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Ortvin Sarapu vs Walter Shawn Browne
"Brownean Motion" (game of the day Jan-10-2013)
Chess Olympiad Final-C (1972), Skopje MKD, rd 6, Oct-12
Indian Game: Spielmann-Indian (A46)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-20-08  PuzzleMaster: Thu 2008.08.20 (Black to play. 32 ... ?)

Candidates: 32 ... Bh4, 32 ... Rd4

A) 32 ... Bh4 wins R (33. Rg1?? Qxg1+ 34. Kxg1 Rd1+, etc. )

B) 32 ... Rd4 33. Qe5 unclear

Wow, that took me forever to solve.

Aug-20-08  456: Tuesday puzzle Aug-19-08 <22. ...?> H Ibrahim vs Sadvakasov, 1995
Aug-20-08  PinnedPiece: Rats.

I was certain that the bishop should move to D2, then if

33. Rd1 Bxc1
or if

33. Bxd2 Rxd2 with some fending off of a Q attack on the 8th rank, but ultimately mate on g2.

Ugh.

Apr-14-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  chesssantosh: i completely agree with <once>.we are too programmed that we only look for forcing move... either check or capture
Oct-28-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Browneian Motion.
Jan-10-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Pun is...a physics term?
Jan-10-13  weisyschwarz: Kodak term?
Jan-10-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Infohunter: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Browni...
Jan-10-13  ChessYouGood: Good work from the Australian, which makes me wonder: besides Fischer, were there any top level "American" chess players who were actually born in America? Maybe Morphy is the only one. Hit rate at one per century it seems.
Jan-10-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Mendrys: ChessYouGood, of course there were and are top level "American" chess players. Ever hear of Pilsbury, Fine, Marshall or Bisguier? Nakamura was 2 when his family move to the US so I doubt he picked up much of his chess skill from his birth country. Are the countries with a better chess pedigree? Of course there are but that's no reason to minimize the number of good chess players who were either born here or moved here at a young age.

In any case, hats off to FSR for coining yet another pun for the GOTD. I've never played thru this game but I love Browne's patience against white energetic play at the beginning.

Jan-10-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  johnlspouge: The finish is nice:

33.Rg1 Qxg1+ 34.Kxg1 Rd1+ 35.Qe1 Rxe1#

Jan-10-13  Abdel Irada: Striking to realize that Lucretius was writing about atomic theory (in poetry, no less) over two millennia ago:

<The Roman Lucretius's scientific poem "On the Nature of Things" (c. 60 BC) has a remarkable description of Brownian motion of dust particles. He uses this as a proof of the existence of atoms:

"Observe what happens when sunbeams are admitted into a building and shed light on its shadowy places. You will see a multitude of tiny particles mingling in a multitude of ways... their dancing is an actual indication of underlying movements of matter that are hidden from our sight... It originates with the atoms which move of themselves [i.e., spontaneously]. Then those small compound bodies that are least removed from the impetus of the atoms are set in motion by the impact of their invisible blows and in turn cannon against slightly larger bodies. So the movement mounts up from the atoms and gradually emerges to the level of our senses, so that those bodies are in motion that we see in sunbeams, moved by blows that remain invisible."

Although the mingling motion of dust particles is caused largely by air currents, the glittering, tumbling motion of small dust particles is, indeed, caused chiefly by true Brownian dynamics.>

From the Wikipedia article on Brownian motion posted by <Infohunter> above.

Jan-10-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: It's fascinating to look at the course of the game from move 20 on with an engine, see its evaluations change, and try to understand how White's position gradually deteriorated from "equal" to "smoldering wreck." According to Houdini, the position was dead equal at move 20 (0.00). 21.e4 was OK, but White's king ended up exposed after the position opened up. Given that White obviously would have been happy with a draw, 21.Qd3 bxc4 22.Rxc4 Rxc4 23.Qxc4 Rc8 24.Qd4 h6 25.Rc1, keeping the position dead equal, was a better choice. The position after Browne's 24...d5 is critical juncture: it would have stayed almost equal (-0.17) if White had played 25.Bxf6! After 25.cxd5?! Nxd5, Black was slightly better (-0.32), apparently because of his beautiful knight and White's somewhat drafty king position. 28.Nf4, walking into a pin, was a further error, says Houdini, as was 30.Re1. Better was 30.Rc2, keeping the second rank, even though Black can chase White's king to the center, and win a pawn, with 30...Qb6+ 31.Kf1 Rd1+ 32.Ke2 Qg1 33.Rd8+ Rd8 34.Rxd8+ Bxd8 35.f4 Qxh2 (-0.52). White's last chance to fight on was 32.Bc3 Qxa2 33.Qc4 (-1.38). After 32.Bc1? Bh4! Black wins a rook and the evaluation goes off the charts (-9.51).
Jan-10-13  njchess: Vintage Dr. Browne. What I like about this game is Black's handling of the center; in particular, the handling of the "hole" on e4. The only way for White to remove Black from this square is by weakening his defense around his king by playing f3.

Black continues his center play by posting his knight on d5, giving him a huge advantage which is then followed by his rook, effectively ending the game. Throughout, White does contest for the center, and even occupies it for a time, but never convincingly. Every time White attempts to trade material, his position worsens. Again, vintage Dr. Browne.

Jan-10-13  jonjon9787: is 13.Ncb5 a bait? i dun understand why black dun take it, anyone please?
Jan-10-13  morfishine: Hi <ChessYouGood> On your question: <Good work from the Australian, which makes me wonder: besides Fischer, were there any top level "American" chess players who were actually born in America? Maybe Morphy is the only one. Hit rate at one per century it seems>

I think I know what you are asking; Of course there are plenty of American born GM's, too long to list. But "top level" with respects to challenging for the World Title, or having the ability to challenge, Pillsbury comes to mind.

Jan-10-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  The HeavenSmile: <jonjon9787> 13...axb5 14. cxb5 and the knight is pinned to the unprotected queen. White will gain a dangerous pawn on c6 after recapturing the knight
Jan-10-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Poor rook;he has nowhere to go and cannot stay where he is. He can't even run for cover:

33 ♖g1 ♕xg1+ 34 ♔xg1 ♖d1+ 35 ♕e1 ♖xe1#

Jan-10-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: On the pun:

In 1827 a biologist Robert Brown was using a new fangled microscope to see pollen floating in water. To his surprise he saw them wiggling around, as if they had tiny legs or something. Ideas were formed about how pollen might literally "grab" the things around it with tiny appendages.

Of course those theories were just hooey. Many years later a fellow named Albert Einstein opined that Mr. Brown was witnessing the light delicate pollen grains being buffeted around by fast-moving water molecules or other atoms. Because the pollen is just as likely to be hit from above as below, or from the left as from the right, they tend to wiggle around randomly. Whether in physics or mathematics, this random wiggling is referred to as Brownian motion (with an "i").

So we can't say that Brown was witnessing atoms *directly* but it's about as close as one can actually get... and all this with 1820's technology! (What's more, Einstein was the first to recognize the achievement! When your resume is as long as Albert's, such small triumphs are often overlooked.)

Jan-10-13  abuzic: Brownian motion
The Roman Lucretius's scientific poem "On the Nature of Things" (c. 60 BC) has a remarkable description of Brownian motion of dust particles. He uses this as a proof of the existence of atoms:

"Observe what happens when sunbeams are admitted into a building and shed light on its shadowy places. You will see a multitude of tiny particles mingling in a multitude of ways... their dancing is an actual indication of underlying movements of matter that are hidden from our sight... It originates with the atoms which move of themselves [i.e., spontaneously]. Then those small compound bodies that are least removed from the impetus of the atoms are set in motion by the impact of their invisible blows and in turn cannon against slightly larger bodies. So the movement mounts up from the atoms and gradually emerges to the level of our senses, so that those bodies are in motion that we see in sunbeams, moved by blows that remain invisible."

Jan Ingenhousz had described the irregular motion of coal dust particles on the surface of alcohol in 1785 nevertheless the discovery is often credited to the botanist Robert Brown in 1827. Brown was studying pollen grains of the plant Clarkia pulchella suspended in water under a microscope when he observed minute particles, ejected by the pollen grains, executing a jittery motion. By repeating the experiment with particles of inorganic matter he was able to rule out that the motion was life-related, although its origin was yet to be explained.

The first person to describe the mathematics behind Brownian motion was Thorvald N. Thiele in a paper on the method of least squares published in 1880. This was followed independently by Louis Bachelier in 1900 in his PhD thesis "The theory of speculation", in which he presented a stochastic analysis of the stock and option markets. Albert Einstein (in one of his 1905 papers) and Marian Smoluchowski (1906) brought the solution of the problem to the attention of physicists, and presented it as a way to indirectly confirm the existence of atoms and molecules. Their equations describing Brownian motion were subsequently verified by the experimental work of Jean Baptiste Perrin in 1913.

Reference: Wikipedia

In 1827 the English botanist Robert Brown noticed that pollen grains suspended in water jiggled about under the lens of the microscope, following a zigzag path. Even more remarkable was the fact that pollen grains that had been stored for a century moved in the same way.

In 1889 G.L. Gouy found that the "Brownian" movement was more rapid for smaller particles (we do not notice Brownian movement of cars, bricks, or people). =Although the late has good sized legs (two each) and other animals have four each=. In 1900 F.M. Exner undertook the first quantitative studies, measuring how the motion depended on temperature and particle size.

The first good explanation of Brownian movement was advanced by Desaulx in 1877: "In my way of thinking the phenomenon is a result of thermal molecular motion in the liquid environment (of the particles)." This is indeed the case. A suspended particle is constantly and randomly bombarded from all sides by molecules of the liquid. If the particle is very small, the hits it takes from one side will be stronger than the bumps from other side, causing it to jump. These small random jumps are what make up Brownian motion.

References =Except between equators!!!=: Encyclopedia Brittanica 1968, "Brownian Movement."

Jan-11-13  kios: Wonerful lesson! Science in chess class
Apr-18-13  hedgeh0g: 32...Bh4! is a sexy last move.
Jan-05-17  clement41: I am not familiar with this opening but is 7 d5 a serious alternative? White is ready to put a piece on d5 in the event of an exchange, and for now denies c5 to the Be7, c6 to the Nb8, and is threatening d6. Admittedly, leaving the c5/d4 tension is also very good for white (an exchange would bolster his wn center and activate his Bc1)

13...ab 14 cb Nxd4?! 15 Qxc7 Nxe2+ Kf1 and black is down lots of material

The mating sequence in the end after 33 Rg1 QxR+ 34 KxR Rd1+ 35 Qe1 RxQ# is rare in that the Bh4 covering f2 to lock the back rank is a rather uncommon theme

Jan-05-17  Shams: <clement41> 7.d5 d6 and what is your next move for White, out of curiosity? I want to say that ...e5 counts as a threat for Black, but could be wrong.
Jan-12-17  clement41: <shams>, if 7 d5 d6, then perhaps 8 0-0 and if 8...e5 your DSB is a bit passive. But this closed center game is fully playable I guess.
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