chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Deep Junior (Computer) vs Garry Kasparov
FIDE Man - Machine WC (2003), New York, NY USA, rd 4, Feb-02
Sicilian Defense: Paulsen. Szen Variation (B44)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

explore this opening
find similar games 5 more Deep Junior/Kasparov games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: At the top of the page we display the common English name for the opening, followed by the ECO code (e.g. "B44"). The ECO codes are links that take you to opening pages.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
Feb-02-03  Bears092: I watched up to about move 30 live. This is one of those games which makes me understand why the general public isn't that interested in chess.
Feb-02-03  mdorothy: I know what your talking about, even though I watched it all. It was just boring, and I couldn't understand why some of the moves were necessary.
Feb-02-03  Spitecheck: I found the game interesting in parts, particularly those parts I could not easily predict, but overall it's ashame that Kasparov's Gambit (as played against Karpov) wasn't able to kill this "bind" opening system altogether. I speak with a semi-false tongue however, I play it consistently as white given an opportunity :).
Feb-02-03  Kenneth Sterling: Kasparov played well for a long period in a highly dangerous position against an unerring machine.
Feb-02-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: 45. ...R5c7 was a very fancy move but made more work for Black to demonstrate the draw. Had he played 45...Rb8 I think it would have been much more clear.
Feb-03-03  Spitecheck: R5c7 I was impressed with, it was one of the moves I had not predicted after a long run of successful "guesses".........However I thought also Rb8 was superior I think this was Kasparov playing for the benefit of the audience, something the emotionless computer can't do!
Feb-03-03  JustAFish: Bears,

I'm actually delighted with the game. The more I look at it, the more subtle and beautiful it appears to be. Of course, there are a lot of moves that I can't quite comprehend (and chalk up to simple "jockeying for position", or, in other words, Kasparov's waiting for a slight imablance to arise that he can pounce on.)

All in all, I've found these games fascinating. Each one of the four has been very different. One reason has been the results- each possible result has been accounted for: Kasparov wins with white, Junior Wins with White, and one draw for each seating arrangement.

Also, the "flavor" of each game has been very different. Game one featured a tactical flourish that led to an overwhelming initiatave for Kasparov. Game two Kasparov deflected an Junior's apparent initiative to make a brilliant and subtle "waiting move/exchange sac" that led to a beautiful attacking position- which was quietly let slip. Game three, Kasparov attacks like mad, and Junior deflects, only to put Kasparov in time pressure that led him not to see a nice combination on Junior's part. Game four was a quiet, but intricate, Petrosian-like struggle for minute positional advantages.

Compare these games to those in the Bareev-Hiarcs match, which all kind of felt the same.

I think this Man Vs. Machine match will long be remembered for the rich, varied and delightful chess that they produced. I'd like to thank Kasparov for being such a passionate and interesting chessplayer and reminding us of how interesting this game really is.

Feb-03-03  Fool on the Hill: It just shows how little I know. After 12)...0-0 Kasparov's opening looks strong, and then by 16) f3-Qc7, whites king side appears very weak. I think Junior, (or his handlers), did a good job here.
Feb-03-03  AirForceOne: Well,
At least I learned from Kasparov how to defend an Rs and Ps ending when down a pawn. Thank you, sir, for a free lesson.
Good luck with games 5 and 6.

Just wonder, why did white not go for a K-side attack and let black have the Q-side attack early in the game?

Maybe that differentiates the human and conputer GMs from an amateur like me, they rarely loose, and I rarely win (or draw either.)

Feb-03-03  Fool on the Hill: <AirForceOne> I'm with you here, f4, g3, & h4 are all vulnerable, from my perspective, after move 16.
Feb-04-03  Moonlit Knight: Any thoughts on 41...a5?
Feb-04-03  Spitecheck: I analysed a5 for quite sometime expecting it to be the move, but as I kept looking it didn't look right. For a start it's only defender for the moment the Rc5 is rather exposed to the two bishops, so it's postion is precarious. Also the pawn on a5 can be targeted by white's black squared bishop. And further to that, he gives away the b5 square for the less useful b4 square, a square that white may find useful.

After a5 I thought 42. Bf2 the Rook has no good square if it stays on the rank hence defending the pawn, white has a number of ways to chase it and if it plays on the file the rook will be lost for a bishop..........eventually in my calculations with a5 I was actually trying to figure out how to sac the exchange conveniently LOL, after all white's bishops are very powerful, maybe he wouldn't mind parting with a rook to bring both of his bishops to life. But it's hardly a safe option compared to the game.

So I think white either plays plays Bf2 or Bb5, the point is the pawn is weaker on a5 anyhow if you recall earlier in the game black had another pawn on a5 via the exchange xa5, I think it's brother although not quite as weak would meet the same eventual fate.

Kasparov defends the pawn on a6 temporarily through tactics and the vulnerability of the b6 pawn. As black in a game like this you can't ask for more than that possibility.

Feb-18-03  Malacha: With live coverage of this game,I wish Kasparov would have played for a go for broke win! I agree with Bearo92 and mdorothy,this was a big chance for chess to be seen in the same exciting light that captured the public in 72' with Fischer/Spassky,but it ended with a whimper.Boring!!
Feb-18-03  Bears092: I think that there could be a rather bright future for quickplay games on TV (G/30ish). Intel was going to sponsor a series of those for TV, but it never happened.
Feb-18-03  Malacha: Quickplay probably would do well on TV.Say, get the top 8-10 grandmasters in the world together.Now that should spark the general public's interest in chess!!
Feb-05-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: I bet Kasparov was pulling some annoyed faces for the last 10 moves.
Aug-14-16  j4jishnu: A good draw to study today.
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any member Iincludinfgall Admin and Owners or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. If you think someone is an idiot, then provide evidence that their reasoning is invalid and/or idiotic, instead of just calling them an idiot. It's a subtle but important distinction, even in political discussions.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

<This page contains Editor Notes. Click here to read them.>

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
Computer - GM games 2003-2007
by biglo
sukhvarshnayyar's favorite games
by sukhvarshnayyar
pegasus' favorite games
by pegasus
An intricate Petrosian-like struggle
from Thunderstorms from a Blue Sky by Benjamin Lau
Kasparov-DeepJunior
by ahedres
GM vs Computer
by larrewl
Garry Kasparov sici 2002 at least
by konjiki
Man Vs. Machine
from Saber273's favorite games by Saber273


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us


Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC