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Siegbert Tarrasch vs Edmund Thorold
"Rook Before you Reap" (game of the day Dec-05-2006)
Manchester (1890), Manchester ENG, rd 12, Sep-02
French Defense: Tarrasch Variation. Chistyakov Defense (C07)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-05-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <savagerules>: He wasn't that weak; according to the <CG> database he managed to beat Gunsberg, de Vere, and Blackburne on various occasions.
Dec-05-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: 48...Rxd6 49.Rf7+ Kxf7 50.Kxd6 leads to easily won Pawn endgame. Black could have resigned earlier.
Dec-05-06  jumperino: What happens on move 38 if black tries moving the rook to d1 instead of f2?
Dec-05-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: The crucial move of course was d6+. Obviously,black couldn't afford the rook exchange after the capture of the pawn. The black pawns will be gone in a few moves while white's are safe fore about six or seven.

In an odd sort of way,this game is like a king and pawn vs king game-but white has much stronger weapons in his favor.

Dec-05-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <savagerules: Before getting too ecstatic about this ending, White was up a passed pawn against a weak player, what do you expect to happen?> Rook endings with an extra pawn can be extremely difficult to win. Furthermore, the mere fact that Thorold was not among the late nineteenth century chess elite does not mean he was a "weak" player. He put up stiff resistance in this ending. The analysis of this game in Chernev's "Most Instructive Games ..." is well worth studying.
Dec-05-06  Kefka: Is this a japanese pun?
Dec-17-06  Dr. Siggy: Quoting F. Reinfeld, "Tarrasch's Best Games of Chess", New York 1946, pp. 37-8:

"Although White has won a pawn, the ending [after Black's 25th move] is far from easy. The following play readily divides into the following phases:

"1. White protects the d-pawn with his rook and then brings his king to e3, relieving the rook.

"2. The rook moves along the third rank in order to attack the hostile pawns and weaken them by forcing their advance.

"3. The d-pawn, which looks so weak, soon appears in its proper rôle of formidable passed pawn. It is advanced so as to protect the rook at e5. Once the rook is free to move along the fifth rank, it can simultaneously attack Black's pawns and guard White's.

"4. By this time, Black's pieces will be completely tied up, and White will be in a position to advance the passed pawn, convoyed by king and rook.

"5. Above all, Tarrasch strives throughout to lessen his opponent's mobility. Black's terrain is systematically constricted until he is virtually left without a move."

Oct-14-07  Erdkunde: Tarrasch demonstrates yet again the extraordinary power of the isolated Queen's pawn. If Tarrasch had been Black, he probably would have resigned after 24. Nxd4. ;-)
Nov-30-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <savagerules: Before getting too ecstatic about this ending, White was up a passed pawn against a weak player, what do you expect to happen?>

With regard to the foregoing comment (contemptuously dismissing Thorold as a "weak player"), the following game (featured as the GotD one week after this one), in which Thorold crushed Joseph Blackburne, is worth taking note of: E Thorold vs Blackburne, 1890

Dec-23-07  notyetagm: Chernev calls this game <"The most instructive Rook and Pawn ending ever played">.
Dec-23-07  notyetagm: <Dr. Siggy: Quoting F. Reinfeld, "Tarrasch's Best Games of Chess", New York 1946, pp. 37-8: "Although White has won a pawn, the ending [after Black's 25th move] is far from easy. The following play readily divides into the following phases:

"1. White protects the d-pawn with his rook and then brings his king to e3, relieving the rook.

"2. The rook moves along the third rank in order to attack the hostile pawns and weaken them by forcing their advance.

"3. The d-pawn, which looks so weak, soon appears in its proper rôle of formidable passed pawn. It is advanced so as to protect the rook at e5. Once the rook is free to move along the fifth rank, it can simultaneously attack Black's pawns and guard White's.

"4. By this time, Black's pieces will be completely tied up, and White will be in a position to advance the passed pawn, convoyed by king and rook.

"5. Above all, Tarrasch strives throughout to lessen his opponent's mobility. Black's terrain is systematically constricted until he is virtually left without a move.">

Great summary of this rook ending.

Dec-25-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Just realised that there are 36 Tarrasch games in 1890. He just allowed four draws (+32 =4 -0). Impressive!

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches...

Dec-25-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <"The most instructive Rook and Pawn ending ever played"> I wish it was all that easy. I'd be careful for using the superlative.
Mar-17-09  WhiteRook48: reminds me of the "Rook before you Leap" GOTD
Nov-14-11  notyetagm: Game Collection: DECOYS: LOOSENESS: TRADING DOWN ON THE LOOSE SQU

Tarrasch vs E Thorold, 1890 48.d6+!! (48...Rxd6 49.Rf7+! Kxf7 50.Kxd6( ) wins easily)

Jan-29-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: <Dr. Siggy> Thanks for posting that overview by Reinfeld who was an underrated analyst, probably related to putting out so much content at the time.

One of the most famous R&P endings ever.

Nov-01-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: Played right through that book of games (it took early a year with one game a day, but it was the most enjoyable experience of chess I have had) by Tarrasch (his analysis) and with Reinfeld's comments. I recall this game. Tarrasch in his prime was one of the greatest players. He also played some exquisite combinations.

The ex NZ Champion Jonathan Safarti played through the Russian version which is bigger: or he had the German one.

Sep-19-13  Howard: Which book of games is Mr. Taylor referring to?

Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played ?

Sep-19-13  thomastonk: <Howard> Tarrasch's "Dreihundert Schachpartien" or the English edition "Three Hundred Chess Games" covers his chess career until 1894. In my third German edition this game is no. 180, but the editions differ slightly.
Sep-19-16  auroraspitfire: He's referring to the book by F. Reined, Tarrasch's best games of chess. NY, 1946.
May-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jonathan Sarfati: Yes, I got the Russian version when I was there in 1988. Only many years later did the English version become available. https://www.amazon.com/Three-Hundre...
Nov-29-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: Simplification to a pawn ending by 54.Rc8+ and/or 54.axb5 also win easily for White due to the White king's ability to round up the kingside pawns quickly once the rooks come off. Dr. Tarrasch's approach would achieve lasting promotion in fewer moves.
Nov-29-18  sudoplatov: EDO ratings for 1890.

1. Tarrasch 2676
2. Lasker 2664
3. Steinitz 2644
4. Makovetz 2630
5. Bauer 2621
145. Thorold 2290

Jun-11-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marcelo Bruno: <Peligroso Patzer> You are right, his style was very steady, at least in this game. The Brazilian master Orfeu Gilberto D'Agostini, included this endgame in his "Xadrez Básico" (Basic Chess, in portuguese). I just think if it were possible to watch this game presentially.
Jun-26-20  Howard: As much as I dislike criticizing Chernev’s
TMIGOCEP, this game is simply another all-too-typical case where Chernev makes it look like the winner won effortlessly, when in fact it definitely took a lot of work.

See the above-posted Stockfish analysis for proof

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