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Vladimir Kramnik vs Garry Kasparov
"Gazza's Tears" (game of the day Nov-26-2016)
Kasparov - Kramnik Classical World Championship Match (2000), London ENG, rd 10, Oct-24
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Normal Variation. Bernstein Defense Except Gligoric System (E53)  ·  1-0

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 9 OF 9 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-09-15  EhsanBalani: I don't really understand why Garry played 14...Cf6 instead of 14...Ff6?
Oct-24-15  Sularus: <Besheer> White threatens QxR. After Kg8, white has Ne6 which threatens both QxR++ and Qxg7++.
Nov-26-15  st.dvy: Like any student of chess history, I admire Garry Kasparov for many, many reasons. I do, however believe that Kramnik has, somehow, managed to be held in less regard than any world champion. One statement that Kasparov made in an interview following the match will resonate for me forever, "I never thought he'd be so negative." Negative? Gary Kasparov is often regarded as the greatest attacking player of all time. Kramnik worked as his second for a while. Why should Kramnik play into Gary's strengths? Kramnik ressurected the Berlin Defense in the Ruy Lopez which Kasparov could not crack! One of the greatest Lopez players ever couldn't beat his second's archaic opening choice. Now the Berlin is still causing so much trouble for white at the highest levels, that many 1.e4 players are actually switching, and it's all thanks to what Kramnik accomplished in this match. There were only two wins in this match, both by Kramnik, with white, and he was very sharp... not negative, but sharp. After Gary's comments, I devoted an entire method of play devoted to eliminating the opponents choices and giving him what he'd least like to see, from both sides of the board. I call it 'Negachess'. Thanks Vlad!
Nov-27-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  andrewjsacks: 1. The match was not a full 24 games.
2. Kramnik was always a "difficult opponent" for Kasparov. 3. Kramnik should have agreed to a return match regardless of official bodies' stipulations, etc. 4. I contend Kramnik's resultant bad karma haunts him to this day.
Nov-29-15  st.dvy: Well... I'm sure that neither you nor I could say anything reasonable concerning Kramnik's emotional state or karma. 'Haunted' is such a strange idea is all of this. Kramnik won the title and continues to play. On a personal note, I was rooting for Gazza then and still do. Kasparov is to chess like G.W. Carver is to science: one of the most important figures ever! Kramnik has nothing to be ashamed of, he won the title without a single loss; while his contributions in The Berlin Defense still resonate. Give the player his due, right?
Dec-16-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <1. The match was not a full 24 games. > No, but it was longer than the quickfire world matches we've seen since.
Nov-26-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Cricket going very badly. England won the toss but have slumped to 53-3.
Nov-26-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: I don't understand the pun.
Nov-26-16  JimmyRockHound: There was an English footballer called Paul Gascoigne, who was nicknamed Gaza, and he quite regularly burst into tears.
Nov-26-16  cunctatorg: At this emblematic WCC match the chess world had two (or three) losses and just one gain: we lost the greater, perhaps, chess World Champion and we also lost one of the greatest chess players ever, namely Vladimir Kramnik; after this great match (where he had lost weight of 20 Kg!...) Vladimir Kramnik was never again the same great chess player... We also lost Kasparov's determination , attacking creativity and inventiveness and we gained instead a great variation, the "Berlin Wall"...
Nov-26-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <JimmyRockHound> Thank you for that explanation. Now, how is the game title a 'play-on-word' much less an actual pun? Was the match played on a soccer pitch? Did Kasparov dribble a soccer ball around while Kramnik pondered his next move? Was Gascoigne an honorary judge for the match? In the event of a tie, would the match be decided by free kicks?

Whats the connection?

Nov-26-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <Gazza's Tears> Sounds painful.
Nov-26-16  moodini: <JimmyRockHound ...and he quite regularly burst into tears.>

This normally refers to the World Cup semi-final in 1990 against West Germany. Gazza got a yellow card and burst into tears when he realised that it meant he would miss the final due to suspension. In the end England lost on penalties and then everybody cried (apart from the West Germans who seemed reasonably pleased).

Nov-26-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: <Gascoigne > I thought that's a French waiter?
Nov-26-16  Cheapo by the Dozen: Kasparov should have played on two more moves, in the hope that Kramnik somehow would pick the wrong plan for the endgame.

Still, it's very unlikely that that would have worked out for him.

Nov-26-16  devere: 15...fxe6 looks like the fatal error. On 15...Rc7 Black has enough counter-play for the pawn.


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Nov-26-16  Robyn Hode: Kramnik will be remembered as the player who avoided a rematch with Kasparov--as Alekhine did vs Capablanca. But Kramnik will never be confused with Alekhine.
Nov-26-16  Kamagong42: yep! even though Kasparov failed to crack the Berlin due to his stubbornness, i believe he can regain his WCC title if the rematch happened, Kasparov was still at his prime then
Nov-26-16  devere: <Robyn Hode: Kramnik will be remembered as the player who avoided a rematch with Kasparov--as Alekhine did vs Capablanca.>

Kramnik's story on that matter is quite convincing to me.

http://chess-news.ru/en/node/4521

Nov-26-16  The Kings Domain: Kasparov played poorly in the match. A game like this would have been unthinkable in his prime. It's not so much Kramnik won the championship, it's that Kasparov lost it.
Nov-27-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  sycophante: <st.dvy: Now the Berlin is still causing so much trouble for white at the highest levels, that many 1.e4 players are actually switching...> For instance?
Could someone give a few examples of players who effectively stopped playing e4 because of the Berlin? I hear this from time to time but am curious to know if this is true.
Dec-13-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: 14..Nxf6 was criticized by many but it is interesting to note that there are 3 games in the database with 14 Bxf6 played since this game and in 2 of them 14..Nxf6 was played. Analysis after the game focused on 15..Rc7 16 Ng5..Qxd4 as an improvement for Black; in 3 games played since this game 16..Bd6 has been played with 2 draws and 1 White win. Kramnik could have played 18 Qxd8..Rcxd8 19 gxf..Rxd4 and he estimated he would have had a 50% chance of winning this ending but thought that he would have an even better chance in the middlegame. 19..Qf4 had been played in Hazai-Danielsen Valby 1994 (White won); 19..Qxb2? was new (Kasparov was not familiar with the earlier game) but left him with a practically lost position. One suggestion for an improvement was 19..Qd2 20 Rxc8..Rxc8 21 Nd6..Rb8 22 Ne8..Rb7 23 Qe5..Ng8 with realistic chances to defend.
Jun-25-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  jith1207: Are you guys for real? Why should a newly crowned world champion go for a rematch, just because the opponent wants? Your mad love and bias for Gary is ludicrous.
Jul-07-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Clement Fraud: <DrMAL> <I'm quite sure Kasparov prepared this opening with usual meticulous care, but seemingly forgot to play the intermediate move 13...a5. After 13...a5 14.a3 Be7 the exchange sequence starting with 15.Bxf6 is no longer favorable for white. Here, white's best is 15.Nb5 or 15.Be3 with basically equal chances.>

I love to learn new things, and was intrigued by your comment from 2011 about the idea of 13...a5 for black; it took me quite some time to figure out the reasoning behind this move. After lengthy analysis of my own, I find myself wondering if (following) 13...a5 14.a3 Be7 white can still play 15.Bxf6 (!??) - because if 15...Nxf6 16.Bxe6 a4 17.Qa2 the same set of tactics are available to white as in the game!? Or am I missing something (please)?

Jul-07-20  Olavi: < Clement Fraud: DrMAL> <I'm quite sure Kasparov prepared this opening with usual meticulous care, but seemingly forgot to play the intermediate move 13...a5. >

I think it is extremely unlikely either player considered a move like 13...a5. The positional ugliness of the move, with or without 14.a3, is enough; white can simply continue quietly and the b6 pawn will hurt black's mind.

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