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Rustam Kasimdzhanov vs Hotze Hofstra
Vlissingen HZ op (2004), rd 1, Aug-07
Spanish Game: Bird Variation (C61)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Rustam takes the shirt yes off his back?..Qxe8 Bxe8 Rxe8. Iron out the wrinkles and white is steaming ahead as it would look like the black king needs oxygen. Hotze steels himself for a big press but he's not cottoned on to the fact 36.Be4 collars the queen.. the material ring boxes in and flattens her.
Jan-27-10  MiCrooks: yes, a hard Monday or easy Tuesday. Waaay to obvious for Wed.
Jan-27-10  hedgeh0g: This is a Monday puzzle. The Queen "sac" is pretty much screaming to be played.
Jan-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  benveniste: The game was already lost before 33. ...♖e8. Black can at best salvage a pawn for the knight at h3, leaving him down a piece and a pawn in an inferior position.
Jan-27-10  YouRang: Yep, maybe a new record for easiest Wednesday, especially since it is has similarities to yesterday's puzzle.

Who wouldn't look at 34.Qxe8+ and the rather obvious follow-up moves?

But, since I'm a bit pressed for time today, I appreciate the quickie. :-)

Jan-27-10  wals: Rybka 3 1cpu 3071mb hash highlights the decline in Blacks game Played Best
19....g5 +1.56 Qd6 +0.17 24....Ng5 +2.35 Bc6 +1.49 25...Rae8 +2.95 Rad8 +2.12 30...Nh3 +4.14 Ne6 +3.12 32...h6 +6.25 Qg6 +4.62 33...Re8 #10 Bf5 +6.58
Jan-27-10  turbo231: <cyclon: white wins all black's pieces at once>

Playing against an inferior chess engine yes, playing against Rybka no. Rybka blocks the white Bishop with her pawn. But even playing against Rybka it's an easy but a little tricky win. Be carefull!

Jan-27-10  gawain: Straightforward. Heavy pieces lined up on the e-file? Try the capture and see what happens.
Jan-27-10  Brandon plays: The answer was really pretty obvious. Hopefully, they make the next puzzle more complicated.
Jan-27-10  YouRang: Since it's so easy, it's a good opportunity to entertain ourselves by playing <sadistic chess>.

That's where you deliberately eschew the *quick* kill in favor of one that produces prolonged agony. Specialists in this field of chess know how to make just the right sub-optimal moves to keep their opponent lingering along with some meager dose of false hope.

Here, it might go:

<34.Qd1?!> "oh no, I could have won with 34.Qxe8+!" <34...Rxe1> thinking that they ended that threat (heh) <35.Qxe1> is dejectedly played and <35...Nf4+!> gets the knight out of trouble by taking advantage of the pinned g-pawn.

White gets out of check and unpins with <36.Kh2 Nxd5 37.cxd5>. Black sees that his b-pawn is in take, so <37...b6 38.Nxd7 Qxd7> [diagram]


click for larger view

Now, <39.Qe6!> threatens the Q, or Qxf6+ or d6. Since black's K can get over in time to stop the pawn, it seems like <39...Qxe6 40.dxe6 Kg8> is called for.

Then <41.d5 Kf8 42.d6 b5> (note the delicious false hope provided by black's queenside pawn majority) <43.h5 a5 44.Kh3 b4 45.Kg4 a4 46.Kf5 b3 47.axb3> (as if we're worried) <47...axb3 48.Kxf6 Ke8> (or else d7 wins quickly -- black plays right into our hands by avoiding the *quick* loss, Bwa-Ha-Ha) <49.e7 b2 50.Ke6 b1=Q> (getting a queen = last morsel of false hope) <51.d7#!>


click for larger view

Not that anyone would actually play this way...

Jan-27-10  pferd: <turbo231: cyclon: white wins all black's pieces at once

Playing against an inferior chess engine yes, playing against Rybka no. Rybka blocks the white Bishop with her pawn. But even playing against Rybka it's an easy but a little tricky win. Be carefull!>

I don't understand. Even after 34.Qxe8+ Kh7 35.Qxd7 every one of Black's piece's disappears. How does Rybka save them with a pawn move? (This may not be White's best line, but it is hard to lose when you have scarfed all your opponent's pieces).

Jan-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: YES; TOO EASY
Jan-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <Rybka blocks the white Bishop with her pawn.>

I am struggling to find a line where black can block the white bishop with a pawn to stop the massacre. At the end of the game line, we get to this position:


click for larger view

Now if 36...f5, white wins all the black pieces with 37. Bxf5+ Qg6 (forced) 38. Re7+ Kh8 (or Kg8) 39. Bxg6. True, the Nh3 ain't dead yet, but it's got nowhere to run to and will be a gonner soon.

Or perhaps we play something like this: 34...Kh7 35. Be4+ (not the best, but I am trying to give f5 every chance). 35...f5, leading to here:


click for larger view

Any sensible white move wins easily from here. Fritzie reckons that 36. Nxd7 is mate in 11.

I can't see any chess engine, inferior or otherwise, having the slightest problem with this fairly simple position.

Jan-27-10  parinda: i fell into the nasty trap 34.Be6?? thinking black automatically loses something but in fact its white losing something much more valuable after 34...Be6 (1st surprise) 35.Ne6 Re6 (2nd surprise) 36. Qe6 Nf4+ (3rd and final surprise)
Jan-27-10  turbo231: <Once>

Rybka plays a different line than Fritz does. It also depends on the line that you play. I set the level @ 20 moves in 30 minuates "repeating". Rybka's knight checked white's King, the pawn couldn't take the black knight because of the black Queen. It's still an easy win for white.

Jan-27-10  JG27Pyth: Wednesday? Really? I can't even find anything challenging in the side lines... there are no side-lines (although, You Rang's sadistic-chess is an amusing self-challenge... I play sadistic-chess whenever I get a won game against Fritz or chessmaster... I love making the computer suffer... lord how in-my-own-head is that?) ... I agree with <MarmotPFL's> damning appraisal of this puzzle: it requires no imagination.
Jan-27-10  pferd: <turbo231: Rybka's knight checked white's King, the pawn couldn't take the black knight because of the black Queen. It's still an easy win for white.>

I had suggested: "Even after 34.Qxe8+ Kh7 35.Qxd7 every one of Black's piece's disappears."

but turbo231 (and Rybka) are right. 35...Nf4+ does allow the Knight to escape. I missed the fact that Black's pinned Queen is pinning White's pawn.

Jan-27-10  wals: [ 36. Be4+ f5 37. Bxf5+ Qg6 38. Re7+ Kg8 39. Bxg6 Nf4+ 40. gxf4 Kf8 41. Rxb7 Kg8 42. Ne6 a6 43. Rb8# 1-0
Jan-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <turbo231> Okay, let's see if I've understood this correctly. The line you are thinking about is: 34. Qe8+ Kh7 35. Qxd7 Nf4+?

In other words, the black knight manages to escape from its tomb on h3, but to do this black has to give up a bishop and a rook? Hardly a fair exchange!

Jan-27-10  zb2cr: Hello <AccDrag>,

You wrote: " If White wants to twist the knife, he plays Re7+ before Bxg6. :-P".

Actually, 37. Re7+ is the fastest way to bring the point home. Black is forced back to hist first rank and kept pinned there by the Rook and Bishop. After 37. ... Kg8; 38. Bxg6 Black cannot escape the back rank and is doomed to be mated in very short order. White settles his Knight on e6 and delivers checkmate with the Rook on the Black back rank.

An illustrative line is given by <wals> in the kibitzing above:

<36. Be4+ f5 37. Bxf5+ Qg6 38. Re7+ Kg8 39. Bxg6 Nf4+ 40. gxf4 Kf8 41. Rxb7 Kg8 42. Ne6 a6 43. Rb8# 1-0>

Jan-27-10  gropek: White to play 34.?

Difficult: Medium/Easy

White is 2 pawns up.

Ok. The white queen is under attack. My first thoughts included blocking the rook attack, with moves like 34.Ne6 or 34.Be6. But i got nowhere. Then i left the position, and hours later, i saw almost instantly that, sacrificing the queen is a good idea. Because, after 34.QXe8+ Bxe8 35. Txe8+. I win a R+B and a 8th rank rook, just by sacrifing the queen. And also the king is nearly stuck. By that line of thought, i found:

34. Qxe8+ Bxe8
35. Txe8+ Kh7
36. Be4+ 1-0 (probably resigns now)

After 36 move, the black king has no squares to run, and that leaves no choice, and he has to block the check with the queen, and after the exchange, white has the advantage of one rook, and the other 2 pawns, of course.

Time to check.

Jan-27-10  muralman: Haven't been around much. Thought I'd stop by and check out the puzzle, and got it without giving it a thought.

Ummm... Is this Monday?

Jan-27-10  Eduardo Leon: Obviously, the answer is

34.♕xe8+ ♗xe8 35.♖xe8+ ♔h7 36.♗e4+

And now everything is hopeless.

36...♕g6 37.♖e7+ ♔g8 38.♗xg6

And perhaps engines can even find a forced mate in less than ten moves.

Jan-28-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: A very easy one-almost Monday quality. White gives up queen for rook and bishop,then wins black's lady.
Aug-30-11  sevenseaman: Kasim plays a solid game. He plays the big points well. No wonder he has wins against most of the big boys. His 34. Qxe8+ was to be expected.
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