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Michael Adams vs Hussien Asabri
FIDE World Championship Knockout Tournament (2004), Tripoli LIB, rd 1, Jun-19
Spanish Game: Berlin Defense (C65)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-19-04  shr0pshire: a great mating net by Adams. Forcing black on the next move to trade rooks.

White goes up by at least a rook in the next two moves. if after the rooks are traded, black recaptures with his bishop, then Ne7+ is lethal.

Great position by Adams, great control.

Too bad he had an opponent 450 elo points below him. He really didn't get tested with this opponent.

Jun-19-04  Bobsterman3000: Maybe black could have staved off defeat for a while longer by doubling on the H-file with 32...Rh7 and 33....Reh8? Attacking the a4 pawn sure was silly, since it could be easily countered by b3 anyway...
Jun-19-04  PinkPanther: <shr0pshire>
That's why they call him "Spiderman", and that's why I'm proud to call him my favorite player....closely followed by Ponomariov.
Jun-19-04  dragon40: Adams is a truly FINE player, partucularly with the White pieces he is doubly dangerous and has to be a favorite to win this thing! He seems to be in good form here, regardless of his opponent, which is also encouraging!
Jun-19-04  Lucky1: What does white do after 35 Rxh5 Bg7
Jun-19-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <Lucky1: What does white do after 35 Rxh5 Bg7> 36.Qh2.
Jun-19-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Black resigns seeing that 35...Bg7 36. Qh2 Kf6 37. Rh6+ Bxf6 38. Qxh6# or 35...Rh8 36. Rxh8 Bxh8 37. Ne6+ dropping the Queen are both losing options.
Jun-20-04  Lucky1: Thanks patzer2 & Gypsy.
Jun-21-04  yoniker: Here one of Libya's patzers plays instead of one of israel's GMs.

That is so sad...

Jun-29-04  PinkPanther: Adams wouldn't have been playing against a GM anyway, not in the first round.
Jul-10-04  WMD: David Norwood in the Telegraph after 19. dxc4 :

"White already has two sets of doubled pawns and material is level. My Fritz gives Adams a slight advantage. Fact is, Black's bishop is a no-hoper and his position is terribly passive. Key outposts such as f5 and h5 belong to White. Playing Black against a master strategist such as Mickey, you are as good as dead ..."

Dec-14-04  AdrianP: CBM 102 annotations on 20 g4! "Adams plays for the most natural plan in the position. The first step is to establish a knight on f5, the second step is to put maximum pressure on h6. It takes time but it wins.".

on 33 Rdh2 "White has achieved his plan and Black can resign.".

There are not many players who can control a position like Adams.

Dec-14-04  PizzatheHut: A couple questions:

<1> Why was black so anxious to capture white's dark squared bishop? The bishop was doing nothing but biting on granite anyway. I guess black thought the bishop would put too much pressure on e5.

<2> Why did black capture white's bishop with 18...Bxc4? It looks like he played into white's hands after 19. dxc4. After the bishop trade, black's position already looks devoid of counterplay, which isn't a fun place to be against Adams.

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