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Josef Kourek vs Tomas Oral
CSR-chT 9091 (1990), rd 7
Queen's Gambit Declined: Tartakower Defense. Exchange Variation (D59)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-11-11  PinnedPiece: Monday time goal: 30 sec

Start with Q and sac it (5 sec).

Look for knight move: see fork (3 sec).

Verify no outliers to mess up the plan. (7 sec)

Total Time: 15 sec.

Result: Success.

.

Jul-11-11  David2009: <Once> excellent advice! Here's the position linked to Crafty EGT colours- reversed: White to play and draw.


click for larger view

http://www.chessvideos.tv/endgame-t... Against a better player, 1.Ka2 (corresponding to 39...Kh7) definitely gives the easier ride.

<sevenseaman>: pas mal, mon vieux!

Jul-11-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: White sacs the queen at f6 and regains it with a fork at d5! White gains the knight.

Queen loans at shark rates!!

Jul-11-11  The HeavenSmile: <sevenseaman>

white can stop black pawns and win in three with 1.Qe2 f1=B 2.Qxf1+ Kb2 3.Na4+ Ka3

and then white can blockade the second pawn and win. But white can also mate in 3 with 1.Qa1+ Kxa1 2. Kc2 f8=Q 3.Nb3#

Jul-11-11  stst: No 1-punch mate, but a 1-punch deal: Customary Q-sac: 40.QxN+ KxQ (way too much if not taking this Q..)
41.Nd5+ forks and Bk'Q is lost, leaving W one extra N to lead the troop of P's - sailing to a win should have no problem at all.
Jul-11-11  stst: <Just got a text message on my cell phone ... apparently someone out there does not read ESDN. (Old style.)

N-Q5 is the same as "Knight to Queen's Five," and also = Nd5.>

Good to have someone to agree on the ESDN - I do find it actually tells more at times, e.g. here QxN+ tells more than Qxf6+, for what's there @f6? (Recall Fischer's hand-written score sheet for the Game of Century - all good oldies!!)

Jul-11-11  Waitaka: <Once> your advice is good, but please let me share mine, wich helped me a lot. First I got a chessboard and did put a knight on it, near the center. Then I did put beans on each square that the knight can attack on it's next move (yes, I said beans). Since I dont have digital beans here with me, let me use pawns:


click for larger view

This is a basic and useful diagram, and ilustrate everything you said about colors. Begginers have to memorize this pattern.

Then I used corn to mark on the board all the positions the knight can reach on his second move. I am also short on corn, so I will use bishops.


click for larger view

Staring on the above diagram is alredy useful. Note how far the knight on the center can reach on two moves. And look how difficult is for the knight to reach the four white squares that are by his (or her) side. And adding little sunflowers seeds on the board, now I will mark all squares that our knight can reach on the third move (ok, I will use rooks):


click for larger view

And this is the one I like the most. The knight can cover all the board but 5 squares. These are the squares you want to be if you are running away from a knight. Memorize them, and your knight skills will be really boosted.

Sorry all pro players for this too much basic post, but this really help me on moving knights fast. Sometimes I even think I am Tal!! ;)

Jul-11-11  scormus: <sevenseaman: Cockalorum!>

maybe this is what youre loking for?

http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiCA...

Jul-11-11  sevenseaman: <HeavenSmile> Your last line hits the nail on its head. <David2000> merci, fermez le cas, s'ilvous plait.
Jul-11-11  sevenseaman: No my friend <scormus>, just a trendy tune that got stuck in my head for a longish while. Hope to be rid of the affliction when I get up tomorrow morning.
Jul-11-11  MaczynskiPratten: Looks like Black outgraded White by about 300 points. So you'd think he wouldn't be wanting to play for the obvious draw, but carried on in the hope that White would blunder at some point. Instead of which, he blundered himself. However, Black's play round moves 25-35 looks more as if he was the one wanting the draw (by trying to exchange Queens).
Jul-11-11  Patriot: <Waitaka> Interesting diagrams! Thanks for sharing those.
Jul-11-11  scormus: <sevenseaman: No my friend <scormus>, just a trendy tune>

in the 21st C, I dont suppose Maddy Prior is considered trendy. Dommage, or maybe schade.

Jul-11-11  dark.horse: <Waitaka> Very instructive!
Jul-11-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <Waitaka> Terrific, we can never know it all in chess!

Good to hear from you...drop by my forum if you like.

Jul-11-11  Beadyeyezz: Whoever said they dont like mondays definately weren't a chess playing member of cg.com!! But i still cant see all the way to mate just to go a knight and passed pawn ahead which i guess is enough?
Jul-11-11  estrick: <Waitaka> I have pointed out to a number of students that if you have a piece in close proximity to a knight that you're trying to keep out of harm's way, 2 squares away diagonally is about as safe as you can get.

Your diagrams make a very compelling visual. I'll do this exercise with them in the future. But I may use pennies, nickels, and dimes instead of beans and corn.

Jul-11-11  Waitaka: Thank's <Patriot>, <dark.horse> and <morfishine>. Always learning and sharing.
Jul-11-11  Nullifidian: No mate, but a simple win the advantage puzzle:

40. ♕xf6+ ♔xf6 (♔h7 41. ♕xf7+ ♔h8 42. ♕g8#) 41. ♘d5+ followed by 42. ♘xc7.

Jul-11-11  WhiteRook48: 40 Qxf6+ Kxf6 41 Nd5+ followed by taking the queen. Duh.
Jul-11-11  Waitaka: <estrick: <Waitaka> I have pointed out to a number of students that if you have a piece in close proximity to a knight that you're trying to keep out of harm's way, 2 squares away diagonally is about as safe as you can get.

Your diagrams make a very compelling visual. I'll do this exercise with them in the future. But I may use pennies, nickels, and dimes instead of beans and corn.>

LOL

In fact I used an excel spreadsheet and painted the cells with different colors. The visual is more exciting than corn and beans, trust me.

However I really use beans when teaching my 4 years old son the picies movements. First, I put a piece alone on the board, and then I use beans to show where the piece can move to.

Then I set up a board with a single white piece, and put some other pieces, white and black, on its path. Then I ask my son to put a bean on each square to where the piece can move.

I am particularly interested in this kind of technique, on how to teach chess to a 4 years old kid.

Jul-11-11  avidfan: <Waitaka> Very good visual aid about the knight's manouvres. I have always been frustrated at how long the knight takes (4 moves) to go to a destination on a diagonal two squares away.

There's a puzzle known as De Moivre's knight tour where the knight starts at a corner square and must visit each of the remaining 63 squares once only. All I can remember is that it circles around the edge of the board initially.

E.g.

a1 b3 a5 b7 d8 f7 h8 g6 h4 g2 e1 c2 and maybe a3 etc...

Jul-11-11  Waitaka: <avidfan: <Waitaka> Very good visual aid about the knight's manouvres. I have always been frustrated at how long the knight takes (4 moves) to go to a destination on a diagonal two squares away. There's a puzzle known as De Moivre's knight tour where the knight starts at a corner square and must visit each of the remaining 63 squares once only. All I can remember is that it circles around the edge of the board initially.

E.g.

a1 b3 a5 b7 d8 f7 h8 g6 h4 g2 e1 c2 and maybe a3 etc...>

When I was on college, my Pascal teacher gave us this problem, and coincidently a magazine presented it on the same time.

The fastest solution, if I recall correctly is to always move the knight to the square that limits his next move the most.

Let me google this...

Here it is! http://www.mayhematics.com/t/histor...

And at the last paragraph: "Play the knight to a square where it commands the fewest cells not yet used". Almost the same I wrote ;P

Anyway, me and a colleague, we did the Pascal code (mostly him), and our solution was the fastest on the classroom. I think most of the students were trying every combination, as I remember some codes took hours to execute, and our took less than 2 seconds.

But as you can see on the above link, there are several solutions to the problem.

Jul-12-11  LIFE Master AJ: <Jul-11-11 Waitaka>

I enjoyed your Knight lesson very much, the next time I teach a beginner I will try to remember to bring coins (my modus operandi for years) and do a similar exercise.

Jul-12-11  Thanh Phan: <Waitaka> Very good advice to teach piece moves! Offer many thanks ~Thanh
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