chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing
Boris T Vladimirov vs Zbigniew Doda
Leningrad, U.S.S.R. (1967)
Benoni Defense: Four Pawns Attack. Main Line (A69)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Get this game explained with Decode Chess
explore this opening
find similar games 247 more games of B Vladimirov
sac: 18.Rxf5+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You should register a free account to activate some of Chessgames.com's coolest and most powerful features.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 5 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jun-01-12  sevenseaman: Thanks <LoveThatJoker>. I went through that article.

I must have become a fossil!

In this upside down world I need to learn how to stand on my head.

Jun-01-12  daveinsatiable: Hey <once>, it's good to have you back! Love reading your contributions.

For the record I nailed the Kf7 variation, but chess blindness struck on the Kh8 variation, meaning that I would have been checkmated on a1 after Kh8, Qxf6+ Rxf6, Rxf6. I gleesfully figured that the queen couldn't cover the f8 square, neglecting both the mate on a8, the bishop deflection on c8 and black's capacity to cover f8 by simply moving his knight. A triple oversight. Minus points for me.

Jun-01-12  LoveThatJoker: <sevenseaman> It is an upside down world. Thank you for saying that!

LTJ

Jun-01-12  SimonWebbsTiger: @<Once>

I am glad you didn't use the word "dope" in your funny piece. You old fart.

sincerely

another old fart

Jun-01-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: Whew, took awhile: <24.Qg5+ Kf7 25.Rxf6+ Rxf6 26.Qg7+ Ke6 27.Qe7+ Kf5 28.Qe4 mate>

or 24.Qg5+ <24...Kh8> 25.Bg7+ Bxg7 26.Qd8+ mating

A picture is worth a thousand words, but today, I'll let somebody else draw the pictures...

Jun-01-12  poszvald: I think I have it, with 3 possible outcomes, where white surely wins in spite of the fact that black is continuously threatening with mate and is a peace up, however the peaces of white are really close to the defenseless black King, which wins for white in the end:

a, 1, Qg5+! Bxg5
2, Rf8#

b,
1, Qg5+! Kh8
2, Bg7+ Bxg7 (..Kg8, 3, Bxf6+ Kf7 4, Be5+ Ke8 5, Qe8+ Kd7 6, Qg7 Kc6 7, Qc7#) 3, Qd8+ Re8
4, Qxe8+ Bf8
5, Qxf8#

c, 1, Qg5+ Kf7
2, Rxf6+ Rxf6 (..Ke7 3, Rxe6+ Kd7 4, Qe7+ Kc6 5, Qc7#) 3, Qg7+ Ke7
4, Qe7#

Nice puzzle:)

Jun-01-12  sevenseaman: #70873


click for larger view

White.

Jun-01-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <Simon> In my grandfather's day, "dope" was the sticky stuff you painted onto biplane wings to make the fabric go hard.

Then it became another word for drugs.

Or another word for an eedjit. Didn't Mohammed Ali use "rope a dope" tactics to defeat Foreman in the Rumble in the Jungle?

Next you'll be telling me that it's the new name for the acres of underpant that young men insist on showing the world. Or something like that.

Heck, I don't know. I still get confused by shoelaces. ;-)

Jun-01-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <Once> "PICNIC" Hah Hah!
Jun-01-12  poszvald: Sevenseamen:

White Q can not take Rg6, as after that balck Q goes down to the first row with check, takes the rook with check and then finally the queen as well and wins.

But it works with the following line:
1, Qe5+ Rg7 (..Bg7 2, Qf8#)
2, Rxh7+ Kh7
3, Qh5#

Jun-01-12  KholdStare: Not just this puzzle, but this entire game is great!
Jun-01-12  sevenseaman: < poszvald: > Nicely explained. Did you see the need for a continuous check in this puzzle too?
Jun-01-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: After <24.Qg5+ Kf7> I calculated most of the time on <25.Qg7+> Ke8 26.Qg8+ Kd7 27.h3 Re1+ 28.Kh2 but unfortunately that leads to nowhere.


click for larger view

Jun-01-12  sevenseaman: Whole day almost and I hadn't gone through the game. I too find it a very imaginatively played game <KholdStare>.
Jun-01-12  gars: I don't understand anything anymore! This week I went wrong on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and I solved it today! Maybe this is a misplaced Monday POTD, go figure ...
Jun-01-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Pawn and Two: With white's king in danger and down material, I decided an attack starting with a queen or rook check were the candidate moves. I decided to first consider 24.Qg5+, as it put the queen on the useful h4-d8 diagonal, and 24...Bxg5 or 24...Bg7, were clearly inadequate for the defense.

After 24.Qg5+ Kh8, white easily wins with 25.Bg7+, but the defense 24...Kf7 caused me some trouble, until I realized 25.Rxf6+! Rxf6 26.Qg7+ would lead to a quick mate.

Jun-01-12  David2009: B Vladimirov vs Doda, 1967 White 24?

Black is threatening Re1+ mating, and Qa1+ in some lines, so White has to be accurate: 24.Qg5+ Kf7 25.Rxf6+ Rxf6 26.Qg7+ Ke6 28.Qe7+ Qf5 29.Qe4#. All Black moves were forced after the first move. If 24....Kh8 25.Bg7+ Kg1 (or 25...Bxg7 Qd8+) 26.Bxf6+ should win. Time to check:
====
Here's the puzzle position


click for larger view

with an interactive link to Crafty End Game Trainer:
http://www.chessvideos.tv/endgame-t...

The EGT lasts nine moves, defending with 24...Kh8 25.Bg7+ Kg8 26.Bxf6+ Kf7 27.Be7+ Rf6 28.Qxf6+ Ke8 29.Qf7+ Kd7 30.Bf8+ Kd8 31.Qe7+ Kc8 32.Qe8#. Very pleasant problem.

Jun-01-12  gofer: Black thinks he is not doing that badly. He has huge back rank mate threats and also is a whole rook up. Okay his king is exposed and his Ra8 and Nb8 aren't doing much, what's white got for his rook except Pd6?

Well black is not quite correct. White has the pin to end all pins. Bf6 is glued to the spot as it stops Rf8#, so all white has to do it leverage that strength to move the queen into an excellent attacking position.

<24 Qg5+ ...>

The white queen now has entry points on d8 e7 f6 g7 and black as only limited control of these dark squares...

24 ... Bxg5 25 Rf8#

24 ... Bg7 25 Qxg7#

24 ... Kh8 25 Bg7+ Kg8 (Bxg7 Qd8+ mating!) 26 Bxf6+ Kf8/Kf7 27 Qg7+ Ke8 28 Qg8+ Kd7 29 Qd8+ Kc6 31 Qc7#

24 ... Kf7 25 Rxf6+! Rxf6 (Ke8 26 Rxe6+ Kd7 27 Qe7+ Kc6/Kc8 28 Qc7#) 26 Qg7+ Ke6 27 Qe7+ Kf5 28 Qe4#

So does white have to demonstrate this win or not...

Time to check...

~~~

Hmmm. Yes white had to play it out, even though black was <as dead as a Doda> after the 24th move...

Jun-01-12  Marmot PFL: after the fairly easy 24 Qg5+ (black's mate threats eliminate most other moves) kf7 25 Rxf6+ Rxf6 26 Qg7+ the mate seems simple and forced. Had more trouble finding 24...Kh8 25 Bg7+ Bxg7 26 Qd8+ which is quicker but requires giving up the bishop for nothing.
Jun-01-12  poszvald: jonnyjack:
24, Rxf6 forces mate, but for black!:) (Re1#)

Sevenseaman: I did not see the need of continuous check I was rather thinging about white possibilities. Now I was spending for that as well a couple of minutes, but has not figured it out, why is there a continuous check need. Could you explain?

Thx

Jun-01-12  CHESSTTCAMPS: White is down a rook on the board, but black's N and Ra8 are not participants in the game. White is up a queen in the sector of the board that includes the black king. Both sides have back rank weaknesses and threats. Black's principal threat is 24... Re1+, forcing mate, limiting white's options to forcing moves only. However, 24.Qg4+(??) Kh8 leaves white without a good continuation, so it has to be

24.Qg5+! and now

A) 24... Bxg5 25.Rf8#

B) 24... Bg7 25.Qxg7#

C) 24... Kh8 25.Bg7+ Kg8 (Bxg7 26.Qd8+ mates in three) 26.Bxf6+ Kf8/f7 27.Qg7+ Ke8 28.Qg8+ Kd7 29.Qd8+ Kc6 30.Qc8#

D) 24... Kf7 25.Rxf6+ Rxf6 (Ke8 26.Rf8+ Kd7 27.Qd8+ Kc6 28.Qc8#) 26.Qg7+ Ke6 (Ke8 27.Qe7#) 27.Qe7+ Kf5 28.Qe4#

A pretty finish.

Jun-01-12  Patriot: Material is even.

Black threatens 24...Re1+.

There are so many checks but the one I like the best is <24.Qg5+> because of it's trappy nature (24...Bxg5 25.Rf8#).

A) 24...Kh8 25.Bg7+

A.1) 25...Bxg7 26.Qd8+ and mate in 2

A.2) 25...Kg8 26.Bxf6+

B) 24...Kf7 25.Rxf6+ Rxf6 26.Qg7+ Ke6 27.Qe7+ Kf5 28.Qe4#

Jun-01-12  TimothyLucasJaeger: The g-file checks seem to lead to nothing. 24 Rg5+ and or 24 Qg4+ can be met by 24 ... Kh8 when 25 Bg7+ Bxg7 leaves white with nothing, since his queen can't get to the last rank.

24 Qg5+ spoils the party, though. Now 24 ... Bxg5 runs into 25 Rf8#, while 24 ... Kh8 succumbs to 25 Bg7+ Bxg7 26 Qd8+ and mate soon to follow.

Black's only try is 24 ... Kf7, but here white has 25 Rxf6+ (not 25 Qg7+ Ke8 26 d7+ Kd8 with no clear follow-up) Ke8 ( 26 ... Rxf6 27 Qg7+ Ke6 28 Qe7+ Kf5 29 Qe4 is mate) 26 Rxe6+ Kd7 27 Qe7+ Kc6 28 Qc7#.

This puzzle was made simpler because white had no option to defend so he had to make a go of it or give up altogether.

Jun-01-12  CHESSTTCAMPS: Small errors in lines C, D (first paren) - unless # can be extended to mean # in 3!
Jun-01-12  sevenseaman: Its a funny funny world. English is a fast evolving language and we Indians love to use it whatever the proficiency. At times even simple connotations of a word can cause problems w/o our having to attach too many nuances to it.

I am a civil engineer by trade and in the early 80s I was posted in a god-forsaken place somewhere in central India. We mostly lived as forced bachelors but an exception was made in the case of a young engineer who had got newly married.

He was a mechanical engineer and was working on a project involving lifting of heavy loads. Those days cellphones were unheard of. Land line also used to be bit of a privilege.

One day this young engineer came to my room. He wanted to call home. I went out into the verandah. There wasn't much of a conversation and I saw him white-faced with terror as he came out.

'Whatever happened'? "I do not know my father was furious and wouldn't talk to me; says such matters are not discussed on the telephone and he is coming over tomorrow."

Sure enough the next day both worried parents were there, making it from a 1000 km or so.

They were closeted with the young couple for some time but when they came out to say a polite hello to their son's colleagues they seemed quite happy and so were the young couple.

It took some coaxing on my part to prise out the mystery. After a lot of hesitation the young engineer broke into a genuine smile.

"You see I was working on the jig ( trying to make a kind of a stationary fork-lift). I was having a problem and my dad being an engineer too I asked for his advice".

I was amused and confused. That cannot have been a reason for all this hassle and said as much.

Here the young man broke out into uncontrolled mirth and laughter. "You see I told my father I was having an erection problem".

No wonder the old man refused any further discussion. Ever since I have always maintained 'be wary of a foreigner's language'.

Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 5)
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 5 ·  Later Kibitzing>

NOTE: Create an account today to post replies and access other powerful features which are available only to registered users. Becoming a member is free, anonymous, and takes less than 1 minute! If you already have a username, then simply login login under your username now to join the discussion.

Please observe our posting guidelines:

  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate, or gibberish posts.
  3. No vitriolic or systematic personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No cyberstalking or malicious posting of negative or private information (doxing/doxxing) of members.
  6. No trolling.
  7. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by moderators, create a false impression of consensus or support, or stage conversations, is prohibited.

Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.

Blow the Whistle

See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a moderator.


NOTE: Please keep all discussion on-topic. This forum is for this specific game only. To discuss chess or this site in general, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
All moderator actions taken are ultimately at the sole discretion of the administration.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

<This page contains Editor Notes. Click here to read them.>

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
Fritz 8 busts 17. Bxf7+?! with 18...Kg7!!
from Demolition of Pawn Structure: Sac on f7 (f2) by Del ToRo
Astonishingly beautiful....
from Collections in Idleness 2 by Trigonometrist
White wins after 23...Kg8 - Friday
from Chess puzzles by 2ndNature
Fritz 8 busts 17. Bxf7+?! with 18...Kg7!!
from Demolition of Pawn Structure: Sac on f7 (f2) by patzer2
Astonishingly beautiful....
from Collections in Idleness 2 by kishchess
Game 30
from Modern Chess Brilliancies (Evans) by Qindarka
Game 30 in Modern Chess Brilliancies by Larry Melvyn Evans
from Uncle Ben's Rice shipped in a box to Fredthebear by fredthebear
24.? (Friday, July 2)
from POTD Benoni Old & New by takchess
Benoni Defense: Four Pawns Attack. Main Line (
from marwanredman123's favorite games 6 by Jaredfchess
keysorted
by NimbleKnight
Boris Vladimirov (1929-)
from PLayer of the day:notable game II by nikolaas
Benoni Defense: Four Pawns Attack. Main Line (
from marwanredman123's favorite games 6 by marwanredman123
Game 30 in Modern Chess Brilliancies by Larry Melvyn Evans
from Nolan's Road Crew by fredthebear
a69
from favorite games according to opening a00-a99 by mirage
This is a doosie of an example of modern sacrificial attack.
from Dirty Didactic Dozen (attack) by sorokahdeen
DrChopper's good games
by DrChopper
Astonishingly beautiful....
from Collections in Idleness 2 by xajik
24.? (June 1, 2012)
from Friday Puzzles, 2011-2017 by Phony Benoni
4 pawns attack QXb2 varation with Bf5
from giraffe752's favorite games by giraffe752

Home | About | Login | Logout | F.A.Q. | Profile | Preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | New Kibitzing | Chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | Privacy Notice | Contact Us

Copyright 2001-2020, Chessgames Services LLC