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Christian Bauer vs Viktor Korchnoi
Enghien-les-Bains (2003), France, rd 8, Jun-21
Queen Pawn Game: Symmetrical Variation (D02)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-26-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: Black has a bishop and a pawn for a knight and threatens 32... fxe5 and to exploit the weak light squares around the white king with ... Bd3 or ... Be2 when appropriate. However, a number of squares around the black king are also weak, in particular f7 and f6. If White can divert the black queen from the defense of f7 then Nf7 would deliver mate. Therefore, 32.Qd6:

A) 32... Qxd6 (or 32... Qd8) 33.Nf7#.

B) 32... fxe5 33.Qf6+ Qg7 34.Qxg7#.

C) 32... h5(6) 33.Qxf6+ Kh7 34.Qg6+ Kh8 35.Qh6+ Qh7 36.Nf7#.

D) 32... Qg7 33.Rxg7 Kxg7 34.Rg1+ Kh6 35.Qe7 + -.

E) 32... Rf8 33.Qxc7 exf5 34.Qg7#.

F) 32... Rb7 33.Qxf6+ Qg7 34.Rxg7 Rxg7 35.Rg1 Rcg8 36.Nf7#.

Enough fun at the moment.

May-26-09  David2009: 28 f5! was a lovely move. Capturing the Pawn leads to disaster as in the game: so 28... f6 should have been tried. 29. fxg6 fxe5 does not quite work (see diagram, White to play):


click for larger view

Black's king is exposed but survives. Instead 29 Bxd5 exd5 30 Ng4 Kf7 and Black is hanging on.

May-26-09  Criswell: White realizes that if the queen moves off of the 7th rank that the white knight can ride over to f7 and secure the checkmate. Thus white will pressure black's queen on c7.

Candidates: 32. Qd6

After 32. Qd6 black is forced to A) Lose the game or B) Put his queen in a disadvantageous position. Thus the resignation.

May-26-09  gtgloner: 32. Qd6 looks good to me. Pull the Queen off the coverage of f7. Let's see.
May-26-09  backyard pawn: White chooses 32.Qd6

Now Black has to defend against two immediate mate threats: Nf7 and Qxf6. Only 32..., Rf8 covers both mating squares, but this leaves Black's queen en prise and unprotected. So, after 33.Qxc7 there's a new mating threat of Qg7, and Black has only a couple of nuisance moves to postpone mate.

May-26-09  The Rocket: This took me about 4-5 mins to find! sometimes its too easy:P
May-26-09  zb2cr: I found 32. Qd6 after perhaps 15 seconds of looking; I had seen that if White could eliminate the Queen's coverage of f7, then Nf7#.

The Queen cannot cover the threaten Qxf6# from any of the squares e7, f7, or g7--all of those moves result in the Black Queen being captured.

Moving 32. ... Rf8 would allow 33. Qxc7, and now White is threatening mate on g7 as well as suddenly being a Queen ahead.

May-26-09  randomsac: I think the key move is 32 Qd6 threatening Qxf6#. If ...Qxd6 then Nf7#. The only ways to protect both mating squares involve throwing away the queen (such as ...Rf8 33 Qxc7). ...h4 fails quickly to
33 Qxf6+...Kh7 (...Qg7 Qxg7#)
34 Qg6+ ...Kh8
35 Qh6+ ...Qh7
36 Nf7#
I think I covered everything today.
May-26-09  geeker: Seemed on the tough side for Tuesday, but I find "creeping moves" like 32. Qd6 difficult. It was the first candidate move I actually considered, but it required a couple of minutes for general analysis of the position.
May-26-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  johnlspouge: Tuesday (Easy):

C Bauer vs Korchnoi, 2003 (32.?)

White to play and win.

Material: N for B+P. The Black Kh8 is stalemated by Rg1, so White wants to check, check, check. The White Ra1 can reload Rg1. The Black Qc7 bears the absolute burden of preventing Nf7#, so White should seek to overload Qc7. The White Kh1 is secured from checks.

Candidates (32.): Qd6

32.Qd6 (threatening 33.Qxf6#)

(1) Black cannot give Kh8 luft:

32h6 [or h5] 33.Qxf6+ Kh7 [Qg7 34.Qxg7#]

34.Qg6+ Kh8 35.Qxh6+ Qh7 36.Nf7#

(2) Black cannot protect Pf6 with Rc8, which now bears the burden of protecting Qc7:

32Rf8 33.Qxc7

(3) Black cannot protect Pf6 with Qc7, which bears the burden of preventing 33.Nf7#:

32Qd8 [or Qxd6] 33.Nf7#

(4) Black cannot block the check Qxf6+:

32Rb7 33.Qf6+ Qg7 34.Rxg7 Rxg7

35.Rg1 Rg8 [Rb7 36.Qf8+ Rg8 37.Rxg8#] [else 36.Qxg7#]

36.Nf7# (Smothered Mate)

As usual, Tuesday analysis brings overkill, but the position is a nice illustration of the overloading theme.

May-26-09  karnak64: Unusual to see Korchnoi (admittedly past his prime) in such a predicament -- usually he's the one dishing it out.
May-26-09  WhiteRook48: I'm blind, missed it totally
May-26-09  zb2cr: <Lamine>, a point of correction. You finished your alternate line with "...and Nh6# to follow".

Not quite. Black can run away with his King to prolong the agony further. 37. ... Kf8 and now 39. Nh6+ is not mate, as Black escapes with 39. ... Ke8. 37. ... h5 also prevents the immediate mate by ... Nh6+.

In both cases, White retains a winning advantage, but the move you give is not the appropriate one.

May-26-09  stacase: Black's King has nowhere to go, attack him and it's mate.

Black's Queen guards f7 preventing 32 Ktf7++. So How can Black's Queen be foiled? Hmmmm 32 Qd6 threatens 33 Qxf6++ or 33 Ktf7++. Black's Queen can't foil both, and Black's Rook at c8 is stuck defending the Queen.

May-26-09  Patriot: I did not see this immediately as I looked at silly moves like Nf7+, Ng6+, Rg7, and then saw Qd6.

32.Qd6

Now if 32...Qxd6 33.Nf7#. Or 32...fxe5 33.Qf6+ Qg7 34.Qxg7#. So the only thing that seems reasonable is to free the h7 square...

32...h6/h5 33.Qxf6+ Kh7 34.Nf7

Of course, 34...Qxf7 35.Qxf7+ and 36.Qg7# next.

I like the line others suggested better after 32...h6/h5 33.Qxf6+ Kh7 34.Qg6+ Kh8 35.Qxh6+ Qh7 36.Nf7#. More care was needed in my line since it was not as forcing, but winning nonetheless.

May-26-09  ku0826: after setting up chess-board, Qd6 flush up soon. so i'll use wooden pieces sometime.
May-26-09  awfulhangover: It's only tuesday, but it took me several minutes to solve :-)
May-26-09  charms: After Qd6! Qxd6, Nf7 not only mates, but wins back the queen instantly as well.
May-26-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  doubledrooks: 32. Qd6 takes home the point.

If 32...Qxd6 then 33. Nf7#.

If 32...Rf8 or Rg8, then 33. Qxc7 fxe5 + -.

If 32...Rb7, then 33. Qxf6+ Qg7 34. Rxg7 Rxg7 35. Rg1 Rg8 36. Nf7#

May-26-09  solskytz: Seconds, my friends, seconds!!

Saw Nf7 mate right away. Who protects? The Queen. What does she do about 32. Qd6? hmmm.... no good answer to that - et voila!

Of course, a nice point of the move, is that it adds a mate threat of its own - 33. Qf6 mate - giving black another defensive task, which proves too much. If it was only Nf7 mate to worry about, Black still has plenty of squares along the 7th rank to defend from.

May-26-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: White's move has a dual perpose. First,he threatens 33 ♕f6+ and mate next. Also,he attacks the queen and is 100% immune from capture and of course 33...♖f8 abandons the queen.
May-26-09  PinnedPiece: 32. Qd6 for a Tuesday puzzle.

Beautiful move, took me about a minute and a half to work it out. Once spotted, you know it is decisive.

Personal Result: Success.

May-26-09  lightbishop c5e6: Actually took me a couple of minutes but then I really noticed that the Black Queen is overloaded so: 32. Qd6! wins. If:
32. ... Qxd6?? 33. Nf7#
32. ... Qg7 33.Rxg7
32. Rf8?? 33.Qxc7
May-26-09  Poohblah: wow, I'm an idiot. I figured that I needed to clear the 7th rank to prepare 33. Nf7# so I came up with 32. Qd6. However I threw this away figuring that black would defend with 32. ... Rb7. I totally overlooked the double attack 33. Qxf6#.
May-26-09  Poohblah: again, I'm an idiot. my post should read Qxf6+ not Qxf6#.
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