nb3 Bg7 8.O-O Be6 9.f4 Rc8 10.f5 Bd7 11.g4 Ne5 12.g5 Ng8 13.Nd5 f6 14.Be3 b6 15.Nd4 Kf7 16.c3 Qe8 17.Ne6 Bxe6 18.fe6+ Kf8 19.Nxf6+ Nxf6 20.gf6 Bxf6 21.Bh6+ Kg8 22.Rxf6 ef6 23.Qxd6 Rc6 24.Qxe5 fe5 at this point white has a winning potition and he has just two bishops for a Queen and a Rook. 25.Rf1 Rc8 26.Bd1 Rc4 27.Bb3 b5 28.Bxc4 bc4 29.b3 a5 30.bc4 a4 31.Kg2 a3 32.Rf2 Qe7 33.Rf1 g5 34.Rf5 g4 35.c5 Qd8 36.c6 Qe7 37.c7 Black resignes

Feb-07-04  ughaibu: SEVEN: Go to the front page, at the bottom you'll find the upload facility.
Feb-09-05  prinsallan: Seven, I was just wondering:
6. Be2 Bg7
7. Nb3 Bg7
Seems you found a nice way of avoiding Zug Zwang...
Moving a piece to the same position ^^
Feb-16-05  SEVEN: Princallan: You are rigth.
The correct moves are 6.Be2 Bg7 7. Nb3 Nc6.
About the Zug Zwang theme, the truth is that I have done this once, in time pressute, and finally I won.
Apr-01-05  aw1988: Good lord, what a crazy game, full of interpositions, windmills and other assorted nasties.
Apr-21-05  avidfan: This game is very instructive.
It shows the true aim of the game (checkmate at all cost), the value and capability of the pieces. The endgame shows how powerless the light squared bishop is in not being able to control e7 and f6 against the knight delivering the final blow. The pitiful rook locked up at h8 shows how useless it is in depriving the king of a flight square and the need for piece development. The dark squared White bishop has a stranglehold of two squares around the king while keeping the pawn at h7 from freeing the rook. Move 21 shows the advantage in seizing the seventh rank. The windmill tactic (see-saw check) occurs at move 29 to 32. Probably Black lost the game at move 20 when Bc6 would have prevented the seizure of the seventh rank.
Aug-29-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: This game is fully annotated in Irving Chernev's book "The Most Instructive Games Of Chess Ever Played."
Oct-28-05  makaveli52: wow, just wow, what a great game, and a unique finish
Oct-28-05  Kola: I love this position. I feel like buying it. . . .
Oct-28-05  cade: The final position is stunning! The white King and his pawns will beat the poor black Bishop while his King and Rook are stuck helplessly in the corner.
Oct-28-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: Amazing game. So *this* is why Black has to enter the Frankenstein-Dracula Variation.
Oct-28-05  bachiller: Remember wednesday┬┤s game of the day. There is a beautiful symmetry: There, black queen was condamned to prison in a8, whereas today it is the king who cannot escape the gaol in h8. Both games are wonderful.
Oct-28-05  spock jenkins: hi folks! longtime visitor, but i almost never kibitz. i feel, as a beginner, that i can't add much of value. no cool lines or anything like that.

however, since this game features a nice windmill, i thought it would be ok to direct folks to what i think is a cool game, containing a windmill, that i uploaded to the database recently. if you're interested...

K Volke vs M Schaefer, 1994

i'd like to add that i really appreciate the wealth of knowledge all the kibitzers bring here, and to thank chessgames.com for their truly excellent site!

Oct-28-05  Norman Glaides: So what happens after 8.g4?
Oct-28-05  drmariogodrob: <Norman> After 8. g4, black plays the same move: 8. ... Nh6.
Oct-28-05  YouRang: Fascinating game. The bishop and knight have black's king and rook in a hopeless dungeon, awaiting execution. As Kevin86 points out, the final position is <mate in 10> (if I counted right), and yet, simple to solve.
Oct-28-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I saw the windmill idea and I thought we had sneaked from Germany (zugzwang) into Holland (windmills). The ending doesn't exactly fit the zugzwang theme-it goes along better with such games as the "tomb game"-which appeared recently,I believe.
Oct-28-05  underrated: <pferd: An amusing finish. You see, of course, why Black resigned.>

no acturally i dont, please do tell

Oct-28-05  aragorn69: As has already been pointed out by various kibbitzers, the winning strategy is not to promote the pawns (Black's bishop is sacrificed to provoke stalemate), but to lead the King to e7 in a roundabout way (i.e. through d2-c3-b4-c5-b6-c7-d8) and then play Ne8 or Ne4 (u may need a waiting move to force the bishop out of c6/g6) and then Nf6 mates.
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 1 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>

NOTE: Create an account today to post replies and access other powerful features which are available only to registered users. Becoming a member is free, anonymous, and takes less than 1 minute! If you already have a username, then simply login login under your username now to join the discussion.

Please observe our posting guidelines:

  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate, or gibberish posts.
  3. No vitriolic or systematic personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No cyberstalking or malicious posting of negative or private information (doxing/doxxing) of members.
  6. No trolling.
  7. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by moderators, create a false impression of consensus or support, or stage conversations, is prohibited.

Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.

Blow the Whistle

See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a moderator.


NOTE: Please keep all discussion on-topic. This forum is for this specific game only. To discuss chess or this site in general, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
All moderator actions taken are ultimately at the sole discretion of the administration.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

<This page contains Editor Notes. Click here to read them.>

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
helpless windmill
from the "well played" collection by thesonicvision
Bishop's Opening: Blanel Gambit (C27) 1-0 Truely Fascinating!!
from Leearn Checkmates on the 3rd/6th Outer File by trh6upsz
Game 19
from Instructive Games (Chernev) by inmaniac
Moises Kupferstich
from ! Miscellaneous games by Qindarka
eat eat eat!
from Counterpoint's favorite games by Counterpoint
see-saw, BN mate
from Basic Endings Compiled by avidfan 100 Best Books by fredthebear
The See-Saw Check, Zugzwang, and Other Tactical Tricks, R Trap
from Fredthebear Met the New Kid In Town by fredthebear
JohnO.O's favorite games part 2
by JohnO.O
"The See-Saw Check, Zugzwang, and Other Tactical Tricks"
from Chernev's "The Most Instructive Games of Chess" by lia0630
The See-Saw Check, Zugzwang, and Other Tactical Tricks!!!!!!!!!
from Game of the Days by hidude
The See-Saw Check, Zugzwang, and Other Tactical Tricks
from Instructive Games of Chess by Chernev by takchess
windmill - knight and bishop prison
from Tactics: windmill by Baby Hawk
Game 19
from Instructive Games (Chernev) by Jersey Joe
The See-Saw Check, Zugzwang, and Other Tactical Tricks
from The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played by agb2002
windmill knight and bish prison
from LordGlorfindel's favorite games by LordGlorfindel
Attack on f7,"The See-Saw check"
from Brutal Attacking Chess by JoseTigranTalFischer
see-saw,BN mate
from Basic Endings Compiled by avidfan by wtpy

Home | About | Login | Logout | F.A.Q. | Profile | Preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | New Kibitzing | Chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | Privacy Notice | Contact Us

Copyright 2001-2021, Chessgames Services LLC