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Pontus Carlsson vs Graham K Burgess
European Club Cup (2002), Halkidiki GRE, rd 6, Sep-27
Alekhine Defense: Exchange Variation (B03)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-11-17  gofer: Well, I got <129 Kc6 Rc1+ 130 Kb6 Rb1! 131 Bb2! ...> but then I got a little stuck. There are five rook moves to look at and it tunrs out that the <131 ... Kb8> is the best defence! At that point, I even started to question whether my original premis was wrong, that <129 ... Rh6+> was unplayable... ...so I gave up.

I see that I was right that <129 Kc6> is a win in 19 moves, but that's a little tricky for a <Friday>!!!

http://www.k4it.de/index.php?lang=e...

I just didn't see this position arising 10 moves in...


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...silly me!

Aug-11-17  gofer: <Walter Glattke>: <The Nalimov Table Bases> make everything crystal clear...

<stacase>: "131. ...Kb8 follwed by 132. Be5+ loses the Rook."

Well, it does, but probably not in the way you meant. The rook cannot be taken immediately due to stalemate threats so the correct move is not <132 Be5+>, but <132 Kc6!>, winning the rook <7 moves later>...

A really informative POTD, but way beyond my ability...

Aug-11-17  morfishine: I figured <129.Kc6> but thats about it
Aug-11-17  prashantsk107: What is the continuation for white after 129...Rh7?
Aug-11-17  gofer: <prashantsk107: What is the continuation for white after 129...Rh7?>

When there less than 6 pieces left on the board (including kings), then the <Nalimov Tablebases> gives you every possible outcome...

http://www.k4it.de/index.php?lang=e...

Aug-11-17  Nichth: Terrific puzzle. The key for me was first to threaten mate and then to try to find a position that allows whites bishop to cover all the squares where the black rook can give check. This turns out to be b2 which also interposes between the two rooks...
Aug-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  malt: Got 129.Kc6 ( hoping for 130.Kb6 )
129...Rh7 (129...Rh6+ 130.Bd6)
130.Rb8+ Ka7 131.Rb1 Ka8 132.Rg1

129.Kc6 Rc1 130.Kb6

Aug-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  piltdown man: Beautiful!
Aug-11-17  Walter Glattke: gofer: 131.Be5+ Ka8 132.Rxb1 loses the rook and stale mate or draw by 132.Bb2 Kb8 with perpetual.
Aug-11-17  FrogC: It seems a strange puzzle. White won quickly because Black played 131.Rg1? Other defences are much harder to break
Aug-11-17  RandomVisitor: Mate in 19 moves 1. Kc6 Rc1+ 2. Kb6 Rb1 3. Bb2 Kb8 4. Kc6+ Kc8 5. Re5 Kd8 6. Bd4 Rc1+ 7. Bc5 Rc2 8. Re1 Rc4 9. Rd1+ Ke8 10. Rf1 Rxc5+ 11. Kxc5 Ke7 12. Kd5 Kd7 13. Rf7+ Ke8 14. Rh7 Kf8 15. Ke6 Kg8 16. Rf7 Kh8 17. Kf5 Kg8 18. Kg6 Kh8 19. Rf8#
Aug-11-17  takchess: above me, but wanted to try to determine the initial move and I was right to grab the opposition.
Aug-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Took me a while, but I finally found today's Friday (126. ?) puzzle solution as far as <129 Kc6 Rc1+ 130 Kb6 Rb1! 131 Bb2! Rg1 132. Kc7 +-> forcing mate-in-two.

As <gofer> observes, 131...Kb1 makes it much more difficult for White, as he must find 131...Kb8 132.Kc6+! Kc8 133.Re5 Kd8 134.Re2 Rf1 135.Bd4 Rc1+ 136.Bc5 Rc4 137.Rd2+ (not 137.Rf2? Re4 =) 137...Ke8 138.Rf2 +- (mate-in-nine to follow, Stockfish 8 @ 111 depth)

According to the online endgame table base at http://chessok.com/?page_id=361, this Rook versus Rook and Bishop endgame should be a draw with perfect play after 97. Kxf4 Rc4 =.

Unfortunately, as this game indicates, finding perfect computer endgame table base play in a difficult forced endgame draw is not so easy over the board -- even for a strong GM.

Aug-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I think black blundered his king into a corner.
Aug-11-17  Walter Glattke: Stockfish should explain 133.-Rd1 instead 133.-Kd8.
Aug-11-17  Strelets: The hardest endgame for me to play. Solving this was pretty satisfying.
Aug-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: Per the table base these are the optimal moves.

129 Kc6 (only move) Rc1+
130 Kb6 (only move) Rb1
131 Bb2 (only move) Kb8
132 Kc6+ (also 132 Be5) Kc8
133 Re5 (only move)


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Here the superficial threat is 134 Re8# so this forces 133...Kd8


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The rook on the e file also prevents Ke7. That's why 133 Rf5 or Rg5 won't work.

The part I am just now seeing is with the black king on D8 white has a secondary threat 134 Bd4, seeing 135 Bb6+. This line goes 134 Bd4 Rc1+ 135 Bc5 Rc2.


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Now with the bishop pinned on c5 white has to find another winning plan. This makes for a good secondary puzzle. I am stopping here. The solution is in the table base.

Aug-11-17  JimmyRockHound: Piltdown Man beat me to it: Beautiful!
Aug-11-17  nekchess: Thx for the analysis, presentation and explanations and endgame tablebases links, a remarkable puzzle from real world otb game, I was able to guess the first two moves but that was about it...
Aug-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has an extra bishop.

White can create a mating net with 129.Kc6:

A) 129... Rc1+ 130.Kb6 Rb1 131.Bb2 (131.Rxb1 stalemate)

A.1) 131... Kb8 132.Kc6+ Kc8 (132... Ka8 133.Ra5+ Kb8 134.Be5+ and mate in two) 133.Re5

A.1.a) 133... Rxb2 134.Re8#.

A.1.b) 133... Kb8 134.Re8+ Ka7 135.Bd4+ Ka6 13.Ra8#.

A.1.c) 133... Kd8 134.Re2 (protects the bishop and threatens Bf6+, so) 134... Rf1 135.Bd4 Rf8 (135... Rc1+ 136.Bc5 Rc3(4) (due to Bb6+) 137.Ra2 Ke8 138.Rf2 wins.

A.1.d) 133... Rd1 134.Ra5 Kd8 135.Ba3 Ke8 136.Rf5 wins.

A.2) 131... Rh1 132.Rg5 Rh6+ 133.Kc7 Rh7+ 134.Bg7 wins.

A.3) 131... Rf1 132.Rd5 Rf8 133.Ra5+ Kb8 134.Be5+ Kc8 135.Ra8+ wins.

B) 129... Rh6+ 130.Bd6 Rh7 131.Rg5 Rf7 132.Rg8+ Ka7 133.Bc5+ wins.

C) 129... Rh7 130.Bc7 Rh6+ 131.Bd6 transposes to B.

Aug-11-17  drollere: ingenious combination. the K had to move toward c6, so the first move seemed easy. but how to prevent the exchange of Rs and also avoid stalemate? couldn't find it. Bb2 was unexpected and the defense of c1 and a1 deftly exploited.
Aug-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: <JimfromProvidence>

<Here the superficial threat is 134 Re8# so this forces 133...Kd8>

It does? Is 133...Rd1 bad?

Aug-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <Jimfromprovidence> Shortest solution for White to move (136. ?) and win in your puzzle (diagram below)


click for larger view

appears to be 136 Re1! Rc3 (136...Rc4 137. Rd1+ Kc8 138. Rf1 +-; 136...Rd2 137. Bb6+ Kc8 138. Re8+ Rd8 139. Rxd8#) 137. Rf1 +-.

Aug-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: <Fusilli> <It does? Is 133...Rd1 bad?>

Well, it does not help black. White can pivot with 134 Ra5.


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Black still has to play 134...Kd8 to avoid mate. White follows with 135 Ba3 with a mate in one threat. Black can play 135...Ke8 but after 136 Rf5, it's over.


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White still has to make precise moves if 133...Rd1, but in this line the black rook cannot pin the bishop as in the 133... Kd8 line.

Mind you, I did not solve this puzzle. I looked at what the table base says are the correct moves and wrote down my observations on why these moves work.

Aug-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: <JimfromProvidence> Oh, I see. You are right, that wins.

<patzer2> got it right, right?

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