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Peter Heine Nielsen vs Darmen Sadvakasov
"Harmin' Darmen" (game of the day Dec-03-2014)
Bled Olympiad (2002), Bled SLO, rd 10, Nov-05
Queen's Gambit Accepted: Classical Defense. Steinitz Development Variation (D26)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Oct-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Black's decisive mistake may have been 15...Qc7?!, allowing 16. Qe4 (+1.43 @ 29 depth, Stockfish 5 x 64).

Instead, 15...Rc8 16. Bf4 Bf6 17. Rd2 (0.46 @ 21 depth, Deep Fritz 15) gives Black a better fighting chance.

Oct-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <PJs Studio> Black made it easier for White with 22...Qxe4?, allowing the surprise winning move 23. Rxf7! (+5.22 @ 27 depth, Stockfish 7).

Although 22. Qxd7 23. Bxc6 Qd3 + - (+2.38 @ 27 depth, Komodo 8) puts up more resistance, it appears all the winning chances still belong to White.

Oct-29-16  gofer: <CG> have decided to give us a queen sac on a Saturday. Today is a good day!

The first two moves are simple and forced.

<19 Bxd6 Rxe4>
<20 Bxe4 ...>


click for larger view

Now we have put black to a decision a) save the remaining rook and lose another minor piece or b) the reverse.

Saving the rook is pretty easy to calculate...

20 ... Re8?
21 Bxc6 Bxc6
22 Nd4 any move
23 Nxc6 winning a piece and threatening the back rank mate with Ne7+!

20 ... Rd8?
21 Ne5 ...

21 ... f6??? 22 Bd5+! Kh8 windmill time!!! or Be6 Nxc6 21 ... Qb7 22 Bxc6 Bxc6 23 Nxc6
21 ... Qa8 22 Nxd7 Rxd7 23 Bxc6
21 ... Be8 22 Bxc6 Rxd6 23 Rxd6 Bxc6 24 Nxc6

Giving up the rook is pretty easy to calculate...

20 ... Qe8
21 Bxf8 Qxe4
22 Rxd7 Kxf8

or

20 ... Qe8
21 Bxf8 Kxf8
22 Rxd7 Qxe4


click for larger view

In both cases, black falls prey to the beautiful 23 Rxf7+!

23 ... Ke8
24 Rxg7! (not 24 Re1 Qxe1+ 25 Nxe1 Kxf7)

24 ... Kg8
25 Rc7 Nd8 (Ne7 26 Rc8+ Nxc8 27 Rxc8+ Kf7 28 Ng5+) 26 Re1 Qg6
27 Rc8

The interesting one is where black opts for a Q v R+B+N end game...

<20 ... Qe8>
<21 Bxf8 Kxf8>
<22 Rxd7 Qxd7>
<23 Bxc6 ...>


click for larger view

Now this is not a completely forlorn hope for black, but its a really really difficult...

<23 ... Qd6>

What's next!?!?!

Oct-29-16  gofer: <patzer2>: Thanks for pointing out black's options after <20 ... Rd8>.

I completely missed this!!!

Oct-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <gofer> You're welcome.

Speaking of things missed, the computer finds a neat winning alternative for White with 21. Bxc6 Bxc6 22. Ne5! (diagram below)


click for larger view

Analysis by Fritz 15 @ 23 depth:

1. (2.65): 22...Be4 23.Bxf8[] Kxf8 24.Rc7[] f6 25.Nf7[] Bd5[] 26.Nd6[] Qe6 27.Rc8+[] Ke7[] 28.Re8+[] Kxd6[] 29.Rxe6+[] Kxe6 30.Re1+ Kd7 31.f3 h5 32.Kf2 g6 33.Rc1 Bc6 34.Rd1+ Ke7 35.Ke3 h4 36.Kf4 Bd7 37.b4 g5+

2. (2.66): 22...Bxg2 23.Bxf8[] Kxf8 24.Nd7+[] Kg8[] 25.Kxg2[] Qe4+ 26.f3[] Qe2+ 27.Kg3[] h5 28.h4[] Qxb2 29.Rc8+ Kh7 30.Rc5 Qxa3 31.Rxh5+ Kg8[] 32.Re5 Kh7 33.Nc5 Qa5 34.Rd6 f6 35.Re7 Qa1 36.Ne4 Qg1+ 37.Kf4 Qh2+

Oct-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: The material is identical.

Black threatens Rxe4 and eventually Bxf4.

The black knight is pinned. This suggests 19.Bxd6 (19.Bxc6 Rxe4 20.Bxe4 Bxf4 21.Rxc8 Bxc8 and Black is not worse) 19... Rxe4 20.Bxe4:

A) 20... Re8 21.Bxc6 Bxc6 22.Nd4 (22.Ne5 Rxe5 23.Bxe5 f6 24.Bg3 Qb7) followed by Nxc6 wins decisive material (this reminds me of Fischer vs Larsen, 1971).

B) 20... Rd8 21.Bxc6 as in A.

C) 20... Qe8 21.Bxc6 Bxc6 22.Ne5

C.1) 22... Ba8 23.Bxf8

C.1.a) 23... Kxf8 24.Nd7+ Kg8 (24... Ke7 25.Re8+ Kxd7 26.Rcd1+ wins) 25.Nb6 Bb7 (due to Rc8) 26.Rc7 Qb8 27.Rxb7 Qxb7? 28.Rd8#.

C.1.b) 23... Qxf8 24.Rc7 with the threat Nf7-Rd8 looks very good for White.

C.1.c) 23... Qxe5 24.Rd8, with the triple threat Be7#, Bd6+ and Rxa8, wins.

C.2) 22... Bb7 23.Rc7 Bc8 (due to Nd7) 24.Bxd6 Qxe5 (24... K(Q)xf8 25.Nxf7 followed by Rd8 wins) 25.Rxc8 as in C.1.c.

C.3) 22... Be4 23.Bxf8

C.3.a) 23... Kxf8 24.Rc7, with the double threat Nxf7-Rd8 and Rcd7-Rd8, seems to win decisive material (24... Qxe5 25.Rd8+ Qe8 26.Rxe8+ Kxe8 27.Ra7 + - [R+P vs B]).

C.3.b) 23... Qxf8 24.Rc7 as above.

C.3.c) 23... Qxe5 24.Rd8 as in C.1.c.

C.4) 22... Bd7 23.Nxd7 Qxd7 24.Bxf8 + - [2R+B vs Q].

Oct-29-16  bla bla: whay not 22...Qd7?
Oct-29-16  Pinkerton: < Oct-29-16 bla bla: whay not 22...Qd7? >

Perhaps Black wanted to keep its N and make it Q+N against R+R+N and even pawns where it's chances compared to a Q against R+B+N is somewhat slightly better.

Q will be put on the defensive against a coordinated R+B+N.

But White has 23.Rf7+ !

Oct-29-16  RandomVisitor: After 22...Qxd7 23.Bxc6


click for larger view

Komodo-10.1-64bit:

+2.69/45 23...Qd3 24.g3 Qb3 25.Be4 Qxb2 26.Rc8+ Ke7 27.Rc7+ Kd8 28.Rxf7 Qxa3 29.Kg2 Qc5 30.Bxh7 a5 31.Rxg7 a4 32.h4 a3 33.Bg8 b4 34.Rg4 Qa5 35.h5 Qxh5 36.Rxb4 Qa5 37.Rb1 Qa6 38.Rc1 Qe2 39.Rc3 Qb2 40.Rb3 Qc1 41.Rd3+ Ke7 42.Re3+ Kf8 43.Bd5 Qc5 44.Ba2 Qb4 45.Rb3 Qc5 46.Rb8+ Ke7 47.Rb7+ Kf8 48.Be6 Qd6 49.Rf7+ Ke8 50.Ng5 Qc6+ 51.Kh2 Kd8 52.Ra7 Qc5 53.Nf7+ Ke8

+2.77/45 23...Qe6 24.Rc2 Qd6 25.Nd2 h5 26.Bf3 h4 27.Nf1 Qf6 28.Ne3 g6 29.Bb7 Qb6 30.Bd5 a5 31.h3 Qd4 32.Bf3 b4 33.axb4 Qxb4 34.Be2 Kg7 35.Nc4 Qc5 36.Rc1 a4 37.Rd1 Kh6 38.Rd6 f5 39.Kf1 Kg5 40.Rd8 Kh6 41.Rd7 Kg5 42.Rd6 Qb5 43.Bd3 Qb4 44.Rd7 Qb3 45.Be2 Qb4 46.Rd6

Oct-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: < morfishine: Full Nielsen ***** >

like they say.. Heine sight is 20/20

Oct-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  steinitzfan: I felt like the first two moves were the only meaningful try. After that I was stymied though. If I could have seen that Black could not avoid further material loss (though slight) in the next couple of moves I think I would have done all right. No real risk for White here -- he establishes a clear material and positional plus in a few moves. It's still hard for me to see.
Oct-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: < patzer2: I missed the best move 21. Bb4! when play might continue 21...h6 22. Bxc6 Bxc6 23. Rxd8+ Qxd8 24. Rxc6 (+2.50 @ 20 depth, Deep Fritz 15). >

yes i was looking at that.. the point being that if black tries to kick the B with an immediate 21...a5 then 22.Be1 blocks a Q check on the back rank and white still picks up the piece

Oct-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: < gofer: <CG> have decided to give us a queen sac on a Saturday. Today is a good day! The first two moves are simple and forced.

<19 Bxd6 Rxe4> <20 Bxe4 ...>

20 ... Rd8?
21 Ne5 ... >

As already stated 21.Bb4! is the strongest move, but after..

21.Ne5 Nxe5 22.Bxe5 (22.Rxc8 Bxc8 is pretty level) 22...Be8 23. Re1 Qd7 24. Bc7 Rc8 25. Bb7 h6 26. Bxc8 Qxc8 27. Ba5 white has won the exchange and has a slight plus with initiative but has to work a whole lot harder for winning advantage and may only draw it.

Oct-29-16  RandomVisitor: After 22...Qxd7 23.Bxc6 black must attempt a dynamic defense - white simply attacks a weak pawn with two (or even three) pieces and black must lose it. Unless he is able to keep white always off balance and threatens to advance any targeted pawns so that they are not captured. Black can put up resistance.


click for larger view

Komodo-10.1-64bit:

+2.70/47 23...Qd3 24.g3 Qb3 25.Be4 Qxb2 26.Rc8+ Ke7 27.Rc7+ Ke8 28.Kg2 Qf6 29.Bd5 h6 30.h4 Qd6 31.Bxf7+ Kd8 32.Rc3 Qf6 33.Rd3+ Kc7 34.Bd5 Qf5 35.Rc3+ Kb6 36.Rc6+ Ka5 37.Be6 Qe4 38.Rd6 Qb7 39.Rd3 Qe4 40.Re3 Qc6 41.h5 Kb6 42.Bf5 Ka5 43.g4 Qd6 44.Ne5 Kb6 45.Ng6 Qc5 46.Nf4 a5 47.Re6+ Ka7 48.Rg6 Qe5 49.Nd3 Qe7 50.f4 Qe2+ 51.Nf2 Qb2 52.Bd3 Qd4 53.f5 Qb2 54.Re6 b4

+2.71/47 23...Qe6 24.Rc2 Qd6 25.Nd2 h5 26.Bf3 h4 27.Nf1 Qf6 28.Ne3 g6 29.Bb7 Qb6 30.Bd5 a5 31.h3 Qd4 32.Bf3 b4 33.axb4 Qxb4 34.Be2 Kg7 35.Nc4 a4 36.Rd2 f5 37.Rd4 Qc5 38.Rd6 Kh6 39.Kf1 Qc8 40.Rd4 Kg5 41.Rd1 Qc5 42.Rd6 Kh6 43.Bd3 Kg5 44.Kg1 Qb4 45.Bf1 Qc5 46.Ra6 Qb5 47.Ra7 Qb4 48.Ra5

Oct-29-16  Pinkerton: < Oct-29-16 RandomVisitor: After 22...Qxd7 23.Bxc6

click for larger view
Komodo-10.1-64bit:

+2.69/45 23...Qd3 24.g3 Qb3 25.Be4 Qxb2 26.Rc8+ Ke7 27.Rc7+ Kd8 28.Rxf7 Qxa3 29.Kg2 Qc5 30.Bxh7 a5 31.Rxg7 a4 32.h4 a3 33.Bg8 b4 34.Rg4 Qa5 35.h5 Qxh5 36.Rxb4 Qa5 37.Rb1 Qa6 38.Rc1 Qe2 39.Rc3 Qb2 40.Rb3 Qc1 41.Rd3+ Ke7 42.Re3+ Kf8 43.Bd5 Qc5 44.Ba2 Qb4 45.Rb3 Qc5 46.Rb8+ Ke7 47.Rb7+ Kf8 48.Be6 Qd6 49.Rf7+ Ke8 50.Ng5 Qc6+ 51.Kh2 Kd8 52.Ra7 Qc5 53.Nf7+ Ke8

+2.77/45 23...Qe6 24.Rc2 Qd6 25.Nd2 h5 26.Bf3 h4 27.Nf1 Qf6 28.Ne3 g6 29.Bb7 Qb6 30.Bd5 a5 31.h3 Qd4 32.Bf3 b4 33.axb4 Qxb4 34.Be2 Kg7 35.Nc4 Qc5 36.Rc1 a4 37.Rd1 Kh6 38.Rd6 f5 39.Kf1 Kg5 40.Rd8 Kh6 41.Rd7 Kg5 42.Rd6 Qb5 43.Bd3 Qb4 44.Rd7 Qb3 45.Be2 Qb4 46.Rd6 >

And just to compare with 22...Qd7, what is the eval on text 22...Qe4

Thanks.

Oct-29-16  RandomVisitor: <Pinkerton>After 22...Qxe4


click for larger view

Komodo-10.1-64bit:

<+8.94/36 23.Rxf7+ Ke8> 24.Rxg7 Kd8 25.h4 Kc8 26.Re1 Qc4 27.Re8+ Nd8 28.Rgg8 Qc1+ 29.Kh2 Qxb2 30.Rxd8+ Kc7 31.Rd3 Qf6 32.g3 h6 33.Re3 Kb6 34.Rge8 Ka5 35.R8e6 Qf8 36.Kg2 Qa8 37.Rxh6 Ka4 38.h5 b4 39.axb4 Kxb4 40.Rb6+ Kc5 41.Ree6 a5 42.Ra6 Qh8 43.Rxa5+ Kb4 44.Ree5 Kb3 45.Reb5+ Kc2 46.Ra7 Qc3 47.h6 Kd1 48.Re5 Qc8 49.h7

Oct-29-16  morfishine: Technically, nobody should be using computers or engines to solve the POTD

Thats the point

So all this after-posting salve is just so much blah, blah, blah, blah, etc...

*****

Oct-29-16  morfishine: Can't we just use our own brains for conversation in this one corner of the chess universe?

Is that asking too much?

*****

Oct-29-16  RandomVisitor: <morfishine>I've always maintained that the computer analysis is just a starting point for human understanding. Otherwise, how do you know that you have solved the puzzle? The GMs are not perfect and maybe a little cross-checking can help everyone here play a little better in tactical positions.

As far as me posting my analysis, I will be happy to post elsewhere.

Oct-29-16  Cheapo by the Dozen: I analyzed far enough to see that Black had to return the exchange, leaving White with a small material gain plus an attack.

I didn't try hard to go much further than that.

Oct-30-16  nalinw: I agree with <RandomVisitor> - engines add to our understanding of complex positions.

I think most of us try the problem on our own - with or without the analysis board. After that it is very enlightening to hear what people have found with engines.

Oct-30-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <RV> Please continue to post your strong engine analysis. I attempt to solve the puzzles first, but then use engines to check for variations I missed.

Those who don't want to see it can always put those of us who use it on ignore.

To me saying you won't use an engine to check chess games or analysis is analogous to saying you shouldn't use a computer to check your math when figuring your taxes or balancing your checkbook.

GMs use computers to check their games and analysis. Why should club players be expected to handicap themselves by not using them?

Oct-30-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: < morfishine: Can't we just use our own brains for conversation in this one corner of the chess universe?

Is that asking too much? >

<morf>, I understand what you're saying. On this topic, however, I disagree with you.

I think engine analysis is great, and it can often reveal tricky lines that offer either an alternative solution or even just improvement of our tactical skills.

Oct-30-16  Pinkerton: < RandomVistor > Much appreciated. Thanks again.
Nov-02-16  Moszkowski012273: Went with 19.Bxc6... which only draws.
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