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Daniel Freeman vs Laufer
"What a Long Strange Trip it's Been" (game of the day Dec-10-2017)
Ana Capri (1993), Ft. Lauderdale, FL USA, rd 2, Nov-26
Gruenfeld Defense: Exchange. Spassky Variation (D87)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-11-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <Domdaniel> Once John was grateful for your birthday wiahes, and has asked me to say "thanks" on his behalf.

The birthday paradox has always been a favourite of mine. Most people get confused between the odds of everyone having the same birthday as me, with the odds of at least two people in the group having the same birthday as each other.

This is how I explain it (asuming there are 23 people in the room):

The odds of someone having the same birthday as person #1 are 22/365 - in other words, each person in the room has a 1 in 365 chance of matching person 1's birthday, multiplied by the 22 people in the room (other than person 1, natch).

The odds of someone having the same birthday as person #2 are 21/365. The same odds as before, minus the chance of matching person #1, cos we've already tested that. Add those odds to the chance of matching person 1.

So it's not too hard to see that the odds of finding any matches are 22+21+20+19 ..., all divided by 365. And all that lot looks like roughly half to me.

Just don't get started me on the Monty Hall problem...

Dec-11-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  SwitchingQuylthulg: <Once: So it's not too hard to see that the odds of finding any matches are 22+21+20+19 ..., all divided by 365. And all that lot looks like roughly half to me.>

And the probability of finding matching birthdays in a group of 27 people is (27+26+25+24...+2+1)/365 ~ 1.036, or roughly 104%.

Dec-12-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: White's king rolls out of the pocket and is able to proect himself-black's is under the gun,with nowhere to go.
Mar-29-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Nightsurfer: Hola Daniel, FELICITATIONES belatedly! A great King's Walk, that King's Walk of yours - and, with colours reversed, a stunning replay of the rather cocky foray by White General deep into the Black camp 91 years ago and way across the Atlantic Ocean over there in rainy Scotland, back then a courageous attack that had been executed by Richard Teichmann versus Allies at Glasgow 1902, please check out the match here at Chessgames.com by surfing to the link www dot chessgames com slash perl slash chessgame ? gid=1250612 , an amazing case of DEJA-VU. My compliments, Daniel!
Apr-11-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Nightsurfer: There is the missing direct link to >>R Teichmann vs Allies<<, check out and enjoy: Teichmann vs Allies, 1902 !
Mar-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Once: ... This is how I explain it (asuming there are 23 people in the room):

The odds of someone having the same birthday as person #1 are 22/365 - in other words, each person in the room has a 1 in 365 chance of matching person 1's birthday, multiplied by the 22 people in the room (other than person 1, natch).

The odds of someone having the same birthday as person #2 are 21/365. The same odds as before, minus the chance of matching person #1, cos we've already tested that. Add those odds to the chance of matching person 1.

So it's not too hard to see that the odds of finding any matches are 22+21+20+19 ..., all divided by 365. And all that lot looks like roughly half to me.>

As <SwitchingQuylthulg> so drolly indicated, your math doesn't work. The triangular number that is the sum of the integers 1 through 22 is (1+22)/2 x 22, i.e. 253. http://wiki.answers.com/Q/A_list_of... 253/365 is about .693, decidedly more than half.

The correct way to figure it out (leaving aside the matter of Leap Day, and the fact that birthdays are not quite evenly distributed) is: when you have two random people in a room, the odds of them <not> having the same birthday are 364/365. If they don't, and a third person comes in, the odds of him not having the same birthday as either of the other two are 363/365. The odds of there not being a single matching birthday, with 23 people in the room, are the product of the first 22 such numbers, i.e. <364/365 x 363/365 x 362/365 x 361/365 x 360/365 x 359/365 x 358/365 x 357/365 x 356/365 x 355/365 x 354/365 x 353/365 x 352/365 x 351/365 x 350/365 x 349/365 x 348/365 x 347/365 x 346/365 x 345/365 x 344/365 x 343/365>. Paste that into Google, without the angle brackets (yes, Google also works as a calculator) and you'll find that it equals .49270276567. That is the odds of there <not> being a single match. The odds of there being at least one match are one minus .49270276567, i.e. 0.507297234. Leaving it at six decimal places, that's 50.7297%, as Wikipedia says. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birthd...

Mar-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Cool finish. But I'm surprised that Laufer of all people would be so eager to surrender his dark-squared bishop (laufer in German) just to win a lousy pawn.
Jul-06-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <FSR> Might be that Laufer was tired of the old saw, 'He who has the bishops has the future'.

That said, Black's decision to part with his dark-squared Laufer could only have been justified by concrete considerations on a par with victory, for the consequences are only too obvious--he gives up thirty-two squares.

Dec-10-17  gauer: Happy sweet sixteen, chessgames!
Dec-10-17  Cheapo by the Dozen: Nicely done!

And somewhere there should be a game that deserves captioning with "Laufer is all you need".

Dec-10-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: Good game! Black should have done something with his N and B so the onboard computer recommends 19. ... Bc4 when it is difficult for White.

Better by White might have been 19. d5 which is about = I think.

But Black, missing Bc4, got punished for grabbing pawns and neglecting King safety.

A good game by White indeed.

Dec-10-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: The probability of two birthdays happening in the same room or day time with 23 people milling around is x multiplied by the birthday cake and divided by the exponent of the number of years and candles. Beer can be used to throw over anyone in the room. Then people are all advised to walk backwards in semi-circles muttering to themselves. Salt is also thrown at intervals during the process. Icing is then consumed by the MC... Sealing wax is then pressed on to a special mold. Cabbage is also used. If a King can be found he is asked to dance a foxtrot around the house in question. Spells and more chants are chanted. Nothing, though, should be left to chance.

Then we invoke a magical book and find that it is 3 quarters of a hocum pocum wokkum probablness that the birthdays will coincidate. This is to an accuracy of one 'double trouble'.

I was told all this by an expert in working these things out. It is very clear and very useful.

Dec-10-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <Richard> You, mon ami, are a Pataphysician.
Dec-10-17  Keyser Soze: Happy birthday CG`s.! And well played here.:p
Dec-10-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: Happy 2^4, CG and Dr Freeman. What, no actual doctorate? Never mind - in my capacity as Vice-Chancellor for Vice in the Invisible College (aka La Musee Imaginaire aka BLIP: Bunratty & Limerick Institute of Pataphysics) I hereby award you a PhD in Rock'n'Roll and Statistical Diplomacy.

Your parchment can be picked up in any laundromat or diplomat.

CG 16th is particularly significant as 16 is a 4th power, the square of a square (and the next one is 81, some way off). A chessboard is also, in a sense, a square of a square.

Dec-10-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  chessgames.com: Thanks everybody for your support and birthday wishes. You people are really what this is all about.

<Where is my mind: To the next 8 years cheers!> I've been waiting 8 years to answer that post. Thank you, and here's to 8 more years still!

Dec-10-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: As an old German chess saying goes, "Ach Scheisse, Ich habe mein Laufer Verloren!"
Dec-10-17  lost in space: Ach, heer doch uff! De Läufer iss wech!
Dec-10-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  fm avari viraf: Congrats! May God Shower His Divine Blessings Upon You & Chessgames.com.
Dec-10-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: Happy Birthday !

With many more to come.

Dec-10-17  Boomie: Keep on Truckin', CG.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPQ...

Dec-13-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <Domdaniel: <Richard> You, mon ami, are a Pataphysician.> I keep looking that up and keep forgetting what it means...perhaps I am a frustrated 'physician' if not a metaphysician...
Dec-13-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <lost in space: Ach, heer doch uff! De Läufer iss wech!>

Mein Gott, I vill playen youren zilly gammen...

I was aware that Laufer was B. I have seen players from Europe using Ls and other symbols for B and so on. The knight is S for Springer I think.

My name Taylor in German really is Schneider I think. Although the names are not the same.

It is good that <chessgames.com> are still going strong!

Apr-29-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: Here is a large, informative chart (scroll half way down) showing all the worldly chess piece names and symbols in various languages...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algeb...

There is much diversity!

Apr-29-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: Daniel Freeman, Co-founder of chessgames.com!

(born Sep-30-1967, died Jul-24-2018, 50 years old) United States of America

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