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Judit Polgar vs Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
"Shakh Like a Leaf" (game of the day Aug-31-2007)
Bled Olympiad (2002), Bled SLO, rd 4, Oct-29
Spanish Game: Open Variations. Karpov Gambit (C80)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Given 389 times; par: 11 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 5 OF 5 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-03-17  wondairfoul: Nerwal: thanks for these explanations
Aug-06-17  Iwer Sonsch: Doesn't 22.Rxe5 win so much material that it isn't in any way inferior to the game line?
Aug-06-17  Iwer Sonsch: At least, 24.Qf3+ and 25.b3 ends the game.
Aug-13-17  jffun1958: <Iwer Sonsch> if 24. ... Qe4 25. Qxe4+ Kc4 26. Qxe6+ Kd3 27. Red1+ Kc2 28. Qd2#
Oct-05-17  Weeping Warrior: I Managed Somehow To Score A 34.
Mar-05-18  Arn Zufeld: Minus this,minus that,minus this,minus that,I’d really hate to have you score my tennis match...
Sep-08-18  Caissa04: I scored 61 on guess the move because I remembered the Svidler game that started like this one.
Mar-20-19  chesstauren: Never decline the Karpov gambit!
Apr-02-19  chesstauren: This game is proof that Caissa exists
Sep-15-19  Patzer Natmas: Game featured in "New in Chess - Tactics Training - Judit Polgar"

Solve for white on move 20.

Text states:20.♗g5+! ♔d7 20...♔e8 21.♘f6+ White wins 20...♘xg5 21.♘xg5 White wins 21.♘c5+ ♗xc5 22.♕f7+ ♔d6 23.♗e7+ ♔d5 23...♔d5 24.♕f3+ ♔c4 25.b3#

Jun-25-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: Black had only spent two minutes through 11..Bxd5?! which greatly surprised Polgar as she had previously looked at the line and considered it to be bad for Black. Black played 14..Kf7? instantly though after Polgar's reply 15 Qf5+! (Black probably expected 15 e6) he was completely lost; 14..Ke7 is the only defense though Black has a tough time in this line as well as shown in Svidler-Anand Dos Hermanas 1999 (Black drew this game only by a miracle).

After this game 11..Bxd5?! has been considered to be close to unplayable.

Jul-10-20  MordimerChess: 11. Ng5 is called Karpov Gambit and it seems like taking the knight is the best way to play it. After Qf3 just castle and after Qxc6 continue the game with equal material. It was played couple of times by Anand.

Interesting that 11... Bd5 was played by Anand earlier and he survived the attack of Peter Svidler. Judit Polgar didn't give any chances here.

Also, keep in mind that Shakhriyar Mamedyarov is 17 years old here and still learn to play against top players... and 26y old Judit was not only sharp in tactical game but also very experienced, one of the top World players.

My video analysis of this game:
https://youtu.be/UnFWPDrHkRw

Enjoy!

Jul-10-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: While Black's desire to have his king at the head of his troops is laudable, the poor wretch comes to grief in short order here.
Jul-11-20  SChesshevsky: <...keep in mind that Mamedyarov is 17 years old here...> Think this is very relevant. It is black with 10...d4 that invites possible 11. Ng5 and all the potential complications.

Guessing that 11...Qxg5 has been worked out to some sort of forced or nearly forced draw at some point as 11. Bxe6 looks by far the more popular reply to 10...d4. Or maybe it was just assessed as better.

Think black can pass on all the early sharpness with 10...Be7. Believe Ding Liren, who played the Open Ruy awhile back, tended to mainly go that way.

Jul-11-20  carpovius: Is this Karpov Gambit, right? Somebody knows other games with 12.Nxf7?
Jul-11-20  MordimerChess: <carpovius> Sure, Svidler vs Anand, 1999 Anand survived but was tough :D
Feb-19-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  Bishoprick: Wow! What a finale!
Mar-21-21  Gaito: It is interesting to reproduce Bent Larsen's commentary about the move 11.Ng5!?, played for the first time in the 10th match game in Baguio, 1978 between Karpov and Korchnoi (diagram):


click for larger view

BLACK TO MOVE

"I don't say sorry! But I confess, I am one of many authors who have written about this opening without seeing this move. Probably somebody even saw it and kept his secret? Is it typical Tal? Oh no! Because it is not an unclear piece sacrifice. After 11...Qxg5 12.Qf3 Kd7 13.Bd5! White just wins back the piece with advantage. The sacrifice 13...Nxe5!? 14.Bxe6+ Nxe6 15.Qxa8 Nf4 is not good enough."

Source: Bent Larsen's book on the Baguio, 1978 match.

Mar-21-21  Gaito: Analysis by LcZero after 11.Ng5!? (Hardware: RTX 2080 GPU): 11...Qxg5 12.Qf3 O-O-O! 13.Bxe6+ fxe6 14.Qxc6 Qxe5 15.a4 Qd5 16.axb5 dxc3 17.bxc3 Qxc6 18.bxc6 Rd6 19.Nf3 Rxc6, with equality (diagram)


click for larger view

(Numerical evaluation by the computer: -0.03)

Mar-21-21  Gaito: Analysis by Stockfish 13 after 11.Ng5!? (Hardware: 20 CPU core Dual Xeon E5-2680 v2. At a rate of 30 seconds per move, often depth 52 or deeper): 11...Qxg5 12.Qf3 O-O-O! 13.Bxe6+ fxe6 14.Qxc6 Qxe5 15.a4 Qd5 16.axb5 dxc3 17.Nf3 (here the engine deviates from the move 17.bxc3 suggested by LcZero, as seen in the previous comment) Rd6 18.Qe8+ Rd8 19.Qc6 Rd6 = (evaluation: 0.00). Draw by repetition of moves suggested by the engine. (Diagram)


click for larger view

Mar-21-21  Gaito: Analysis by chess engine Ethereal 12.75 (same hardware as above): 11...Qxg5 12.Qf3 O-O-O! 13.Bxe6+ fxe6 14.Qxc6 Qxe5 15.a4 dxc3 (here the engine deviates from 15...Qd5 as chosen by LeelaZero and SF13) 16.Nf3 Qd5 17.axb5, and by transposition of moves we have reached again the same position of the analysis done by SF13 (see previous diagram)
Mar-21-21  Gaito: Analysis by chess engine Arasan 22.2 (same hardware): 11...Qxg5 12.Qf3 O-O-O 13.Bxe6+ fxe6 14.Qxc6 Qxe5 15.b4! (Arasan considers this move to be better than 15.a4 as chosen by SF13 and other older engines) Qd5 16.Qxd5 exd5!? (a very interesting piece sacrifice typical of modern engines, but it only leads to an equal or unclear position though) 17.bxc5 dxc3 18.Nb3 d4 (=/∞) (Diagram)


click for larger view

Mar-21-21  Gaito: Analysis by chess engine Komodo 13.01 64-bit:
11...Qxg5 12.Qf3 O-O-O 13.Bxe6+ fxe6 14.Qxc6 Qxe5 15.a4 bxa4 (this is a novelty. Other engines played 15...Qd5 or 15...dxc3) 16.Nc4!? Qe4 17.Qxe4 Nxe4 with equality (diagram)


click for larger view

Dec-16-22  Gaito: Some of the younger grandmasters today do not know the classics. But Judit does know the classics! Everybody knows that the move 11.Ng5!? was first played in the 10th match game Karpov vs. Korchnoi, Baguio, 1978. In that game Korchnoi played 11...dxc3 and the game was drawn. Sure enough, after 11...Qxg5 (the best move) 12.Qf3 O-O-O! 13.Bxe6+ fxe6 14.Qxc6 the game is equal. On the other hand, 11...Bd5? is a well-known mistake which is refuted by 12.Nxf7! Of course, Judit knew that, but apparently Mamedyarov did not. Why, doesn't he study the classics?
Dec-16-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: served up like Hungarian goulash. Mamster is like Shirov, brilliant on the attack against slightly inferior players but often gets destroyed by equally talented opponents.
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