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Gerlef Meins vs Lev Gutman
75th German Championship (2004), Hoeckendorf GER, rd 9, Feb-07
Budapest Defense: Fajarowicz - Steiner Variation (A51)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Aug-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Way easier than yesterday, which I missed. After 26...Rxf2 the sky is falling on White's king.
Aug-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: OK, it wasn't as bad for White as I thought. Indeed, Black would have had a walloping .05 advantage, according to Houdini 3, if he'd played 35.Kg2 (although he could have secured a larger, but not decisive, advantage earlier).
Aug-21-14  erimiro1: Nice combination, but the game is not over yet, and draw looks possible for white.
Aug-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: <4.Qc2?> is a criminal move for an IM to make. (It scores atrociously: Opening Explorer)

As <FSR> once told me, "you don't need much theory against the Fajarowicz". Indeed, so far I've only counted three things you need to know as White. First and foremost is that 4.a3 is simply best.

Aug-21-14  rickycota: <Shams: <4.Qc2?> is a criminal move for an IM to make. (It scores atrociously: Opening Explorer)> Come on man, there are only 15 games in the entire database, it means (based on the percentages given) 4 games won white and 10 black and 1 draw. In statistics, you need a good big sample to prove a point so, not here.

The problem well,26...Rxf2 gives black an advantage and that's it. White can still draw but I belive with a software you will find that black is winning after Rxf2.

Aug-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: That's a relief. After crashing and burning with yesterday's, today we have an easier (for me anyway) POTD.

After 26...Rxf2, white is just about compelled to play 27. Kxf2.

Other tries: 27. Rxf2 Qxg3+ 28. Kh1 Rxf2. Yuck. White can cause some mischief with queen checks, but black has a fantastic attack.

27. Rxb2? Qxg3+ 28. Kh1 Qh2# or Qg2#

After 27. Kxf2 Qf5+ 28. any Rxc2, we have won a pawn and have kept a rook on the seventh.

Is that enough to win? Don't know, but I can't see anything better.

Like FSR's Houdini, my Fritzie reckons that it should be a draw with best play. But black's position is the easier of the two to play. He has all the attack, which means that he is less likely to make a mistake.

Aug-21-14  diagonalley: hmmm... picking the first move is not too difficult (after all, black has to find something dynamic in order to counter white's extra passed pawn) ... but a conclusive follow-up - if there is one - appears to be some way off. nonetheless 26....RxP looks to be black's best hope given the situation ... a bit protracted for a thursday
Aug-21-14  sfm: <al wazir: I got the first two moves, but not the next ten.> Good enough! In chess we are only supposed to find one move - the next right one. If done so, the reasons are only of theoretical importance.
Aug-21-14  morfishine: Nice Finish, I had <26...Rxf2> 27.Rxf2 Qxg3+ 28.Kh1 Rxf2

*****

Aug-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Cheapo by the Dozen: I finally figured out my error -- the f2 rook can retreat to interpose at f8. But I'm still having difficulties, as per lines like:

26 ... Rxf2
27 Rxf2 Qxg3+
28 Kh1 Rxf2
29 Qe8+ Rf8
30 Qxe6+ Kh8
31 Qxd6 Qxh4+
32 Kg1 Qf2+
33 Kh1

Black has lots of forcing moves, but I'm not quite bringing home the win.

Aug-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <Cheapo by the Dozen> It is certainly not easy! I had to turn to Fritzie for a finish in the 27. Rxf2 line:

27. Rxf2 Qxg3+ 28. Kh1 Rxf2 29. Qe8+ Rf8 30. Qxe6+ Kh8


click for larger view

Material is level but white has the draughtier king. Black has threats of Qxh4+ and/or Qf3+ winning the white rook.

There are several plausible white moves from this position, so it's hard to give concrete variations. Fritzie wins from here by engineering a rook lift to the g file. One sample line:

31. Rb1 Kh7 32. Qe4+ Kh6 33. Qg2 Qxh4+ 34. Kg1 Rf5


click for larger view

White has run out of checks. Rg5 is going to hurt. A lot.

The conclusion seems to be that 26...Rxf2 is the strongest move in the puzzle position. The reply 27. Kxf2 ought to lead to a draw but it's a tough defensive job for white to hold the half point. 27. Rxf2 leads to a black win, but it takes several moves to prove it.

Aug-21-14  PJs Studio: Nice work Once.
Aug-21-14  zb2cr: I'm with <al wazir>.
Aug-21-14  Refused: 26...Rxf2 and party time.
27.Rxf2 Qxg3+ and white is getting mated.

27.Kxf2 Qf5+ 28.Kg1 Rxc2 29.Rf1 Qg6 and the attack continues. White might be able to hold on, but black should have all the fun, while white is stuck with a unpleasent and difficult defensive task.

Aug-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Wow. Just like yesterday's puzzle, it's easy to overthink things.
Aug-21-14  patzer2: Very useful and instructive Thursday puzzle. Got 26...Rxf2! and the initial Queen-fork (double attack) follow-up only because it was flagged as a puzzle position.

Had it not been a puzzle position, can't say I would have even considered it.

Aug-21-14  Mating Net: <Had it not been a puzzle position, can't say I would have even considered it.> Ditto for me <patzer2> It's a forcing move, but not a check which makes it harder to consider.
Aug-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Castleinthesky: I didn't get yesterday's but today seemed fairly easy as Rxf2 was the only viable option to create mayhem. None of white's options prevented the loss of material or the game as a whole.
Aug-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I saw 26...Rxf2!! Now a bad move, eh?
Aug-21-14  M.Hassan: Medium"
Black to play 26...? and black is a pawn down.

26............Rxf2
27.Kxf2 Qf4+
28.Kg1 Rxc2 now each has 4 pawns
29.Rf1
There are other moves but I chose this one as I thought it is the best for White. 29............Qg6
30.Qa8+ Kh7
31.Qf3 d5
32.Rf2 Rc3
33.a4 Rc4
35.a5 Rxh4
36.Rb2 Ra4
Now Black will be two pawns up.
If White defends by taking the Rook on move 27, then the following line applies(have received help from Chessmaster program on this)

26.............Rxf2
27.Rxf2 Qxg3+
28.Kh1 Rxf2
29.Qe8+ Kh7
30.Qxh5+ Kg8
31.Qe8+ hoping for a draw by repetition
31.............Rf8
32.Qxe6+ Kh8
33.Qe4 Qh3+
34.Kg1 d5
<if 35.Qxd5 Qxe3+ 36.Kh1 Qh3+ 37.Kg1 Qg4+ 38.Kh1 Qxh4+ 40.Kh1 Rf3 41.Qd8+ Kh7 and cannot check any more unless 42.Qd3+ Rxd3> 35.Qg2 Qxe3+
36.Kh1 Rf4
37.Rf1 Rxh4+
38.Qh2 Rxh2+
39.Kxh2
and White Queen is lost
Time to check

Aug-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: Black is one pawn down.

The pawn on f2 protects g3 and the back queen can fork c2 and f2 from f5. These details suggest 26... Rxf2:

A) 27.Kxf2 Qf5+

A.1) 28.Qf4 Qxc2+ 29.Kf3 (29.Ke1 Qe2#; 29.Kf1 Qxd1#; 29.Kg1 Qg2#) 29... Qg2#.

A.2) 28.Ke1 Rxc2

A.2.a) 29.Rd2 Rc3 and Black's position looks preferable.

A.2.b) 29.Qc4 Qb5 30.Qf3 (30.Qf1 Qa5+ and mate next; 30.Rd2 Qa5 31.Qe2 Rxd2 32.Qxd2 Qxa3 wins a pawn) 30... Qa5+ 31.Kf1 Qxa3 wins a pawn (32.Qxh5 Qa8 wins).

A.3) 28.Kg1 Rxc2 29.Rf1 (29.Rxd6 Qf2+ 30.Kh1 Qg2#) 29... Qg6 and Black has recovered the pawn and weakened White's position.

A.4) 28.Ke2 Rxc2+ 29.Rd2 (29.Ke1 Qf2#) 29... Rc1 and Black looks better.

A.5) 28.Kg2 Rxc2+ 29.Qxc2 (else mate soon) 29... Qxc2 - + [Q vs R].

B) 27.Rxf2 Qxg3+ 28.Kh1 (else mate at once) 28... Rxf2 29.Qe1+ (29.Qa1+ Kh7 30.Qe4+ g6 31.Qb7+ Kh6 and mate in two) 29... Rf8

B.1) 30.Qxe6+ Kh8

B.1.a) 31.Qxd6 Rf1+ 32.Rxf1 Qxd6 wins.

B.1.b) 31.Rg1 Qxh4+ 32.Kg2 Rf2#.

B.1.c) 31.Qd5 Qxh4+ 32.Kg1 (32.Kg2 Rf2+ 33.Kg1 Qh2#) 32... Qg4+ 33.Kh1 (33.Qg2 Qxd1+) 33... Rf3 seems to win (34.Rd2 Qh3+ and 35... Rf1#).

B.1.d) 31.Rc1 Qxh4+ and Black has at least an extra pawn.

B.2) 30.Qxh5 Qh3+ 31.Kg1 Qxe3+ 32.Kh1 Qe4+ 33.Kg1 Rf5 34.Qe8+ Kh7 looks winning.

Aug-21-14  rudranshumeher: 26 ... Rxf2
27 Kxf2 Qf5+
28 Ke2
& 100% dead draw
Aug-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Cheapo by the Dozen: Thanks, <Once>. I guess what I missed wasn't as obvious as I feared.

This puzzle seems to have come a little early in the week if we're expected to have analyzed all the way through to a clear Black win. On the other hand, if it's just a matter of flipping the game to a nice combination of material-plus-initiative, then I think we all did a pretty good job of solving it. :)

Aug-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Cheapo by the Dozen: And by the way -- I'm in the camp that says this was a lot easier over the board than in a puzzle. ... Rxf2 was clearly an advantageous move, so you play it and put the burden on White to pick a way through the complications.
Oct-16-14  chaimzvi10: 4 Cheapo by the Dozen: I finally figured out my error -- the f2 rook can retreat to interpose at f8. But I'm still having difficulties, as per lines 26 ... Rxf2
27 Rxf2 Qxg3+
28 Kh1 Rxf2
29 Qe8+ Rf8
30 Qxe6+ Kh8
31 Qxd6 Qxh4+
32 Kg1 Qf2+
The answer to 31.Q;d6 is Rf1+ and white loses the Q
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