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Tatiana Kosintseva vs Leonid Yurtaev
4th Stage Russian Cup (2002), Samara RUS, rd 4, Jul-29
Philidor Defense: Alapin-Blackburne Gambit (C41)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Sep-25-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Black gets an initiative that lasts the entire game with this seldom played gambit in the Philidor. I'm convinced that the gambit is sound and that with a little home analysis, black-side Philidor players can catch a lot of strong players by surprise with it.
Sep-25-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: With 52...c4, black uses his pawn majority to crack open white's defenses, setting up two consecutive pins to first create and then queen a passed pawn.
Nov-01-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  nasmichael: Yurtaev makes good use of initiative to keep White from making the responses she expected. Black makes solid propositions in the end that White is not able to answer.
Nov-03-04  aw1988: Doubtful that it makes a good opening choice, <patzer2>. I'm not all that strong and every time I play against it my opponent gets crushed.
Mar-13-05  soberknight: I don't understand 14 Ne3. Doesn't 14 Be3 make more sense?
Mar-13-05  elbowkey: To soberknight: If 14 Be3, 14...Qxf5 wins a piece.
Mar-13-05  aw1988: I think 14. Be3 Bxe3 15. Qxe3 Nd5 and if 16. Nxd5 then Qxd5.
Mar-13-05  aw1988: Gah! 14. Be3 Qxf5. I am blind.
Jun-06-05  lopium: I think white could have won, but lost his little material advantage and his position got bad.
Jul-06-09  newzild: 4...Nd7 5.exd6 Bxd6 is called the Duke of Brunswick Gambit and is considered dubious, although this game clearly demonstrates that white must be careful. 8...Bxe2 is somewhat unusual in this line, but works out well in this case.

In terms of possible improvements for white, the sequence 13.Qf2 and 14.Ne3 looks inferior - it would have been better to put the bishop on e3 or the knight on d4, away from the line of fire of black's Q and R battery.

32.Ne2 was also dubious. White should have played 32.b3. This would have restricted the mobility of the black knight and helped to safeguard white's q-side pawns, which later proved weak.

42.Rd2? was probably the decisive mistake. 42.Re1 looks better, when white has good drawing chances.

Jan-07-10  tibone: If I remember correctly stefan buecker has dealt with this gambit in his book on the englund gambit and recommended 6.Be2 with advantage for white. but i don´t remember the lines he gives as a proof.
Jul-05-21  magic1949: 7.Nc3!? better 7 Nd4
7? Qe7?! Much better is 7?0-0
After Nd4 a better try for black is 8....Be5 9.Bxg4 Nxg4 10.Nd5 Qh4 11.g3 Qh3 12.Nf4 Bxf4 13.Bxf4 Qg2 14.Qf3 Qxf3 15.Nxf3 O-O-O 16.Nd2 Nge5 After 9?.0-0 (probably best) 10. f3 white has a solid advantage. If 14.Be3, then the suggested Qxf5?? loses the Black queen because the Bishop on e3 breaks the pin. 14 Nd4 hitting back at Black?s queen was better
14?Nb6?! the knight should go via f8, to g6
15?Rad8 ! this would have been a better choice on the previous move, now Nc4 was the thematic follow up to Nb6 Unpinning with 16. Qh4 or 16.Qg3 were more promising moves. I prefer 18?..c6 to orotect d5 rather than g6

20?Bxc3 and 21,,,Nh4 looks a sensible option
21. Nc5 is tempting but throws away most of the advantage Bg5 or a4 pose more questions to Black - after Qe7 Black has the move Qh4 in the air and White?s kingside starts to look vulnerable meanwhile Bxc3 is still on and White has to keep defending the knight on c5 ?Black can even play Nf4 22?.Be5 is dangerous and White then has to play g4 22?Rxd1? hands the advantage back to White 23?.f5!? not as good as it seems at first sight White can ignore it and play e.g. a4 or Kg1 better was 23?Nf4 25 g3?? Throwing away much of White?s significant advantage by giving Black a target to attack, better was Qf2 overprotecting c5. 28?Rf8? Much better was Bd6
29.e5! is even better.
32 Kg2 its now level, better was f4 or Rf1
34 a4 is better
35 Qc3 makes life more difficult than it need be. 38?.b4!? Not best but sets some traps e.g
a. 39.Qc5 Qf4 40.Kg2 Rd2+ 41.Re2 Rxe2+ 42.Nxe2 Qxf3+ 43.Kg1 Qxe4 44.Ng3 Qe1+ 45.Kg2 Qd2+ 46.Kf1 Qf4+ 47.Qf2 or b, 39.Qb3+ Kg7 40.Re2 Rd1 41.Rg2 Qf4 42.Rg3 h5 43.Qe6 g5 44.Rg2 Nxf3 45.Qe7+ Kg6 46.Qe8+ Qf7 47.Qxf7+ Both favour black. 39 Qe1 as played is =

40?Qf3? This allows White to play Rd2 challenge the occupation of the open file -or exchange rooks- White is still a pawn ahead - which was not possible with the Queen at g5 simply Rd7 was good 40.,,.Rd1?! this works because Black blunders, but g5 was stronger. White should play 41. Re1!
41. Rd2?? After the game move 41?.Qxf3 Black is clearly winning 44?.c4 is the fastest way to victory.

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