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Alexey Shirov vs Alexei Dmitriyevich Fedorov
"Fire Extinguisher on the Board" (game of the day Nov-25-2008)
Corus Group A (2001), Wijk aan Zee NED, rd 3, Jan-16
Sicilian Defense: Dragon Variation. Yugoslav Attack Modern Line (B76)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-24-03  Cyphelium: 32. Bxc6 Rc8 33. Re8+ Rxe8 34. Rxe8+ Rxe8 35. Bxe8 a3 looks ok for black. Or did you have something else on your mind?
Mar-24-03  skakmiv: what do you think about 33.h7?
Mar-24-03  Cyphelium: 33. h7 seems risky for both players =). Maybe black can hold the game though. Black plays 33.- Qa3+

A/ 34. Kd1 looks dangerous but may be playable:

34.- Rd8+ 35. Ke2 Qxe7+ 36. Qxe7 Rge8 will give rise to an endgame which needs further analyzing, but black seems to be in some trouble. A line I came up with was 37. Qxe8+ Rxe8+ 38. Kf2 Rxe1 39. Kxe1 Bxc2 40. b4 a3 41. Bxc6 Bb3....but what about 42. b5 now? Can black hold the draw after 42. -Bd3 43. b6 Ba6 44. b7 Bxb7 45. Bxb7 Kxh7? Well, whatever...

B/ 34. Kb1 Bxc2+ and suddenly I see that 35. Ka1 wins ! All analysis in vain... Forget it all..

So 33. h7 might just win.

Mar-24-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  crafty: 33. h7 ♕a3+ 34. ♔b1 ♗xc2+ 35. ♔xc2 axb3+ 36. axb3   (eval 5.03; depth 11 ply; 250M nodes)
Mar-25-03  Elrathia Kingi: I was more looking at 32.Bxc6 Rc8 33.Qf7 Rb8 34.Bxa8
Mar-25-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  crafty: 32. ♗xc6 ♕a3+ 33. ♔d2 ♖d8+ 34. ♔c3 ♖ac8 35. ♖e8+ ♖xe8   (eval -0.59; depth 10 ply; 250M nodes)
Nov-25-08  the jam: Why not 25.Qxe2?
Nov-25-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <the jam> Good question! On the face of it, white gets a strong attack with 25...Qxe2 26. fg. Now whether black captures the pawn or not, white will shove one of the h pawns up the board, with his queen on c3 controlling the h8 queening square.

But Fritz reckons that the attack is defendable. He suggests 26...Rb5 with ideas of swinging the rook over to the kingside or blocking the long diagonal with Qe5. With an eval of -2.5, it looks like Fedorov could have taken the bishop.

Nov-25-08  OneArmedScissor: <25. ...Qxe2 26. Re1> and when the queen moves, <Rxe6> followed by <gxh6> and you've got the nasty threat of mate on g7.

But I don't have an engine on this computer, so I'm probably wrong.

Nov-25-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <OneArmedScissor> 25...Qxe2 26. Re1 and then either 26...Qxh5 or 26...Qg4 and I think black can defend without much trouble. Rxe6 leaves black a whole rook down with not much positional advantage to show for it.
Nov-25-08  jinchausti: Very strange Shirov doesn't play the standard plan with white in this line
Nov-25-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  johnlspouge: Toga gives 33.Be4 as even better than 33.h7.
Nov-25-08  belgradegambit: 12....Bxd4 is very rarely played over 12...e5 since most of us Dragon players won't part with the DSB.
Nov-25-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: A classic comedy! White threatens mate in three ways but cannot escape the checks of black's queen.
Nov-25-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: 32 Qxc6 wins material.


click for larger view

Black must exchange queens because of the threat Qxf6+.

Now, after 32...Qxc6, 33 Bxc6 forks black's rook and pawn on the a file. After 33...Ra6, 34 Bxa4 puts white ahead two pawns.


click for larger view

Nov-25-08  moi: what about 36 axb3 ? black doesn't seem to have many checks to give after that, eg: 36 axb3 Ra2+ 37 Kc3 Qxf3+
38 Re3 1-0
Nov-25-08  Aniara: <moi: what about 36 axb3 ? black doesn't seem to have many checks to give after that, eg: 36 axb3 Ra2+ 37 Kc3 Qxf3+ 38 Re3 1-0> Hmm ... 36. axb3 Ra2+ 37. Kc3 Qd2+ 38. Kc4 Rc2 mate looks strong. :-)
Nov-25-08  Cactus: Thanks cg.com. Nice game of the day.
Nov-25-08  Yodaman: What can black do after 33. h7 Qa3+ 34. Kb1 Bxc2+ 35. Ka1? I don't see why it wouldn't be a white victory. Could someone explain?

Nov-25-08  I Offer You A Resign: Good game of the day, CG. Like the name, too.
Nov-26-08  moi: <Anlara: Hmm ... 36. axb3 Ra2+ 37. Kc3 Qd2+ 38. Kc4 Rc2 mate looks strong. :-)> Indeed!

Now, after Ra2+, 37.Kb1 instead of 37.Kc3 is OK for white...

Nov-26-08  Aniara: <Now, after Ra2+, 37.Kb1 instead of 37.Kc3 is OK for white...> I think that black draws with 37. ... Ra1+ in this variation.
Nov-26-08  moi: <Anlara> Damned! You're right again. Gz! :-)
Dec-01-08  Imnotnajdorf: Yodaman is right, I think

33. h7!... 33 Qf4+ fails to Re3 and Qh4 is not playable. 33 Qa3+ 34 Kb1 Bxc2+ (forced move) 35 Ka1!! and black is gone. (Qxd7 fails to hxg8+)

Aug-17-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: In a game between the same two opponents at the 1999 European Team Championships at Bathumi Black had played 18..a5 and the game had ended in a draw; here he varied with 18..Nd5. Yakovich recommended the pawn sacrifice 19 Ne4..Nb4 20 Qe5..Nxa2+ 21 Kb2..Nb4 (21..Bxb3? 22 Nc5) 22 Nc5..Qc8 23 h4 with a strong attack. 21..h6?! was probably not the best defensive setup; better was 21..c5 22 Ra4..Qc7 23 h5..Rb4 24 hxg..fxg 25 Qe3..Bd5 with sufficient counterplay.

Several in this thread have mentioned 25..Qxe2: Fedorov gives 26 gxh..f6 27 Re1 with a win for White.

29 Qxc6..Ra6 30 Qxd6..Rxd6 31 Rxe6..Rxe6 32 Bd5 would have been a winning continuation.

After Shirov missed 33 h7! Black was able to force a perpetual.

A great fighting game.

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